Featuring New Mexico Building Healthy Military Communities

first_imgSusie Galea is the project coordinator in New Mexico for the new pilot program, Building Healthy Military Communities.Susie is the most former Mayor of Alamogordo, NM, where proudly Holloman AFB and a NM Guard Armory are hosted. She also volunteered as an ESGR Area Chairman for Guardsmen, Reservist, transitioning active duty, disabled Veterans, and their spouses.Susie has firsthand knowledge of all Service Member/Veteran resources, programs, and benefits related to employment, family programs, service delivery, diversity, small-business development for entrepreneurs, and more.  Recognizing the needed services for Guard members that are not yet classified as Veterans under federal legislation, she looks forward to especially coordinating resources for those NM Guard members who are underserved.Her motivation to serve through Building Healthy Military Communities comes from being a former military spouse of fourteen years.  Susie acutely aware of the sacrifices by those that are Service Members and their supporting family members.Prior to serving as the mayor of Alamogordo, Susie owned and operated a small childcare development business from her home for 5 years, and also has 15 years experience in accounting management and bookkeeping.  Her bachelors degree is in Organizational Management from Ashford University’s Forbes School of Business.Over the last five years Susie has established rapport with statewide leaders, to include New Mexico’s Governor, and her state cabinet members that support the military community.  Susie believes in building and maintaining key business relationships, and statewide networks, which will lend to her ability to quickly develop an overall BHMC state action plan addressing identified gaps of services. Today we interviewed Susie Galea, State Coordinator for the Building Healthy Military Communities Program in New Mexico. We had the chance to talk to Susie about the current work & challenges in New Mexico.  Next week we will take a closer look at the community assessments taking place across New Mexico so that we can better understand how the program works.last_img read more

Everything You Need to Know About the OxygenTec ProPanel

first_imgThe new OxygenTec ProPanel is aimed at the traveling colorist or the beginning colorist on a budget. Is it the right device for you? Let’s take a look. Top image from icoloristThe new OxyenTec ProPanel’s relatively simple interface comes with the most important features for a control surface: the triple rings and dials for controlling shadows, midtones, and highlights. These are commonplace to every single control surface out there, including Blackmagic’s premium surface, which features all the bells and whistles. At only around $800, OxygenTec’s panel is definitely a cheaper alternative to the JL Cooper Eclipse, the Avid Artist Color, the Tangent Element and even the older Tangent Wave model.The ProPanel is available now and integrates natively with DaVinci Resolve, connecting via USB. Aside from the main dials and trackballs, several buttons line the top of the control surface. From left to right, you have commands for:UndoRedoGrab StillPlay StillPrevious NodeNext NodeStart DynamicMark for KeyframingBase Memory (resets just the node you’re on)There are also reset buttons for the dials and trackballs. The list of commands available means you’ll still be navigating around the timeline with your mouse, and likely using a lot of keyboard commands in general. Still, even just having the dials and trackballs will make you much faster at grading. A panel is a must in any session, since making adjustments on the color wheels inside DaVinci Resolve’s software tends to be cumbersome. It’s not really my idea of fun.Here’s a video review from fellow colorist Warren Eagles and his thoughts on the ProPanel:In my opinion, the Tangent Element is a better purchase since it’s expandable. The beginner colorist requires the dials and trackballs that come standard on every control panel to approach grading seriously. The other panels in the Element set can be purchased at a later date as business expands. They’re also easy to transport and lightweight to boot. Since OxygenTec’s ProPanel is a new product, I’m hoping the company aims to release several additions similar to the Element which seems to be its main competitor. As of now though, at this price point you’re better suited to investing in a product from Tangent.Interested in learning more about the colorist lifestyle? Check out these articles from PremiumBeat:5 Reasons to Get a Color Grading Control SurfaceDaVinci Resolve Workflow Roundtrip BreakdownTips for Achieving Real-Time Playback in DaVinci ResolveThink you might get an OxygenTec ProPanel? Tell us why (or why not) in the comments below!last_img read more

How to Apply Camera-Friendly Makeup for Men and Women

first_imgMakeup application is a key part of filmmaking. Sure, makeup can make you look more attractive, but it’s really used to correct the distortions caused by the camera lens and lights.Cameras can accentuate wrinkles, affect skin tone, and magnify skin flaws like scars and acne. Makeup is used to bring out natural features and cover up an blemishes.The lights and camera will wash out your natural skin tone, so you need makeup to bring your skin back to life and keep you from looking like a ghost. Warm colors are best for video. Cooler colors are overly exaggerated on camera. Be sure to use matte and neutral hues. Also, avoid high-shine that is commonly found in blushes, lip glosses, and eye shadow.Make Up Tips for MenMen at least require powdered makeup, especially if they are bald. Bald heads reflect lights, so powdered makeup is needed all over their head to prevent light from bouncing off of them. The oil produced by pores shines on camera, and a small amount of powder can significantly reduce that.The key for men is evening out skin tone, covering blemishes, and eliminating any shine or reflection.Check out this video from Pixiwoo, where they show how to properly groom a male subject before applying makeup. Then you will see the proper steps to making them look great on camera. Makeup Tips for WomenOne of the most desired looks for women, on and off camera, is the No Makeup makeup look. It’s a very natural look that accentuates features without looking overly colorful or made up. In this tutorial from Sephora, you will learn the step-by-step process of creating the “No Makeup” makeup look.In this tutorial from Gregory Arlt, the Director of Makeup Artistry for MAC Cosmetics, you can learn a simple and quick technique to help achieve flawless skin.In this video, Gregory Arlt shows you how to correctly apply lipstick with a brush. Start in the center of the lip and then blend it in. It creates a very simple stained look. Be sure to apply a bit more to the center of the lip, which will lightly soften the edges to blend in with the skin.When it comes to eyeliner, lay the brush flat, right above the eyelid and bring it straight across. By laying the brush flat, you will achieve a straight line every time.For eyebrows, first take the brow pencil and brush them into place. Use a pencil that’s a shade lighter than your subject’s brow color to help define the brow, rather than darkening it. Hold the pencil to the side and feather the brow. Then use an angle brush to distribute the color. Finally, use the brow pencil once again to brush the brows. Movie makeup ranges from simple applications to incredibly complex monster looks. In this roundup, learn how to apply the “No Makeup” makeup technique.Film unions classify movie makeup artists based on the area of the actor’s body needing makeup. A makeup artist applies cosmetics from the top of a persons head to the top of their breastbone. A body makeup artist applies makeup to any other area of an actor’s body.In this article we will be focusing on a makeup artist’s “No Makeup” makeup, specifically applying makeup that does not look like a person is wearing makeup.center_img Bonus TipImage: Sephora store via CosmopolitanIf you will be applying your own makeup, and have no experience doing so, don’t be afraid to ask for help.One of the best options available is going straight to a makeup store. You can visit department stores or go to specialty shops like Sephora. You’ll easily find a makeup artist who can help you find the right makeup for your skin, and even show you how to apply it.Have any experience with applying makeup? Got any tips to share? Do it in the comments below!last_img read more

5 Tips for Building a Video Professional Linkedin Profile

first_imgImage via Shutterstock.References are another great way to validate your skills and expertise. In the Linkedin community, it’s common practice for people to exchange references. That is, if you want one from a colleague, you might want to offer writing one for them first in exchange.Another trick I recommend is to write out references for others to submit (people do this with resumes all the time). It’s acceptable to write out a reference detailing your skills and achievements, then send it to your colleague and ask them to review, change, or touch it up — and submit it on your profile.4. Be Upfront About Your Ideal Projects/JobsImage via Shutterstock.If you’re investing time and resources into your Linkedin profile, it’s probably because you’re looking for something. Whether that’s a new employment opportunity, more freelance work, or a better professional network, it’s important to take inventory of your intentions.If you know exactly what you’d like to accomplish, there’s no reason you shouldn’t put that on your profile to let people know. Linkedin connects employers with employees; if you feed it what you’re looking for, it will work for you.5. Don’t Bury Contact InfoImage via Shutterstock.Not everyone checks Linkedin every day, which is fine. There are a million other things you can do with your time, but as such, getting a message through the website or your app may mean a longer delay in contact than an email or a call. You can and should put your preferred contact info on your profile, preferably in your first summary section with suggested instructions on how to best contact you.Looking for more tips on finding clients and developing your brand? Check out these articles.Advice on Finding Corporate Video Clients5 Tips on Effective Networking: Digitally or In-Person6 Great Websites for Finding Video Editing JobsVimeo Hack: How to Boost Your Vimeo PageBrowse our full collection of video production articles here. Linkedin offers a number of opportunities to professional videographers and filmmakers. Find out how to take full advantage of your profile.Cover image via Shutterstock.Linkedin, to many, is perhaps the most useful yet least fun of the major social media networks. It’s useful because it can be a great resource to make connections, grow a professional network, and find new work opportunities. However, it can also be intimidating and not as user-friendly as Facebook or Twitter.However, if you’re looking to maximize your social footprint and expand your personal brand for more and better opportunities, here are five useful tips to help you build out your Linkedin profile.1. Show Your WorkImage via Shutterstock.If you’re a video professional (cinematographer, motion designer, or anything in between), it’s important to show off your work early and often. Linkedin, via recent updates, now offers several ways to do this.I’d recommend you feature a link to your professional portfolio page (whether it’s a sizzle reel on Vimeo or an entire webpage showcasing your work). While this still gets obscured by the “show more” in a browser and the Linkedin App, it will still appear with your personal information (see above).You can also now include links (or even uploads) of work samples under your jobs in the Experience section. These will show up with quality thumbnails (and an option to click through if it’s a link). I would highly recommend featuring samples throughout your Experience (more on why below).2. Highlight Your ExperienceAs with links and samples, your Experience section will be one of the first place employers or clients will look. Be sure to explain your role and job duties for each entry.Pro-Tip for Freelancers: If you freelance full or part time, you can create a Freelance Experience entry that includes up-to-date samples of your most recent freelance work with instructions on how to contact you.3. Get (and Give) Referenceslast_img read more

A Practical Guide to Working with Light Stands on Set

first_imgLight stands are priceless assets on any set. With the right stand for the job, you can create a safe and effective working environment.Cover image via Shutterstock.Different projects call for different light stands. The team at Grip Tips has created a series all about the standard light stands you’ll see on most any independent film set. Let’s take a look at how to effectively use each type.Standard Light StandsMost of us are familiar with these standard aluminum light stands that come with most kits. While they usually get the job done, they can easily break or deteriorate over time. It’s always a great idea to upgrade standard stands for something more robust. A poorly built light stand that you can’t raise to its full height can slow down the workflow on set. By investing in high-quality equipment, you can avoid this headache in the future.Preemie StandsA preemie baby stand is a sturdy replacement for your standard light stand. These stands weigh around 5lbs and can typically rise up to six feet and support up to 25lbs. In situations wherein your standard light stands may fail, the preemie stand will excel. If you take good care of them, these stands can last most of your career.Low Boy StandsYour low boy stands are the perfect solution when you need to mount a light a little bit lower — they’re also commonly used with a slider, like a Dana Dolly or a rhino slider. These stands can hold over 70lbs. and are more rigid than a preemie stand.Beefy Baby StandsBeefy baby stands are your next step up in the world of light stands. Although heavy and harder to transport, these stands feature a much higher build quality than a preemie stand or a standard light stand. As replacements for your standard light stand, these offer far more features. Beefy baby stands feature a steel/aluminum construction, and they typically support up to 22lbs, raise up to 12 feet, and feature a ⅝” baby pin (hence the term “baby stand”). These beefy baby stands will accommodate most lights up to a 2K fresnel and smaller HMIs like a Joker 800. Most importantly, they will endure the toughest working conditions.Combo StandsCombo, or junior stands, are the robust bigger brothers of the baby stands. These stands feature a much higher weight capacity — up to 70lbs. Combo/junior stands accommodate larger light fixtures, like a M18 or an ARRI Skypanel. They also are capable of many other duties beyond holding lights. Unlike baby stands, these stands feature a junior pin receiver to help support the added weight from the larger lights.C-StandsC-Stands actually warrant their own blog post. They are the most versatile of any stand on set. They can hold a light, support a bounce board, or organize clothing in wardrobe. If you don’t already own a C-stand, I would thoroughly recommend picking one up and getting used to its functionality, as you will see this stand on all professional sets.Understanding the correct stands to use on a film set can save time and create safer working conditions for everyone. Knowing the difference between all the different stands will also help you to select the right tool on set.last_img read more

Interview: The Director and The Producer Behind “Man on Fire”

first_imgIn 2014, a preacher in Grand Saline, Texas self-immolated to protest racism in his town. We talked with the filmmakers who captured his story.All images via Joel Fendelman.At this year’s Slamdance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, Man on Fire debuted as an official documentary feature. This film tells  the story of Charles Moore, the Texas preacher who set himself on fire to protest the dark history of racism in his town. We sat down with director Joel Fendelman and producer James Chase Sanchez to talk about the challenges of capturing this story and what motivated them to bring it to the world.PremiumBeat: Joel, tell me what drew your interest to this project?Joel Fendelman: At the time I was working towards my MFA degree in the Radio, Television, Film program at the University of Texas, Austin. Chase and I had a mutual friend Kristen Lacefield who told me about Chase’s research and the story of Charles Moore. I was immediately taken back by the extreme act and that I had never heard about it. In fact, I had just arrived in Austin about a month after Charles self-immolated in Grand Saline. I remember especially at that moment having larger existential questions about purpose and my responsibility to social justice in society. And more specifically that I wasn’t doing enough. Whether it was going to a protest march or giving a few bucks to homeless person, it always felt like just enough to stave off the guilt. And here was a preacher who spent his whole life on a mission for social justice and felt that he had not done enough. So I was floored and in awe of this preacher who sacrificed his life in such a horrific manner for a social justice cause. So it attracted me on a deep personal level but also as in everything it wasn’t so black and white. There were many questions I had about Charles, about this town, about his choice. I knew immediately that this could be a good opportunity to explore these questions in a documentary that I would use as my final thesis project.PB: Chase, tell us a bit about the research Joel mentioned. What were you working on, and why?James Chase Sanchez: So I am an academic, and at the time of Moore’s self-immolation, I was in graduate school at Texas Christian University studying racial rhetorics (how people talk about race). On June 23, 2014, Moore self-immolated, and I started collecting news stories and talking with news organizations about this story to get it to the public. I went to my dissertation advisor and told him about Moore, and he suggested it should be my entire dissertation project. I framed my dissertation by talking about the recent uptick in self-immolations globally and then moving into the racial perceptions and folklore in Grand Saline. So by the time Joel got in touch with me about possibly making this documentary, I was already 2/3 through my project and had already interviewed 25 people.I knew almost immediately when Moore self-immolated that if I ever had a story I needed to tell in my life this was it because I was raised in Grand Saline, and the racism that Moore wrote about was a racism I saw in the early-2000s. When his story didn’t make national news, I was upset because I couldn’t understand how something so powerful, something so visceral, didn’t get as much attention as self-immolations that take place in other parts of the world, like Tunisia and Tibet. So I jumped into my dissertation wanting to do justice by Moore, at least in an academic sense, and by extension, I believe this documentary does him justice, too.PB: What gear did you use while shooting, and how big was your crew? Were there particular equipment challenges that you think were unique to this project?JF: The documentary portion of the film was shot using a Sony A7sII with vintage Zeiss Contax lenses. In fact most of the footage was filmed using the 28mm. I used a Sony A6300 B camera for interviews and Ikan DS-1 gimbal for the floating shots. There were three of us: I ran camera, Chase did the interviews, and most of the location audio was done by Rodd Simonsen — with a few pick-up days by others when he couldn’t make it.For the reenactment section, it was a full narrative-like crew. There were probably about 15-20 people over the three-day filming, and we used a Panasonic Varicam LT with Cooke mini S4 lenses.One equipment challenge I had during interviews was that the A6300 B camera would overheat after about 20 minutes when filming in 4k. There were many times when I had stop the interview and cool off the camera. We eventually just ended up filming in 2k with that camera to avoid the overheating issue.During the reenactment filming we brought on Big Dog Pyro to handle the pyrotechnics — who were fantastic to work with. We had a particular shot where we wanted the flames to encroach into the frame from either side. It was a challenge to figure where to position the camera and the flame bars. We ended up putting our cinematographer on the floor with the camera and the flame bars right above him and covering him with flame retardant blankets and filming at 240fps.PB: Chase, I understand you faced some production challenges on this project. Particularly social challenges. Can you tell us about that? Did it ultimately benefit or damage the project?JCS: Yes, since I grew up in the town, I found there to be some social challenges with the film. One of the first challenges is that there were many people who did not want to talk to me because they believed I had a liberal agenda I wanted to spread. I am an academic who studies race and rhetoric, and I have some radical thoughts when it comes to racial issues in America that I talk about publicly. Some town members believed the film was going to be used as propaganda against the town—that we would be claiming the town is racist and all the people in it are racist. So on that end, there were many people who would have been great to interview because they had some deep knowledge and stories about the town, but they chose not to share them with us. Also, I had a few friends who actually wanted to talk but felt they would be chastised by the town if they spoke, which is unfortunate. These challenges came to the forefront during our last trip to town, when we were asked not to attend the football game because it would be “better for us.” We were unsure if someone actually feared for our safety or if they just did not want us to attend the game.Also, during this time, we learned from some prominent citizens in town that there were some people meeting and discussing our project and if they should speak with us or not. I am not sure if Joel agrees or not, but I felt that there were some people who spoke with us because they spoke with other people in town and got “permission” (in one way or another) to be interviewed. I think that was one of the challenges. I mostly felt people were honest with us on camera, but in some of the interviews, I had to press some people who I thought might be spinning stories.Overall, I would say that my relationship to the town actually helped the project. I believe if outsiders came to town and tried to make this documentary, most of the town would have not responded. Michael Hall, the author of the “Man on Fire” article in Texas Monthly, which was one of the inspirations of the documentary, told me that he had a hard time getting anyone in town to discuss race with him. So while there were many people who did not speak because they knew me and believed we had an agenda, I still think my presence did make some people feel more comfortable because why would a former citizen who mostly enjoyed his adolescent years in town launch into a full-on assault of the town? I think we did a good job alleviating these problems by describing the nuance we were shooting for in the film, and I believe the final product is something that reflects this nuance.PB: Joel, do you want to weigh in?JF: It was interesting for me to observe Chase interacting with the townspeople, many who he had connection to directly or through family or friends. It was always a question whether the person knew Chase’s politics and if so how they felt about it. And then myself being a Jewish city boy, I was curious how that would come off. But interestingly enough, no one ever really asked. I’d say barring the experiences that Chase mentioned and some controversy on social media at the end, all the interviewees were pretty friendly and forthcoming. I did have a concern about how people would discuss race with us on camera and whether we could get anyone to really talk about it — similar to Michael Hall’s challenge. But the beauty of cinema in contrast to a written article is that the camera captures so much. So even when someone doesn’t want to answer a question or brushes it off, the visual act of not saying something can speak volumes. It kind of goes in line with the saying that a picture speaks a thousand words.PB: Joel, you mentioned that you shot the documentary using vintage lenses, and we’re seeing more and more of this trend in the industry. As a cinematographer, what were you hoping to bring to your project with the particular load-out you carried on location?JF: There are a number of reasons I decided to go with the vintage lenses. Firstly, digital can be very sharp and sterile, so any way that we can add character and slightly soften the edge of the digital image the better — unless one is going for the sharp, sterile look. Secondly, you can get pretty high-quality lenses for relatively cheap, at least compared to what a new lens of similar quality might cost.As far as the equipment that I decided to use, it was based around a combination of price, aesthetic, and size. I love the look that the DSLRs are able to bring in such a small, reasonably priced package. At that point the Sony A7sII mirrorless camera had recently come out and was carrying a good reputation with quality and incredible low light capabilities. So it seemed like a good fit for this film because we wanted to be as low-key as possible and use natural light whenever available. It also allowed me to use the Ikan gimbal to create these very high-production-value, Steadicam-like shots for a fraction of the cost.PB: Man on Fire was an official selection this year at Slamdance. What was your experience with the festival, and where can we look to watch the film?JCS: Well, this was my first time at a film festival, so I was mesmerized by everything. Park City was full of people attending Sundance and Slamdance, and it was exciting to see so many creative people coming together to share their work with the world. For Slamdance especially, the mantra is “for filmmakers by filmmakers,” and you see that encompassed in the fabric of the festival. So many great independent filmmakers converged at this one festival, and the experience was very communal in nature. I was so happy to be a part of this project and to be able to experience this festival.We have a few forthcoming screenings: we are screening at the Big Sky Film Festival in Missoula, Montana on February 17th, and we will also be in the San Luis Obispo Film Festival in March. We also have two upcoming school screenings at the Liberty Hall in Tyler, TX on February 28th at 6:00pm and at Texas Christian University on March 1st at 7:00pm. Finally, we will be a part of the PBS Independent Lens series either this fall or next spring.JF: Let me add that one of the key motivating factors for us making this film was to use it as a vehicle for discussion and reflection. We have a link on our website, where you can request to host a screening and have us attend. So even if the film isn’t as of now scheduled to come to your town, it can be…Looking for more filmmaking interviews? Check these out.Interview: How the Editor Behind I, Tonya Recreated HistoryInterview: How This Oscar Nom Edited Downsizing While Directing His First FeatureExclusive Interview: The Secrets Behind RED Sensors and ResolutionInterview: Reality T.V. Sound Mixer Matthew HughesA Conversation with the DP of The Confession TapesInterested in more on working with vintage lenses? Read our previous coverage.Using Vintage Film Lenses on Micro 4/3 CamerasExplore the Ultimate Vintage Lens LibraryWorking with Vintage Lenses on Modern CamerasShould You Use Vintage Lenses on Your Next Project?What Do Filmmakers Mean When They Refer to the Cooke Look?last_img read more

How To Have Productive Disagreements

first_imgAs you work in sales and in business you are going to disagree with your peers and your team about what the best course of action is in some circumstances. You will have strong feelings, and they will have strong feelings too. You will end up arguing with each other about what course of action you should take.These disagreements can be productive, or they can be relationship and result killers. Here’s how to make them productive.Make the Necessary Deposits: If you want to have productive arguments with your peers and your team (and maybe your clients) you need to have already made deposits in those relationships. Unless and until your intentions are known, disagreements may feel like they are personal and political. But if your intentions are known and your relationship is strong, then arguments and disagreements can be very productive in helping you produce better results.Don’t Make Personal Attacks: It bears repeating: if you want to have productive disagreements, you cannot make it personal. Your argument needs to center on the best choice to produce the outcome over which you are arguing. You cannot make personal attacks against the person or people you are arguing with. If they’ve done wrong in the past, leave it in the past. If they made mistakes in the past, leave those mistakes in the past, too. Confine your disagreement to the subject matter at hand.Accept That Other’s Intentions Are Good: You cannot have a productive disagreement while also questioning the other person’s intentions. If their intentions are bad, if what they are arguing for is immoral or illegal for example, then you are not having a productive disagreement. But if you’re arguing over the best course of action, then you have to assume that the other person wants the same outcome you do. If you treat them as if their intentions are bad, you can’t easily get to the best decision.Have a Clean Heart Yourself: And if you want other people to treat you as if your intentions are good you also have to have a clean heart. Your disagreement is not a productive disagreement if it is personal or political. If your gain is really what is driving your argument, you are not having a productive disagreement. Assume that others have good intentions and make sure your intentions are also above reproach.Find a Path You Can Agree On: And here’s the thing about productive disagreements: you don’t win by winning the argument. You win a productive disagreement by discovering the best path forward and gaining agreement as to what that path really is. I’ve had great relationships with partners who were willing to allow the person with the strongest feelings to determine the path forward in many important cases. They allowed the other person to make the decision because they valued the relationship as much as they did the outcome. And that is the heart of having a productive disagreement.Remember, your goal in a productive disagreement isn’t to beat the other person (or persons). Your goal is to choose the best path forward together. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

My Two Favorite New Productivity Tools

first_imgIt’s very rare that I write about software, apps, or tools. Tools and technologies are Miles Austin‘s domains. But there are two software programs that I am using now that are worth your time and attention because they may help you increase your personal productivity. One productivity tool is for writing, and one is for quantifying.UlyssesUlysses is a writing application for Apple products that allows you to write and organize your text files. The serious tech nerds do all of their writing in text files.The primary reason techies love text files is that they are universal, meaning you can open them in any application. The fact that text files are universal means that they are future proof; you are always going to be able to open your files in the future, no matter what happens to Evernote, Word, Google Docs, or whatever app it is that you like now.But there are other reasons to love text files. Writing in plain text eliminates distractions so you can focus on the writing. Because there is no formatting, text files are tiny and easy to sync, which is excellent since Ulysses stores all of your files in iCloud. The lack of formatting makes it very easy to drop the text into other software programs when you need to make them your beautiful words look beautiful, and Ulysses allows styles that export already formatted based on presets.My Ulysses application and librariesUlysses enables you to organize your files however you like. You can put them in groups, or you can filter on keywords and tags, among other things. You can search for your files from anywhere within Ulysses.I have moved most of my archives from this blog into Ulysses. In the Archive folder, I have 2,326 sheets (what you might call documents) amounting to just over 1,250,000 words. This archive lets me search quickly and pull text from my past writings.I like having all of my writing in one place, as well as the simplicity of the plain text.AirtableAirtable (affiliate link) would be like a spreadsheet if a spreadsheet were also a database.I am using Airtable to quantify myself. I am tracking everything I do, every day. I have main categories set up so that I can generate reports on where and how I spend my time, allowing me to make adjustments. If you have never tracked your time, you are going to learn a lot about yourself. I spend way more time with my family than you might imagine (and I can prove it).I am tracking eight or nine data points around my health, like weight, hours slept, and time in meditation. I set up one spreadsheet-like-database to keep track the books I am reading and listening to using Audible. Because Airtable is a database, I can export my notes from my Amazon.com Kindle page and upload the PDF to the record for each book.I also have a little contact database for my most significant relationships, one for all my travel membership and rewards numbers, and one for a record of all my writing.My Airtable screenBecause Airtable has a nice iPhone app, tracking is quick and painless, which means it’s easy to keep up with in real-time. There is no iPad app yet, but it is in the works.These two tools are always open on my computer. Ulysses has even become my notebook and capture tool. If they interest you, check them out. If you do try them, send me a note and let me know what you think. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

In U.P., potato farmers dump their produce as prices crash

first_imgTwo arrested in Lucknow for dumping potatoes Large dumps of rotting potatoes can be spotted on either side of the kutcha road leading to Bhimakpura village. The stench emanating from them is unbearable. But for hungry mules and cows, the potatoes, discarded by farmers and cold storages, are a welcome treat.“At least these animals are helping us clear it, or else all this will lead to illness,” said young farmer Anuj Yadav, who is stacking Pokhraj potatoes freshly reaped on his family’s 20 bigha land some distance away.This year, Mr. Yadav, a resident of Tirwa, has already got 50 sacks of potatoes (one sack holds 50 kg on average) from just three bighas.Production is not the problem here. Farmers are finding it difficult to sell their produce at profitable rates. Mr. Yadav fears the potatoes grown by him this year will face the same fate as his produce last year, when he produced 200 sacks. Out of it he sold 100 in the market, while the other half he dumped in a cold storage, in the expectation that the government would purchase it or the rates would improve. That didn’t happen.Also Read  And as prices fell and the new crop started pouring in, Mr. Yadav’s old potatoes turned into a liability as they had no takers. Withdrawing them from the cold storage and transporting them to the marketss in the hope of a profitable sale would entail additional costs for him.“So I left them to rot. The cold storage dumped it outside as I didn’t go to pick it up. The government did not buy a single kilo. Where else will I take the potatoes?” he asked. In addition to the cost of the crop, which comes to around ₹6-8 per kg, Mr. Yadav would also have to pay ₹240 per quintal to the cold storage. “I still owe them money. They will squeeze it out from me next season or will not allow me to store my potatoes,” said Mr. Yadav.Last year, Uttar Pradesh produced 155 lakh metric tonnes of potatoes, the highest ever in the State. However, the bumper crop led to a slump in rates for farmers. To provide them relief, the Yogi Adityanath government launched a market intervention, under which the State agencies would purchase 1 lakh metric tonnes at a support price of ₹487 per quintal. However, farmers alleged that the State left them in the lurch.At best, only their best potatoes were selected, leaving the bulk of the produce at their disposal with few takers. Due to the State’s grading system, of a quintal on average only 20 kg of potatoes, the shiny, smooth, medium-sized ones, would be selected, said Kuldeep Singh, a farmer.Payment delays“What do I do with the rest? When we sell to the government, the payment involves a lengthy process as it is done through the bank. We are hard-pressed to pay the labour and settle our dues in cash. So we sell our produce to the traders, who may not give us satisfactory rates but are not so choosy about grading,” said Mr. Singh.According to a government official, 12,937 quintals of potatoes, the highest-ever, were purchased from farmers in April-May last year. This pushed up the rate for farmers by ₹100 per quintal. “But then farmers started getting more than the government price in the markets; so they stopped coming to us,” said S.P Joshi, Director, Uttar Pradesh horticulture department.And the price is at the core of the discontent. According to farmers, to grow 1 kg of potato, including costs of storage, required an investment of ₹8-9.Geetendra Yadav, a farmer-cum-activist, said the minimum cost to grow a kg of average-quality potatoes was ₹6.27, more than the ₹4.87 offered by the government.last_img read more

Health boost for KBK region

first_imgIn a bid to give fillip to health services in poverty-stricken KBK region of Odisha, the State government has proposed to establish 19 hospitals in 18 districts on public-private partnership mode.The Empowered Committee on Infrastructure, which met under the chairmanship of Chief Secretary Aditya Prasad Padhi here on Monday, decided to set up new quality care hospitals mostly in KBK (Kalahandi Balangir and Koraput) and KBK+ districts like Boudh, Kandhamal and Gajapati.“It was proposed to establish 19 hospitals in 18 districts chosen on the parameters of backwardness in health indicators. These hospitals would be of two categories. One type would be 100-bedded and another type would be 200-bedded,” said State Health Secretary P.K. Meherda.Sops galore“The government would provide land at concessional rate and other infrastructural facilities and the tariff of treatment in these hospitals would be decided by the government. The private parties would make necessary investments for setting up the hospitals and they would bring in more specialists and clinical professionals,” the Health Secretary informed. The State government organised an investors’ conference to get inputs from interested parties regarding the feasibility of the project and the methods of its operation. Around 71 organisations participated in the event and expressed interest to invest in the project.Sources in the Health Department said the project would create direct employment opportunity for 9,500 people while total private sector investment would be around ₹1,150 crore.last_img read more

Militans, Army exchange fire in Bandipora

first_imgSecurity forces and militants exchanged fire briefly on Thursday night in north Kashmir’s Bandipora, the second such incident since the Centre declared to halt operations during Ramzan in Kashmir two days ago.Preliminary reports suggest the incident took place around 1:30 a.m. near Bonikhan Mohalla Hajin, Bandipora. A police official said the Army’s 13 Rashrtiya Rifles patrolling apparently “came under the fire”. The Army retaliated and the area was cordoned off later. No casualty was reported.The police and the Army issued no statement on the details of the firing incident.The incident took place a day after a civilian was killed by the militants in the area, said the police. The victim, Hilal Ahmad Parray from Bandipora’s Hajin, was abducted and killed in a plant nursery. “Three to four Pakistan-based militants assisted by a local militant Saleem Parray affiliated with the outlawed militant organization Lashkar-e-Taiba forcefully abducted Parray,” the police claimed.Since the start of the unilateral halting of operations against militants in J&K, three major incidents of militancy have occurred, which include an exchange of fire in Shopian on Wednesday afternoon and stealing of three weapons from a police post in Srinagar’s Dalgate area on Thursday evening.last_img read more

ScienceShot: Early Musical Training Staves Off Hearing Loss

first_imgAfter spending thousands of dollars on music lessons and instruments for their children, parents often watch in dismay as once-coveted flutes, clarinets, and violins are unceremoniously abandoned. Such investments in early musical education may not be wasted, however. New research suggests that even after going decades without practicing their instruments, lapsed musicians have sharper ears. To compare hearing ability in former musicians to people who never played an instrument, researchers measured the electrical brain activity produced by a type of auditory processing called “neural timing,” which enables people to respond to split-second changes in sound such as the transition from a consonant to a vowel. This ability declines with age and is key to interpreting speech (hence the need to speak slowly and sometimes repeat words when speaking to the elderly). Compared with their nonmusical peers, adults aged 55 to 76 who had studied music for 4 to 14 years as youngsters had more precise neural timing, even though they hadn’t practiced in nearly 40 years, the team reports today in The Journal of Neuroscience. The more years that participants in the study had spent playing an instrument, the more accurate their brain responses, the researchers say. Although previous research has shown that playing music can improve hearing skills, they claim that this is the first study to show such long-term benefits.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

U.S. Park Service Nixes Immediate Genetic Rescue of Isle Royale Wolves

first_imgThe next chapter in the long-running scientific story of Michigan’s Isle Royale wolves will not include a dramatic genetic rescue. After 2 years of consideration, the National Park Service (NPS) announced this week that it will not introduce mainland wolves to revive the genetically inbred and declining wolf population on the isolated island. “The decision is not to intervene as long as there is a breeding population,” Isle Royale National Park Superintendent Phyllis Green tells ScienceInsider.   Isle Royale, in Lake Superior, is a wilderness area where hands-off management has been the rule. But a recent record decline in wolf numbers—and ripple effects on the island’s moose and forest—convinced researchers studying the predator-prey system that genetic rescue of the wolves was an ecological necessity. The decision not to introduce wolves is disappointing to many scientists who have consulted with NPS about its plan. Wildlife ecologist Rolf Peterson of Michigan Technological University (MTU) in Houghton, who has been studying the Isle Royale wolves since 1970, notes that the park service announcement makes no mention of ecosystem functioning or health. He and MTU collaborator John Vucetich are planning a response to the NPS decision, which they will release next week. It will accompany their annual report on this winter’s fieldwork, the 56th year of the study. “I’m sure the word disappointed will be in our statement,” Peterson says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Evolutionary biologist Robert Wayne of the University of California, Los Angeles, one of several scientists involved in early consultations with the park service, takes a similar view. A fresh infusion of wolves also would have provided researchers with an unusual opportunity for experimental work, he says, adding that such studies could be useful in understanding other isolated and threatened wildlife populations worldwide. “Maybe it’s too much to ask the [park service] to do an experiment,” he says.But U.S. Geological Survey wildlife biologist L. David Mech, who began his career studying Isle Royale wolves, thinks NPS made the right call by continuing what he calls “watchful waiting.”NPS says it will reconsider a genetic rescue if, for example, all the male or female wolves die, or if moose overbrowse the island’s vegetation. It issued no analysis or report in support of its decision, which is part of a larger management planning and environmental impact statement exercise, but Green says details of the plan will be forthcoming this fall. The management plan for the island will include efforts to model how climate change will interact with the wolves, moose, and vegetation.The birth last summer of three pups to Isle Royale wolves was a factor in the decision, Green says. The pups survived into the brutal winter, although two adults did not. That puts the official count of the island’s wolves at nine. The moose, meanwhile, have doubled in number over the past 3 years. “We’ve already lost the ecological value of wolves,” Peterson says, because the predators can no longer cull the moose herd to keep its numbers in check. A new analysis by Vucetich, Peterson, and others correlates a decline in the wolves’ predation of moose with an increase in wolf inbreeding. The wolf population is clearly inbred and showing signs of skeletal deformities that may be a factor contributing to the reduced moose predation. But a separate DNA analysis to be published soon in Conservation Genetics, based on wolf blood and scat collected over the past decade, argues that the wolves have not been as isolated as typically thought. In 1997, an immigrant from the mainland joined the population and its genes became predominant in the island population, a well-documented and now widely known event. In addition, researchers now argue that other mainland wolves may have done the same in earlier winters, when ice formed more commonly between the island and Canada, but went undetected.An ice bridge formed again this past winter, the first time since 2008, and lasted 16 days. Researchers did not observe any newcomers to the island, but for the first time did document wolf traffic in the reverse direction. One of the radio-collared adults lost from Isle Royale, a lone female nicknamed Isabelle, was found dead on 8 February on the northeastern Minnesota shore. Autopsy later revealed the cause of death: a pellet gunshot in the chest.last_img read more

Greenhouse emissions similar to today’s may have triggered massive temperature rise in Earth’s past

first_imgAbout 55.5 million years ago, a burst of carbon dioxide raised Earth’s temperature 5°C to 8°C, which had major impacts on numerous species of plants and wildlife. Scientists analyzing ancient soil samples now say a previous burst of the greenhouse gas preceded this event, known as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), and probably triggered it. Moreover, they believe humans are pumping similar levels of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere right now, raising concerns that our own emissions may also destabilize Earth’s climate, triggering the planet to emit devastating bursts of carbon in the future.The paper implies that even if we stopped emitting carbon dioxide right now, our descendants might still face huge temperature rises, says paleoclimatologist Gabriel Bowen of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, the lead author of the new research. “It is a possibility,” he says, “and it’s a scary one.”Scientists accept that a massive injection of carbon into the atmosphere caused the PETM, but they don’t agree about where the gas came from. Some researchers say it originated from the release of carbon locked up under the ocean by an undersea landslide; others blame a comet crashing into Earth, causing carbon from both the comet and Earth to be oxidized to carbon dioxide and potentially causing wildfires or burning of carbon-rich peat bogs on Earth. They also don’t know how long the release lasted, with recent estimates ranging from 10 years to 20,000 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)One of the best ways to measure the prehistoric release of carbon into the atmosphere is to look at the ratio of two types of carbon atoms called isotopes. Carbon has two stable isotopes: About 99% of natural carbon is carbon-12, whereas the remaining 1% is mainly the heavier carbon-13, with trace amounts of radioactive carbon-14 that decay within a few thousand years to nitrogen. Living organisms have a slight preference for the lighter isotope, so carbon derived from organic sources (such as fossil fuels) is slightly depleted in carbon-13. If that carbon gets returned to the atmosphere at a faster rate than normal, atmospheric carbon dioxide has less carbon-13 than normal. Plants taking up this carbon dioxide become even more carbon-13 depleted, and when they decompose, this depletion is recorded in the soil.Sedimentary rock samples that have been compacted from soils formed at the time of the PETM contain less carbon-13 than normal. Sedimentary rocks of the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming contain one of the best records of soils from this period. Geologists have studied them for more than 100 years, but to obtain samples from soils of different periods, geologists had to analyze surface rocks from different parts of the basin and try to piece together a continuous geological history. Therefore, the Bighorn Basin Coring Project, run by the University of New Hampshire, Durham, drilled approximately 1 km of core from each of three different points in the basin to give geologists three clear, continuous records of how the soils had varied over time in a particular place.Bowen and colleagues analyzed one of these cores, tracking the variations in carbon isotope ratios in greater detail than had been previously possible by examining surface rocks. They report online today in Nature Geoscience that in soils beneath those laid down during the main rise in temperature about 55.5 million years ago, there was a distinct drop in the proportion of carbon-13. In soils immediately on top of these, the ratio seemed to recover to its normal value. Finally, soils on top of these showed a large drop in the proportion of carbon-13 corresponding to the PETM itself.So what was going on? The researchers concluded that there must have been two separate releases of carbon. The first, smaller release, about 2000 years before the main temperature rise, was followed by a recovery to normal climatic conditions. Later, a second, larger pulse caused the main event. “I’m fairly convinced that they’re related,” Bowen says. “We see nothing remotely similar during the many hundreds of thousands of years before this event. To have within a few thousand years these two major carbon isotope shifts and have that be circumstantial would be quite remarkable.”The researchers used climate models to investigate how the initial, smaller heating could have triggered the later surge in temperature. They estimate that the first thermal pulse is likely to have warmed Earth’s atmosphere by 2°C to 3°C, but that the atmospheric temperature would have gradually returned to normal as the heat was absorbed into the deep ocean. However, when that heat finally reached the ocean floor, it might have melted methane ices called clathrates, releasing the methane into the ocean and allowing it to make its way into the atmosphere. As a greenhouse gas, methane is 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide, so a sudden spike in methane emissions could lead to huge climate change.“The connection between these two pulses is something that it’s going to be really important to get a handle on,” Bowen says. The researchers believe the rate at which carbon dioxide escaped into the atmosphere during both bursts is unlikely to have been greater than the rate at which humans are emitting it now, and it may have been considerably lower. “Carbon release back then looked a lot like human fossil fuel emissions today,” Bowen says. “So we might learn a lot about the future from changes in climate, plants, and animal communities 55.5 million years ago.”“We think this is really good news for our contention that the release of carbon was very fast,” says marine geologist James Wright of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, an advocate of the comet impact hypothesis.Wright is not convinced, however, about the importance of the first pulse in triggering the second. He suggests that the most logical interpretation of the apparent cooling after the first pulse is that its significance was less than Bowen’s group believes, with limited effect on the overall ocean temperature, and that not just the atmosphere but rather the entire planet quickly returned to normal. “If that’s the case, then the first has nothing to do with the second,” Wright says. That, in turn, would require an alternative explanation for the PETM such as a comet impact.last_img read more

Human error led to sinking of Taiwanese research vessel

first_imgThe sinking of Taiwan’s Ocean Researcher V last fall resulted from human error, the head of the country’s Maritime and Port Bureau told local press this week. The 10 October accident claimed the lives of two researchers and rendered the dedicated marine research ship a total loss.Barely a day into a cruise to study atmospheric pollution, Ocean Researcher V headed back to port because of bad weather. The ship drifted off course, struck two submerged reefs, and sank near the Penghu Islands, about 260 kilometers southwest of Taipei in the Taiwan Strait. Most of the 27 researchers and students and 18 crew were rescued. But Shih-Chieh Hsu, the cruise’s chief scientist, and Yi-Chun Lin, an engineering assistant, drowned.Wen-chung Chi, director-general of the Maritime and Port Bureau, said that a review of the ship’s voyage data recorder and other evidence indicated that the crew should have been alerted that the ship had drifted off course. A comprehensive report on the accident is due to be released next week.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The 2700-ton, 72.6-meter-long ship had been in service under the Taiwan Ocean Research Institute (TORI) in Kaohsiung for less than 2 years. The availability of the well-equipped, ocean-going vessel had led to an expansion of Taiwan’s marine research programs and international collaborations. TORI Director Hui-Ling Lin tells ScienceInsider that the agency will have a similar ship built to replace Ocean Researcher V; construction “will be initiated as soon as we receive the settlement of the insurance claim,” she says.To bridge the gap, TORI plans to acquire a new, smaller vessel for temporary use. The agency has designs on a half-built ship that’s now in the shipyard, Lin says: “The original design has to be changed in order to install instruments.”last_img read more

Video: Microbe tornadoes create ‘living crystals’

first_imgScientists have discovered the first “living crystal” formed by a microbe—the speedy Thiovulum majus, one of the fastest swimming species of bacteria known. These bacteria live in the muddy bottoms of salt marshes and produce energy by oxidizing sulfide. Researchers discovered that when the bacteria hit the edge of a container, they move along its surface and eventually aggregate into ordered, 2D formations. The microbes generate a tornadolike flow with their spinning flagella, which pull nearby bacteria toward them, causing them to arrange in crystalline clumps, they report in a paper to be published in Physical Review Letters. Whereas most crystals are inert structures, these crystals rearrange and rotate over time, as shown in the video above, thanks to the forces each bacterium exerts on its neighbors. Scientists don’t yet know if these bacteria form such crystals in their natural environment or whether there are potential applications for the result, but, says physicist Alexander Petroff of Rockefeller University in New York City, first author of the study, “it is still a great incentive to play in the mud and do math.”(Video credit: Xiao-Lun Wu)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

New South Wales, India Announce $1.6M Partnership to Promote Startups and Tech Businesses

first_imgAustralia’s startup capital New South Wales (NSW) is looking “India-ward” for partnerships and collaborations to create new jobs in its tech and advanced manufacturing sectors.NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian, who’s on a trade mission to the country, has announced a $1.6 million two-year partnership between NSW and India for this purpose. Related Itemslast_img

No Foreign Love For HDFC Bank May Be Bad News For Indian Stocks

first_imgEven with a prime opportunity to buy shares of HDFC Bank Ltd. foreign investors aren’t biting, and that may signal that sentiment on Indian equities has turned sour, according to Arihant Capital Ltd.Read it at Bloomberg Related Itemslast_img

Kenya Trains Sight On India, Spain Tourists

first_imgKenya Tourism Board (KTB), has set its sights on India and Spain as it seeks to grow the number of tourists from the Asian and European states.The State agency said it would lead more than 10 Kenyan local travel agents on a marketing mission in the two countries.“Ten Kenyan travel trade partners will pitch a tent from January 23-25 at the Bombay Exhibition Centre in Mumbai, India, to woo travellers to Kenya at the Outbound Travel Mart,” said CEO Betty Radier.Read it at Business Daily Related Itemslast_img read more

Welcome To My World

first_imgOver the years, telemarketers have called me Karate, Mrs. Siiinje, and Arathiya more times than I care to remember. Depending on my mood, I either stifle a giggle or roll my eyes. But I rarely bother to correct them; I just carry on with the business of the call, exchange thank-you’s and hang up.But then Bangalore came calling. And with it, hundreds of U.S. companies moved their call center operations to the land of my forefathers. Now, when I am retrieving my credit card balance or ordering a cheese grater over the phone, I am greeted with “Good evening Mrs. ‘Sing,’” or “Your first name is A-R-A-T-I-‘Arthy’?”“Yes!, Yes!” I want to exclaim!” If phones could hug, mine would outhug Barney the Dinosaur. After 30 plus years of hearing 30 plus permutations of my name, it is a breath of fresh air to hear someone get it right the first time, with no explanation whatsoever. I can’t believe I missed out on this simple joy that my friends Jane, Donna and Ann have relished all these years.I am so charmed by this recent development, that I actually perk up when my caller ID shows that my satellite TV company is calling to sell me more channels. Their operators are always Indian. “Who will it be this time?” I wonder. Sometimes I imagine the operator resembles my cousin Raj, drinking hot chai, sitting under a banyan tree while he runs through the merits of a high definition DVR.Other times the operator evokes images of my cousin Gayatri, with waist-length coconut-smelling hair and (horror of horrors) yet unmarried, but always full of laughter. “Are you interested in upgrading to the sports package?” she asks. Instead, I want to ask her which Bollywood hero she thinks is cuter – Shah Rukh Khan or Hrithik Roshan?Sometimes the calls come while I’m cooking dinner. The operator might be droning on about extending my contract, but all I want to do is to stop the conversation to ask, “By the way, how much garam masala do you add to your dal makhni?”So, while outsourcing might stoke the ire of some, I am thrilled by the unexpected, sporadic connections to the motherland -“Desh” as we Indians call it. (Sure, I was born in New Jersey, but really, what is Jersey than a far suburb of Delhi?)Of course, I had to laugh when my old college roommate – a lifetime North Carolinian – recently complained to me that when she recently called her credit card company and the Indian accented operator kept calling her Way-lee-ray.“Valerie,” I said. “Welcome to my world.”  Related Itemslast_img read more