Go back to the enewsletter Nature lovers are spoil

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterNature lovers are spoilt for choice with two new members of Small Luxury Hotels of the World (SLH) in Malaysia and the United Kingdom joining the luxury brand this month. City-break seekers will also be excited with two new members in the cities of London and Tuscany, both rich in cultural and shopping options.The newcomers include:Mangala Resort & Spa, Kuantan, Malaysia65 rooms from MYR1,200 per nightMangala Resort & Spa is the result of a 15-year journey of rejuvenation, which transformed an abandoned barren mining land into a tropical oasis of palm plantation, organic gardens, rehabilitated lakes and undisturbed wetlands. From the private villas built on stilts over the lake to those beside lily-dotted wetlands, every inch of this award-winning luxury resort built with eco-conscious materials brings guests closer to nature, which is within the vicinity of Gambang Water Park and Bukit Gambang Safari Park – Wild Savannah. Wherever you are, melodic bird calls fill the air, adding to the sense of natural tranquillity and eco-luxury. Palazzo Vecchietti, Florence, Tuscany, Italy14 Rooms from €373 per nightImmerse yourself in Florence’s golden age at Palazzo Vecchietti, a 16th-century palace among the grandeur of the historic centre. Original 16th-century features and artworks are woven into the contemporary-classic interiors by renowned Florentine interior designer Michele Bonan throughout this intimate luxury residence. Within an easy 10-minute stroll from the hotel’s central location are some of Florence’s best cultural sights and retail offerings; the Duomo, Ponte Vecchio, Bargello museum, Palazzo Vecchio and prime shopping street Via Tornabuoni are just around the corner. Pets are also very much welcomed here, too, pampered with ‘pet sets’ of treats and toys. The Academy, London, United Kingdom50 rooms from £287 per nightTucked away in the heart of Bloomsbury in London’s bustling West End, the Grade-II listed Academy Hotel comprises a collection of five Georgian townhouses combined into one charming luxury hotel, owned by YTL Hotels. Following an extensive refurbishment, headed up by New York-based Champalimaud Design, all bedrooms and suites have been elegantly revamped with stylish furnishings, marble ensuite shower rooms and vintage pieces to create a contemporary take on townhouse living. Downstairs, the intimate Alchemy Bar is the perfect retreat for bespoke cocktails, specialty gins or a refreshing glass of wine or champagne. Quintessentially British, the hotel offers a range of traditional pastimes including afternoon tea served in the private courtyard garden and exclusive access to the hotel’s library which houses a curated collection of classic and contemporary novels, paying homage to the famous Bloomsbury Set. Just moments away from the British Museum, fine-dining restaurants and designer shops, The Academy is perfectly positioned for those travelling for business or pleasure.Lead image: Bloomsbury Suite, The Academy, LondonGo back to the enewslettercenter_img The Fish Hotel, Broadway, United Kingdom63 rooms from £194 per nightSurrounded by the rolling hills and honey-stone villages of the 160-hectare Farncombe Estate, The Fish is a country hotel with a stylish twist. Designed as a village-style collection of houses, huts and hideaways, The Fish can be any kind of luxury break you desire. Enjoy a romantic weekend in a stylish suite or secluded hillside hut with its own private hot tub. Plan a family getaway in a contemporary treehouse in the woods. Or book out a whole farmhouse for an adventure with friends and four-legged companions, complete with group activities spanning archery to Segway safaris. Families with young children will find plenty of fun and games to keep them busy, including a woodland playground. Then as evening falls, follow your nose to Hook, which serves up market-fresh seafood, including Cornish mussels and lobster.last_img read more

Researchers examine Twitter conversations to understand thoughts concerning OpenAPS technology

first_img With OpenAPS, self-reported A1C and glucose variability improved. OpenAPS reduced the daily distress and burden associated with diabetes. OpenAPS is perceived as safe. Interactions with health care providers concerning OpenAPS. How to adapt OpenAPS technology for individual user needs. To date, more than 700 diabetes patients are using OpenAPS to manage their diabetes. One participant likened OpenAPS to having an autopilot on an aircraft. While the patient still has to manage their diabetes, OpenAPS has reduced some of the burden of care. Some tweets include:”Finding OpenAPS literally changed my life. My numbers have been astounding. Last A1C was 5.4!”Related StoriesDiabetes medications mask euglycemic ketoacidosis at the time of surgeryIntermittent fasting may regulate blood glucose levels even without weight lossUTHealth researchers investigate how to reduce stress-driven alcohol use”Boring glucose is beautiful [photo of CGM with a flat glucose pattern for the previous 3 hours]””For those times when I’ve lost [connection to] CGM readings… fallback [to standard] basal.””Citizen scientists from all over the world are coming together to enhance existing diabetes technology,” Litchman said. “They are not waiting for solutions. They are making solutions to help themselves manage their diabetes with more ease.”Although the Twitter analysis exposes an active community that is exploring their options, there are limitations to the study, according to Litchman. It was not constructed using an experimental design or prospective cross-sectional data. In addition, the community participating in the conversation has a vested interest in OpenAPS. Social pressure may compel community participants to only post positive experiences with OpenAPS, reflecting a potential positive bias in the conversation.”There are some unknowns about this type of technology,” Litchman said. “While there are obvious benefits to many people who are using OpenAPS, there are some areas that may be concerning.”Patients do not need a prescription to create and use OpenAPS. They do not have a trained professional diabetes educator to help set up and train the user about the technology, a common practice when initially starting a new FDA-approved diabetes technology such as an insulin pump or CGM. Additionally, many of the hackable insulin pumps are no longer for sale through the device maker, opening a black market for used products.This do-it-yourself (DIY) system is not regulated or approved by the FDA or device manufacturers of the altered insulin pump or CGM; however, the FDA is currently exploring OpenAPS technology as another option for diabetes management.The pancreas produces the hormones (insulin and glucagon) that help regulate blood sugar. When this organ does not function properly, the body cannot control blood sugar effectively, leading to diabetes.”The open artificial pancreas system is the next technological frontier of diabetes,” said Kelly L. Close, Founder, The DiaTribe Foundation,an organization that seeks to empower readers with useful, actionable information that helps make sense of diabetes. “It promises to transform all aspects of care and create opportunities that no other therapy can approach. I take nothing for granted, but if successful, it will normalize a condition that has bedeviled humanity for thousands of years.” Ms. Close was not involved in this study. Source:https://healthcare.utah.edu/publicaffairs/news/2018/09/twitter-openaps.phpcenter_img Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 11 2018The diabetes online community is leading grassroots efforts focused on accelerating the development, access and adoption of diabetes-related tools to manage the disease. Researchers at University of Utah Health examined the community’s online Twitter conversation to understand their thoughts concerning open source artificial pancreas (OpenAPS) technology. The results of this study are available online in the September 10 issue of the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology.”There is a large community that is actively exploring how they can manage their diabetes using off-label solutions,” says Michelle Litchman, Ph.D., FNP-BC, FAANP, an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at U of U Health and first author on the paper. “Health care providers, industry and the FDA need to understand the wants and needs of people with diabetes in order to better serve them. OpenAPS was created out of a need for better solutions.”For the diabetes community, OpenAPS has been touted as an ideal technology for managing their illness. The off-label technology combines an off-the-shelf continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and insulin pump that interact to minimize glucose variability.Before the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first technology to bridge these two devices in 2017, the community took matters into their own hands. They hacked into current CGMs and older insulin pumps and developed open source code to get the two devices to speak to one another, creating an OpenAPS. By crowdsourcing their code hacks, the community has improved this approach for blood sugar management.Litchman and colleagues followed the #OpenAPS hashtag on Twitter to understand how the community is discussing this option.After surveying more than 3,000 tweets using the #OpenAPS hashtag, generated by more than 300 participants from January 2016 to January 2018, Litchman found five overarching themes circulating around the community.last_img read more