Syracuse defense misses out on 3 interceptions, allows 2 big plays in loss to Maryland

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 22, 2014 at 12:10 am Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbb The Syracuse secondary yielded two lengthy, game-changing plays — and couldn’t create any of its own.Potential momentum-changers presented themselves in the form of three errant passes, but the Orange couldn’t haul in any of them in its 34-20 loss to Maryland in the Carrier Dome on Saturday. SU held the Terrapins’ receivers to two receptions longer than 30 yards, but they were pivotal.“I never felt like we gave ourselves a push in momentum throughout the course of the game to get on track,” head coach Scott Shafer said.The Terrapins’ first score of the day came on a well-placed 25-yard pass to the back of the end zone by quarterback C.J. Brown to receiver Marcus Leak, who beat SU cornerback Julian Whigham on a straight go route.UMD’s second touchdown came on a bubble screen from its own 10-yard line. A hole formed for Brandon Ross to shoot past four SU defenders and he took it 90 yards to the house.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I saw it developing,” safety Darius Kelly said. “The receivers did some blocking downfield, a good job of chopping us down and they got a play on us.”With Maryland ahead 14-13 early in the second quarter, Brown aired out a pass down the left sideline for Leak, who ran another go route with SU cornerback Brandon Reddish blanketing him.Reddish had his hands on the ball first, but Leak took a step infield before the pass came down and ripped it from Reddish’s grasp as the two tumbled to the turf at SU’s 17-yard line, a 46-yard pickup.The SU senior threw his hands around in frustration as Leak popped up pounding his chest.“It kind of haunts you for the rest of the game until the next time you get an opportunity,” Kelly said. “It makes us hungry to get the next one.”Kelly himself missed out on a pick, running downfield with his back to the line of scrimmage and an overthrown pass tipped his outstretched hands.Another chance for an interception eluded the Orange when, on Maryland’s next drive, SU nose tackle Eric Crume, running out toward the left flat, let a pass straight to him fall through his hands and incomplete.Said linebacker Cameron Lynch: “I just tell them they owe me one. They owe the team one and I think they’ll get them.” Commentslast_img read more

Trial that could reshape college athletics begins

first_imgIn this Sept. 18, 2010, file photo, former UCLA basketball player Ed O’Bannon Jr. sits in his office in Henderson, Nev. Five years after the former UCLA star filed his antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA, it goes to trial Monday, June 9, 2014, in a California courtroom. (AP Photo/Isaac Brekken, File) Some believe it could upend the way college sports operate. Others say Ed O’Bannon’s legal crusade against the NCAA already has.Five years after the former UCLA star filed his antitrust lawsuit against the NCAA, it goes to trial Monday in a California courtroom. The stakes are high in the biggest challenge yet to the NCAA’s authority to operate college sports at a time when big money makes so-called “amateur” sports look an awful like the pros.Here’s a look at the issues surrounding the case:Q. What is this trial about?A. The NCAA is being sued by O’Bannon and others over the use of their images in broadcasts and video games without compensation. They will argue at trial that the NCAA has acted as a cartel in violation of federal antitrust laws by conspiring to keep players from making money while at the same time pocketing billions of dollars in big television contracts. The NCAA contends that rules on “amateurism” are necessary to retain competitive balance and that a successful lawsuit could create a free-for-all that will seriously damage college athletics.Q. What are the plaintiffs asking for?A.  In the short term, not much. The 20 named plaintiffs dropped their demands for money in damages a few weeks before the trial in a strategic move to narrow the scope of the case. But they are asking for the judge to rule in their favor and issue an injunction that would prohibit the NCAA from enforcing rules against paying players for the use of their images in broadcasts. Lawyers for the plaintiffs will also argue they deserve reimbursement for legal fees that they said exceeded $30 million even before the trial. “Just to get to trial alone is huge,” said Jon King, an attorney handling several related cases. “To obtain an injunction will be revolutionary.”Q. Why would a win be so important?A. This is the first time a challenge to the way the NCAA operates has gotten this far. It is part of a broader effort to change the way major college sports are operated that includes several other lawsuits challenging various NCAA regulations and a unionization effort that won a vote for football players at Northwestern earlier this year. Plaintiffs and others claim that there is no real amateurism in a college sports industry where coaches make millions, administrators are well paid and everyone profits except the athletes providing the labor. “O’Bannon represents a watershed moment for the NCAA,” said Northeastern University School of Law professor Roger Abrams, an expert in sports and antitrust law. “When combined with the Northwestern football team unionization effort, the case raises the question whether the NCAA must totally re-conceptualize its approach to regulating college athletics.”Q. What will we find out during trial?A. There will be a lot of testimony about the huge amounts of money coming into college sports, literally billions of dollars for the conferences and the NCAA from television rights deals. At least two conferences — The Big 12 and Conference USA — made last-minute challenges in court to keep their television deals secret, arguing they would be at a competitive disadvantage if other conferences and schools knew exactly what the terms of those deals are. There will also be testimony on the NCAA side about the many benefits athletes get while in college, including tuition, room and board and tutors to help them get degrees.Q. Will other athletes, say swimmers or golfers, get something from this?A. No, the class-action suit is limited to football players and Division I basketball players. Those two sports are the biggest revenue generators for colleges.Q. Why haven’t they settled?A. The NCAA says it can’t budge on the fundamental question of paying players, because doing so would upend the model of college sports. The organization also believes many of the lawsuits are lawyer-driven and says athletes are treated better than ever and happier than ever. The plaintiffs did reach a separate settlement with videogame maker EA Sports and the Collegiate for $40 million that will allow some payments to former players. The NCAA dismissed that by saying “the real benefactors of this settlement are the lawyers, who could pocket more than $15 million.”Q. Will this lead to pay-for-play in college sports?A.  Not right away, though the pressure brought by unionization attempts and lawsuits has already led to proposals for the five biggest college conferences to increase scholarship money and change other rules to benefit athletes. Attorneys for the plaintiffs say the whole college sports system doesn’t need to be blown up, but there are remedies that will help athletes prosper while at the same time keeping a structure to control college athletics. They’re suggesting the establishment of a trust funded by the NCAA and its schools that would take money for the use of player images and dole it out to individual players — but only after they’re done with school. “Notwithstanding the NCAA’s conjecture that the sky will fall, an unfettered market will not bring college athletics to a halt,” attorneys for the plaintiffs wrote in a trial brief.last_img read more

Gateway High school basketball coach resigns amid charges

first_imgTRAFFORD, Pa. (AP) – A prominent Western Pennsylvania high school basketball coach has resigned after police charged him with making threats and harassing a neighbor.The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (http://bit.ly/1zo2FT6 ) reports that Gateway coach Mitch Adams resigned Sunday. Adams led the team to championships in 2011 and 2012, and had been a basketball coach at the school for nine years.The 56-year-old Adams told the newspaper he’s innocent, but he didn’t want the issue to become a distraction for the school and the team.Adams was charged by Trafford police on Aug. 11 over an incident that occurred near his home on July 13. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Sept. 23.Gateway athletic director Randy Rovesti says the school thanks Adams for his years of service, and wishes him well.last_img read more

Westport Winery Earns Three Platinum Medals in Best of the Best…

first_imgSubmitted by Westport Winery Just in time for Christmas, Westport Winery learned that three of their wines had earned Platinum medals in Wine Press Northwest’s 2013 Best of the Best Platinum Judging.Bog Berry Blush, a blend of Gewurztraminer and cranberry, benefiting the WSU Cranberry Research Station and Museum in Long Beach was one of the big winners. Captain Grays Gewurztraminer made with grapes from Red Willow Vineyards in the Yakima AVA brought top honors along with benefiting the Grays Harbor Symphony. The label for this wine was created by Westport watercolorist Barbara Sampson. Boat Shed Red a blend of Petite Sirah from Jones Vineyard in the Wahluke Slope AVA and Sangiovese from Red Willow Vineyards, produced by Westport Winery under the Maritime Wines brand, was the third honoree with a label featuring work by Tokeland artist Wally Mann.This is an invitational event for wines that won gold medals this year in international competitions from wineries in Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Idaho. From there the wines were evaluated in a blind taste testing at the Clover Island Inn in Kennewick, Washington in October.Both Bog Berry Blush and Captain Grays Gewurztraminer are available for tasting at the winery. Boat Shed Red has been sold out for several months.In addition to these medals announced in the Winter 2013/2014 issue of Wine Press Northwest, the publication includes an article by Andy Perdue, titled More Than A Winery, which includes numerous quotes by Westport’s co-owner Kim Roberts, regarding her family’s strategies in creating what has been voted Best in the Northwest Winery and Wine Destination.Westport Winery, Restaurant, Bakery and Nursery are open daily at 11a.m. The winery is open for lunch daily from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and for dinner on Friday and Saturday evenings from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. The winery with its unique grape maze, extraordinary outdoor sculptures, and display gardens is located on the corner of Highway 105 and South Arbor Road halfway between Westport and Aberdeen. For more information, call Westport Winery at 360-648-2224. Facebook0Tweet0Pin0last_img read more