Students launch Wells Project at ’SC

first_imgFor the next 10 days, more than 200 USC students will drink only tap water as they participate in the Wells Project.The money saved from not drinking other beverages will be donated to Rwandan communities to provide clean, safe water through Living Water International.Water · Funds raised by the Wells Project finance the construction of wells throughout Africa. This well was built in a Ghana village. – Photo courtesy of Living Water InternationalThe Wells Project, founded at Texas A&M University in 2007, was created to give college students an opportunity to improve the water crisis in Africa. The Wells Project has since partnered with Living Water International, an organization founded in 1990 devoted to providing potable water sources to African villages; the organization has established 30 chapters at universities throughout the nation.Lindsey Caldwell, co-founder of USC’s Well Project, said USC’s chapter’s goal is to involve the entire campus in the 10-day event.“We all agreed we wanted the Wells Project to unite the campus, not segregate or become an exclusive organization,” Caldwell said in an email. “As we are starting out, we have everyone from engineering students to Greek students to athletes.”Different chapters each made a video to promote the project this year, and junior quarterback Matt Barkley represented USC.USC Wells Project has set a goal of raising $10,000 this year, and 100 percent of funds will go toward the construction of wells in Rwanda.Living Water International will drill wells in Rwanda with the funds raised and participants will receive a Wells Report that includes pictures and statistical information about the wells. The report will include coordinates so that participants can view the well through Google Earth.Caldwell said she founded the USC chapter of Wells Project after hearing about the program’s successes elsewhere and decided to bring the project to USC to raise awareness of the international water shortage and provide a platform for students to help solve the problem.“I heard about the camaraderie it brought to the campus and the sheer joy the members had when they reached their fundraising goals,” Caldwell said. “I wanted that for USC. I wanted students to feel like they were making a difference, [and could] unite campus and help change the world.”Lainey Barkley, a sophomore majoring in human performance and a participant in the project, said she chose to take part in the Wells Project because it helps solve a severe global issue.“By giving up something that is not a necessity in my life, I am being a part of bringing a necessity to someone else,” Barkley said. “It is also a good reminder, each time I deny myself a drink I want, that I have been given all I need and have everything to be grateful for.”Heidi Ippolito, a senior majoring in cinema television and critical studies and a project participant, said it will be difficult to give up other beverages, but she is confident the project will have a positive impact on her life.“Missing my daily coffee and tea will certainly be a challenge, but it is a challenge that I hope will remind me of my own blessings,” Ippolito said.The Wells Project will set up information tables on Trousdale Parkway today and Wednesday. Participants will be selling shirts and food items and giving away wristbands and fliers. Participants also plan to raise awareness by carrying five-gallon jugs in a water walk from the Finger Fountain to the statue of Traveler.last_img read more

A Bus Stop That’s Just the Ticket in Sea Bright

first_imgBy Eileen MoonSEA BRIGHT – Waiting for the bus in Sea Bright is a lot more fun than it used to be thanks to the talents of Monmouth Beach artist Megan Health Gilhool.Like most people who live close to the ocean, she’s driven up and down Ocean Ave more times than she can count.And as she traveled, she couldn’t help but see her surroundings with an artist’s eye.In the right hands, a little paint and TLC could work wonders, Megan knew.Take the bus stop, for instance.Every time she passed it, she thought about how the workaday building that provided bus riders a place to get out of the weather as they waited could use a facelift.Or, as Megan put it, “Every time I walked by it, I just thought it needed a big hug – a big, paint hug!”Several years ago, she approached the borough about the possibility of painting the bus shelter, but at that time, no one was interested.She tried again this year however, and with the support of the Sea Bright Business Alliance, she got the green light.A fine artist whose abstracts have been featured in numerous art shows and galleries, Gilhool also does commissioned work that includes everything from family and pet portraits to tromp l’oeil murals in business and private homes.And as the bus stop illustrates, she spends a lot of time planning and conceiving her designs.She spent more than three weeks on the bus shelter project, setting up her paints and supplies and taking them down each day when she was finished. I don’t travel light,” she said.As she worked, she encountered a number of people who asked questions and commented on what she was doing. One business owner across the street often sat on a chair on the sidewalk watching her work.Some found her color choices too bright, Gilhool said. “They wanted it to look Nantuckety. But this is Sea Bright. What about New Jersey? New Jersey has its own life, its own spirit.”Like most folks blessed to call the two river area home, Gilhool has a deep love for and appreciation of the ocean, and that’s reflected in the whimsical interior of the bus stop, which is painted to resemble a comfy summer cottage by the sea.A trompe l’oeil Monmouth Beach artist Megan Heath Gilhool at work in Red Bank, where she recently painted a party room at the Red Bank ArmoryMonmouth Beach artist Megan Heath Gilhool waved her magic paintbrush over this bus stop on Ocean Avenue in Sea Bright recently, replacing the drab interior with a brightly painted evocation of a summer cottage at the shore.Waiting for the bus in Sea Bright is much more fun than it used to be thanks to the talents of Monmouth Beach artist Megan Heath Gilhool.sign inside the shelter reads, “May your joys be as deep as the ocean and your sorrows as light as its foam.”Gilhool researched a lot of beach-related sayings before settling on that one, she said.Painted “Magazines” with a beachy theme are also displayed in a basket with the name of one reading, “N.J. Shore Life,” as well as a painted copy of Sea Bright’s newsletter, “The Seabreeze,” with appropriate headlines.Such little whimsies are abundant, like the painting of Megan’s real-life cat Buster, sleeping on one wall – not far from his faux food dish.Inches from the bus shelter’s floor, there’s a painted “snapshot” of Ralph Kramden, the bombastic bus driver played by Jackie Gleason on the 1950s TV series, ***ITALSThe Honeymooners***ENDTALS.Thanks to Gilhool, commuters caught in the winter chill may enjoy a little bit of summer as they settle inside on the brightly painted bench to wait for the next bus.And now that the business community has added a little evergreen at the side of the shelter, the scene has taken on a Christmas-y feel as well.Since she finished painting the shelter, Gilhool has seen parents stopping in with their kids to take photos inside the stop, which always makes her smile.“It really was a fun project,” said Gilhool.last_img read more

Photographer Captures Iconic Image

first_imgIt was much more than another assignment for photographer Gary Gellman.Gellman was in Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia, on hand to photograph Pope Francis, capturing what posterity may eventually consider among the iconic images of the visit as well as allow him to get in touch with his spiritual side.“As a Catholic,” Gellman said, “being able to photograph the successor to St. Peter was really neat and a great honor.” Gellman, a Howell-based still photographer and videographer, was provided access to the tarmac for the plane’s arrival in Philadelphia, and captured the image of Francis blessing the 10-year-old disabled boy in his wheelchair. That photograph has already been widely distributed and seen.“It was very emotional,” Gellman offered.“And to me as a Catholic to be that close to the leader of the our church and to know I was selected and blessed to be selected to be there, the signature event,” he explained, “it was a wonderful experience.”Gellman has in the past photographed the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, has taken portrait photos of Diocese of Trenton Bishop David M. O’Connell and knows Archbishop Charles Chaput, with Archdiocese of Philadelphia, who helped Gellman along the lengthy process of obtaining security clearance for the assignment. That process took the better part of 10 months, beginning last November, to secure security clearance to be a photographer for the World Meeting of Families event, according to Gellman.
“I like to say it was a 10 month process and a 27-year training period,” he said, referring to his time as a professional in his field.On the airport tarmac as the jet arrived and the pope and passengers disembarked, “It was something quite unique to be blessed to be so close,” with only about 200 people there and only a couple of photographers – “probably the smallest group surrounding the pope during his visit.”At the time “I was in work mode,” concentrating on the assignment. “Until that one point,” with Pope Francis “coming down those steps, I realized where I was, what I was doing,” and it having a profound effect on him, he acknowledged.Over the years, Gellman has photographed many, including such celebs as Anne Hathaway, Heidi Klum, Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi and many others, especially in his role as photographer for the New Jersey Hall of Fame. “I’ve met a lot of cool people, many are special in their own right.“But this,” assignment, he stressed, “was one of a kind, really special.” By John Burtonlast_img read more

New Jersey Trivia for a Pandemic

first_imgThe article originally appeared in the May 7th – May 13th, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. 4. What are the three prominent tree species in Monmouth County forests? In 1609, Henry Hudson, and his crew aboard the Dutch vessel Half-Moon spotted land in what is now Monmouth County most likely off Sandy Hook; however, some historical accounts credit this landing to present-day Keansburg. According to legend, Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly, also known as “Molly Pitcher,” delivered water to her husband’s battery to cool the cannons and soldiers during the battle of Monmouth Court House in 1778. When her husband was wounded, Molly took her husband’s place as a member of the cannon crew for the remainder of the battle. Monmouth County is named for Monmouth, Wales. 3. From where does Monmouth County derive its name? COURTESY ELIZABETH WULFHORST The Sandy Hook Lighthouse 2. Who was Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly and what role did she play in New Jerseyand American history? The lighthouse on the northern tip of the Gateway National Recreation Area in SandyHook, built in 1764, is the oldest lighthouse still in operation in the U.S. 5. Who was the first European to set foot in present-day Monmouth County? Monmouth County is forested primarily with oak, hickory and shortleaf pine. 1. Where is the oldest lighthouse still in operation in the U.S.? By Mrs. Silence Dogoodlast_img read more