Suspect in 1972 Murder Dies in Apparent Suicide Hours Before Conviction

first_imgA man who eluded homicide investigators in Washington State for nearly 50 years — until a DNA match on a coffee cup cracked the cold case — died in an apparent suicide on Monday just hours before a jury convicted him of murder, the authorities said. The man, Terrence Miller, 78, was charged last year with killing Jody Loomis in 1972 in Snohomish County, which is about 20 miles north of Seattle. – Advertisement – Just before 10 a.m. on Monday, sheriff’s deputies in Edmonds, Wash., responded to a report of a suicide and found what they believed to be Mr. Miller’s body, the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office said. Mr. Miller had been out on bond, and a family member reported the suicide, the sheriff’s office said. About three hours later, in Snohomish County Superior Court, a jury that had been hearing the case against Mr. Miller for two weeks convicted him of the murder of Ms. Loomis. The judge in the case announced in court that Mr. Miller had died, a local radio station reported. A final determination on Mr. Miller’s cause of death won’t be made until at least Tuesday, a spokeswoman for the county medical examiner wrote in an email on Monday night. When two undercover detectives visited a ceramics business that Mr. Miller ran with his wife out of their garage in November 2018, they noticed a nearly seven-month-old newspaper on a table with a headline about an arrest made in another cold case in Snohomish County, the affidavit said. That case involved the double murder of a young couple from British Columbia in 1987, which led to the conviction of William Talbot II.“The presence of the newspaper seemed, at best, an odd coincidence,” the affidavit said. “A fair inference could also be drawn that the defendant was keeping track of the techniques that law enforcement was using to solve cold cases.” Genetic genealogy has been instrumental in identifying more than 40 suspects in languishing cold cases, most notably the so-called Golden State Killer in California. It also led to a double-murder conviction in another high-profile case in the same Pacific Northwest county where Ms. Loomis was killed. – Advertisement – Ms. Loomis, 20, had been riding her bike to visit her horse at a nearby stable when she was sexually assaulted and then shot in the head with a .22-caliber gun, according to a probable cause affidavit.Investigators used genetic genealogy, a process that involved crosschecking DNA evidence — taken from a hiking boot worn by Ms. Loomis — with ancestry records to connect Mr. Miller to the unsolved murder. They did not know each other, the authorities said. center_img – Advertisement – – Advertisement – Terrance Miller in a photograph believed to have been taken around the time Ms. Loomis was murdered.Credit…Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office For decades, the killing of Ms. Loomis had stumped investigators. A couple who had gone out target shooting discovered her partially nude body off a secluded dirt road near Bothell, Wash, on Aug. 23, 1972. Semen was recovered from Ms. Loomis’s body and from a “waffle stomper” hiking boot that she had been wearing at the time and had borrowed from her sister. In 2008, the samples were sent to the Washington State Patrol Crime Laboratory for DNA testing, but they did not return a match. The breakthrough in the case came in 2018 when investigators, working with Parabon NanoLabs, were able to put together a family tree of possible suspects based on the semen sample found on the heel of the victim’s hiking boot. The company uses DNA to help law enforcement agencies find genetic matches.That’s when investigators began their surveillance of Mr. Miller, whom they followed to a nearby casino and from whom they retrieved a coffee cup that he had thrown in the garbage, the probable cause affidavit said. The DNA sample was an exact match to the semen found on Ms. Loomis’s boot, the affidavit said. He was arrested in April 2019 and charged with first-degree murder.Both of Ms. Loomis’s parents are deceased, and her sister could not be immediately reached for comment on Monday night. Laura Martin, the public defender for Mr. Miller, contested the integrity of the DNA evidence in an email to The New York Times on Monday night.“Death seemed preferable to letting a jury decide a verdict on tainted evidence,” Ms. Martin wrote. “This is a terrible tragedy that began with Jody Loomis’s death and is compounded by an innocent man taking his own life.”last_img read more

Purdue Football

first_imgIt was not a surprise when Purdue fired head football coach, Darrell Hazell.  It was a surprise when they fired him in the middle of the season.  Gerard Parker will finish the year as the interim coach.  I sure hope Purdue does not name him the head coach at the end of the season.  This would only prolong the ineptness of the Purdue program.Purdue needs to go out and find a name coach to get the program back on track.  Look what happened with Ohio State and Michigan when they went after the big name coaches.  Les Miles from LSU is available, and I hope Purdue will be willing to pay the money that it will take to get someone of his name recognition to head the program.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast – August 2, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Dry weather continues Friday through most of Tuesday. Temps climbing gradually through the period, leading to above normal temps this weekend and Monday.  Tuesday late afternoon and evening, a few scattered showers and thunderstorms can’t be ruled out over far NW parts of Ohio. However, this action likely is not a big part of our Tuesday outlook. The best chances come near the Michigan line. Nothing happens south of I-70.  Wednesday features scattered showers and those will continue through most of Thursday, although for that day the focal point comes farther south. 48 hour rain totals will range from a few hundredths to nearly an inch, over 80% of the state. The upper half of the range will be kept mostly to central and southern Ohio. Northern areas could be a few tenths or less, and see the moisture done by Wednesday night.  Dry Friday through Sunday (Thursday through Sunday from US 30 northward). Mixed clouds and sun to Thursday and Friday, mostly sunny skies for next weekend.  The extended period has scattered showers from Sunday night through Monday. However, rain totals are limited to a few hundredths to .3” and coverage only at 40%. More of the state misses this action than gets it.  The remainder of the extended period is drier. We are dry from Tuesday the 13th through the end of the week, Saturday the 17th. During that period, though, warm air and rising humidity will prompt chances for a few pop up showers off an on, particularly Tuesday-Thursday. Coverage will be limited to 20%. We are removing threats of heavier action late in the extended period.  10 day rain totals are below. Notice that for the entire 10 day period we have combined moisture of 0” to 1” and a large part of Ohio sees just a few tenths. Those totals are well below normal, except the totals closer to an inch. Keep in mind those higher totals are dependent on better thunderstorm coverage, which could go away.last_img read more

A Practical Guide to Working with Light Stands on Set

first_imgLight stands are priceless assets on any set. With the right stand for the job, you can create a safe and effective working environment.Cover image via Shutterstock.Different projects call for different light stands. The team at Grip Tips has created a series all about the standard light stands you’ll see on most any independent film set. Let’s take a look at how to effectively use each type.Standard Light StandsMost of us are familiar with these standard aluminum light stands that come with most kits. While they usually get the job done, they can easily break or deteriorate over time. It’s always a great idea to upgrade standard stands for something more robust. A poorly built light stand that you can’t raise to its full height can slow down the workflow on set. By investing in high-quality equipment, you can avoid this headache in the future.Preemie StandsA preemie baby stand is a sturdy replacement for your standard light stand. These stands weigh around 5lbs and can typically rise up to six feet and support up to 25lbs. In situations wherein your standard light stands may fail, the preemie stand will excel. If you take good care of them, these stands can last most of your career.Low Boy StandsYour low boy stands are the perfect solution when you need to mount a light a little bit lower — they’re also commonly used with a slider, like a Dana Dolly or a rhino slider. These stands can hold over 70lbs. and are more rigid than a preemie stand.Beefy Baby StandsBeefy baby stands are your next step up in the world of light stands. Although heavy and harder to transport, these stands feature a much higher build quality than a preemie stand or a standard light stand. As replacements for your standard light stand, these offer far more features. Beefy baby stands feature a steel/aluminum construction, and they typically support up to 22lbs, raise up to 12 feet, and feature a ⅝” baby pin (hence the term “baby stand”). These beefy baby stands will accommodate most lights up to a 2K fresnel and smaller HMIs like a Joker 800. Most importantly, they will endure the toughest working conditions.Combo StandsCombo, or junior stands, are the robust bigger brothers of the baby stands. These stands feature a much higher weight capacity — up to 70lbs. Combo/junior stands accommodate larger light fixtures, like a M18 or an ARRI Skypanel. They also are capable of many other duties beyond holding lights. Unlike baby stands, these stands feature a junior pin receiver to help support the added weight from the larger lights.C-StandsC-Stands actually warrant their own blog post. They are the most versatile of any stand on set. They can hold a light, support a bounce board, or organize clothing in wardrobe. If you don’t already own a C-stand, I would thoroughly recommend picking one up and getting used to its functionality, as you will see this stand on all professional sets.Understanding the correct stands to use on a film set can save time and create safer working conditions for everyone. Knowing the difference between all the different stands will also help you to select the right tool on set.last_img read more