Taylor fails twice but Thunder are on top

first_imgHOBART, Tasmania (CMC):West Indies captain Stafanie Taylor suffered a rare double failure with the bat, but her Sydney Thunder did enough to win twice in the inaugural Women’s Big Bash League here yesterday.In the first game of a doubleheader at the Kingston Twin Ovals, Thunder beat Brisbane Heat by five wickets in the first game and returned to defeat Hobart Hurricanes by eight runs in a night encounter.Both Thunder and Hurricanes sit top of the standings on 14 points with identical 7-2 records, but Thunder hold the edge courtesy of net run rate. Chasing an uncomplicated 95 for victory against Heat, Taylor was dismissed for a first-ball ‘duck’ as the visitors stumbled to 20 for three in the fifth over.However, Naomi Stalenburg stroked 42 and captain Alex Blackwell an unbeaten 32 in a 60-run fourth-wicket partnership which rescued the innings.Heat had earlier fallen for 94 all out off their 20 overs, with 19-year-old left-arm spinner Maisy Gibson taking three for 14.Taylor claimed one wicket for six runs from two overs of off-spin.In the second game at Bellerive Oval, Taylor managed just eight as Thunder reached 135 for seven off their 20 overs after opting to bat first.Stalenburg was again among the runs with a cavalier 37 off 16 deliveries, including five fours and two sixes.In reply, Hurricanes were restricted to 127 for eight off their 20 overs, with Taylor’s West Indies teammate Hayley Matthews scoring 11.Captain Heather Knight top-scored with 26.Taylor produced a crucial spell, picking up two for 27 from four overs, to help cripple the Hurricanes run chase.last_img read more

Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma bids farewell to African Union

first_imgNkosazana Dlamini-Zuma’s term as the head of the African Union has drawn to a close. No stranger to politics, she held the position for two terms. We look at her career highlights.Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma is the first woman to head the African Union. Her term runs until the end of January 2017. (Image: African Union, Twitter)Brand South Africa reporterShe’s been a freedom fighter, a politician, a diplomat, a doctor and now her latest role as head of the African Union (AU) – the first woman to hold the position – has come to an end. As Chad’s Moussa Faki Mahamat takes the reins at the pan-African organisation, we look back at Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma’s career.On its website, the AU describes Dlamini-Zuma as “a lady of noble character; a visionary leader, with an incredible passion for the African continent, its developmental ambitions, and is a champion of the renewal of Africa”.She had shown depth and understanding about issues dealing with the African continent and had a great grasp of the dynamics of the AU, the organisation said.The strength of Africa lies in its unity and its Pan-Africanism.— Dr Dlamini Zuma (@DlaminiZuma) January 31, 2017Watch:Her early lifeDlamini-Zuma was born during apartheid, on 27 January 1949, in KwaZulu-Natal. But that did not hinder her academic ambitions. She went to the University of Zululand where she read zoology and botany. She graduated with a BSc degree and moved to the University of Natal to begin her medical degree. At the same time, she became involved in South Africa’s liberation struggle.In 1976, she became deputy president of the South African Students Organisation and went into exile. She still completed her medical degree, but at the University of Bristol in the UK.Dlamini-Zuma: the politicianAfter the first democratic elections in 1994, Dlamini-Zuma became South Africa’s minister of health in Nelson Mandela’s government.In that role, she:Successfully transformed a health system that was racially divided;Introduced anti-smoking legislation making public spaces and some private spaces such as schools, clinics, airports, hotels and offices largely smoke-free;Negotiated with pharmaceutical companies to provide generic, and often cheaper, medication to South Africa. “The successful settlement of the matter was hailed as a victory not only for South Africa, but also the poor around the world, particularly in the developing world,” reads her profile on the AU website, and;Initiated a pilot programme in which medical students and graduates participated in community service, often working in impoverished areas.From 1999 to 2009, Dlamini-Zuma was the minister of foreign affairs, during which time she actively worked towards peace, development and stability on the continent.In 2012, she was elected the chairperson of the AU, becoming the first women to hold the position.In a list http://www.trtworld.com/business/2016s-most-powerful-women-142718 of 2016’s most powerful women published by Turkey’s national public broadcaster, Dlamini-Zuma was number six.It was a list “not based on financial status, but rather skills, creativity and influence making a significant impact in various fields”, the article clarified.AU legacyWhen the AU marked its 50th anniversary in 2013, “Agenda 2063: The Africa We Want” was unveiled. Dlamini-Zuma was integral to its development.Agenda 2063 is the AU’s vision to build an integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa, and is viewed as a new phase in efforts by Africans to catalyse development of the continent and strengthen African integration and unity.“It is her biggest deliverable,” said the outgoing EU representative, ambassador Gary Quince. “For the first time, the AU has a blueprint and a vision.”I have no doubt that the in-coming Commission will continue to strengthen & build upon these foundations, just like the foundations we met.— Dr Dlamini Zuma (@DlaminiZuma) January 31, 2017She also focused on gender empowerment within the organisation, and for women in general.“For me and my fellow commissioners, wherever I shall be and in whatever capacity, I shall forever remain soldiers of the African cause,” she tweeted at the end of January.The new leadership of the AU comprises:Elected Leadership of the @_African Union Commission #28thAUSummit pic.twitter.com/nLOkNeQkmQ— African Union (@_AfricanUnion) February 1, 2017Source: African UnionWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Turning students into entrepreneurs

first_img7 October 2013Deputy Trade and Industry Minister Elizabeth Thabethe on Friday launched a new Centre for Entrepreneurship at the King Hintsa FET College for Agriculture in Butterworth, Eastern Cape.The centre forms part of the Department of Trade and Industry’s (DTI’s) programme to establish platforms at FET colleges around the country to develop local entrepreneurs capable of going on to establish viable, competitive businesses.“Attempts have been made in recent years to provide entrepreneurship development support in a more coherent and comprehensive way,” Thabethe said at Friday’s launch.“It is particularly in the light of the catalyst role it plays that the centre can develop local communities,” Thabethe said, adding that the centre would serve as a hub for information and training in the area.Seed funding of R3-million was allocated for setting up the first phase of the centre, and the DTI would be partnering with the University of Johannesburg to provide capacity building training for lecturers.“Once all systems have been set up, we will move into the second phase, which will involve training,” Thabethe said. “We are going to be linking with an incubation programme to support potential entrepreneurs, and we will also link them with the Small Enterprise Development Agency for training.”Director Jomo Jacobs said the centre will be a valuable addition to the King Hintsa FET College for Agriculture’s strong agro-processing curriculum.“The practical studies that we will be offering will go a long way in addressing the skills shortage and lack of work experience that sees most of our unemployed and graduates struggle to secure jobs,” Jacobs said. “We pledge to grow this centre into a pioneer institution in agro-processing studies.’Thabethe said that, in order to foster entrepreneurship among students, it was crucial to promote business formation as a realistic and profitable option.“It is against this backdrop that efforts are being made to address entrepreneurship development and ensure that education is driven in such a way that business ventures become a choice rather than a last resort for students.”Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Young spenders: Blatant consumerism becomes new religion for adolescents

first_imgBhumika WattsSell them their dreams. People, especially kids, don’t buy things to have things. They buy hope. Sell them this hope and you won’t have to worry about your sales.” This celebratory song of a society high on materialism addressed to a conference of salesmen sums up the reality of,Bhumika WattsSell them their dreams. People, especially kids, don’t buy things to have things. They buy hope. Sell them this hope and you won’t have to worry about your sales.” This celebratory song of a society high on materialism addressed to a conference of salesmen sums up the reality of contemporary urban life.It turns adolescents into a significant consumer segment, not parent-dependant but individuals with an increasing urge to flaunt everything from mobile phones to designer clothes.Brand-consciousness, a fast growing trend among children, has its roots in this urge to belong, or in behavioural scientist Erich Fromm’s words “to stay close to the herd”. Arnish Uberoi, a 13-year-old student of Chennai’s Padma Seshadri Bal Bhawan, has no doubts about the importance of branded goods in his life.”I will remain popular and accepted if I wear popular brands,” he says. NEW DELHI Bhumika Watts (9)HANKERS AFTER: jeans and T-shirts, perfumes and shoes with flat heels. “My friend got her Walkman in a day, get me one this evening.”In an interview to a city tabloid, Vani Aggarwal, 13, remarked that she liked wearing only Guess and Versace clothes.She is not an isolated example; it is a recurrent message that strobes through Indian urban society. Children are defining themselves by what they possess. “I buy, therefore I am” has become the mantra for today’s teens.”Possessions” to them mean branded products that spell status and popularity. Gone are the days of cheap canvas shoes and frilly frocks sewn by mothers at home. Girls now want Mango T-shirts and designer-label jeans.advertisementBoys who were earlier brought up to take pride in ink-stained shirts and scuffed shoes now worry about what gel works best with their hair and what model of cell phones they sport.Their list of “must-haves” reads like a catalogue of a sophisticated mall: trendy clothes, watches, cosmetics, accessories, shoes, mobile phones, CDs, music systems, smart PCs, sports gear, hair dryers and umpteen other gizmos- all the fancy paraphernalia of the “with-it” lifestyle. The latest “necessity” is add-on credit cards over and above the fat weekly allowance for trips to hangout joints or to beauty salons.Arnish UberoiThe burgeoning purchasing power of these brand brats has given the market its little kings and queens. Even in times of economic gloom, the last thing parents compromise on is spending on their children. Estimates put the market for children’s products at Rs 5,000 crore.The confectionery market alone is estimated at Rs 1,400 crore and the apparel market at Rs 500 crore. While children’s footwear is a Rs 1,000 crore market, personal-care products are pegged at Rs 300 crore.”Children mostly come looking for nail polish, shine-control lotions and sunscreen,” says Saurabh Amte, beauty adviser at the Lakme counter at Delhi’s Shopper’s Stop. “They are so well-informed that even their parents seek their help,” he adds.Shweta Chhabria fits the bill. The 15-year-old student of Mumbai’s St Joseph’s Convent Girls School, recently asked her parents for EverYouth almond and apricot cream. She uses perfume every day and says trendy western clothes and junk jewellery make her happy.CHENNAI Arnish Uberoi (13) HANKERS AFTER: Play Station II, branded clothes, T-shirts and a mobile phone “Buy me PlayStation II, and I will perform better in studies and sports.” Even small children are big on cosmetics. Bhumika Watts, 9, a Delhi girl who still plays with dolls, says she is fond of perfumes. And cosmetics are not just a girlie craze. “I wanted the Aamir Khan cut, so I use Brylcreem and L’Oreal hair gel to keep them spiky,” says Nikhil, a 13-year-old student of Delhi Public School.Footing the bill are over-indulgent parents. There are, of course, some precocious youngsters who use emotional blackmail to get what they want. Arnish and his brother Adish, 15, often make “deals” with their parents for expensive video games, apparel and shoes in return for better performance at school. Arnish’s current demand is PlayStation II, a computer game that costs Rs 18,000.Children, in turn, are driven by peer pressure. Most adolescents fear peer rejection. “I borrow my friends’ designer clothes for the disco, otherwise I feel inferior,” confesses Sushmita Garg, 13, as she slips into borrowed embroidered trousers and a Benetton top at the ladies room at Delhi’s Le Meridien before heading for CJ’s, a discotheque that offers post-noon dance parties.Shweta ChhabriaThe conspicuous consumption race creates a rift between children, some kept in check by parents, others unabashedly materialistic.”There are separate groups in our class based on their spending habits,” says Vaishnavi Tannir, 12, of Delhi’s Vasant Valley School. “There is a nerdy group which doesn’t bother about fashionable brands and there is a popular group which judges others by the brands they wear,” she explains.advertisementWhat confounds adults is the amount of information children have on market trends. Samsika Marketing Consultants MD Jagdeep Kapoor conducted a study covering 1,344 children in the 9-14 age group in nine metros from 1999 to 2002 and identified nine prominent traits. MUMBAIShweta Chhabria (15)HANKERS AFTER: Capri pants, T-shirts, body and hair glitter, skin-care products, junk jewellery, funky shoes. “I will feel deprived if I don’t get the things I want.”In 2002, information, inquisitive- ness and income were added to the previous trait list of informal, intelligent, identity conscious, influential to accommodate the emerging trends.While market wizards are changing their coordinates, parents are a confused lot. Some admit they have encouraged expensive habits, while others say they don’t know where to draw the line.Some women live out their own aspirations through their children. “My mother did not allow cosmetics when I was a child so I am particular that my daughter does not look like a Plain Jane,” says Mumbai-based Pooja Chhabria, Shweta’s mother.She is a homemaker and stresses that the lavishness is not to make up for any lack of attention. But some part of it is just old-fashioned pampering. Says Anil Chhabria, Shweta’s father: “I love the twinkle in her eyes when she receives clothes and cosmetics.”Young Priorities: How many spend on whatClick here to EnlargeGuilt drives busy parents who have little time for their children to fill parenting gap by buying expensive gifts and doling out substantial pocket money. But more critical is the fear of “depriving” the child.”I don’t want my kids to suffer from low self-esteem,” argues Anuradha Uberoi, Chennai-based behavioural consultant and mother of Adish and Arnish. “Knowing how much poor self-esteem can damage a child has changed my outlook,” she explains.Family relationships are a casualty in this wave of consumerism. Cold wars erupt when parents oppose children’s demands. “Children use parental guilt to get their fancies fulfilled,” says psychiatrist Sanjay Chugh, who runs a counselling centre in Delhi. “Drifting away from family is a feature of adolescence, and teenagers seek role models among peers instead of parents,” he explains. TRENDS AND FADS An NFO-Coke teen survey identified broad types among adolescents:Vibrant Vanguards: The trendsetters- comfortable with their self-image and the most privileged with lots of pocket money and influence at home.Conspicuous Confidents: Early adapters need visible symbols of status and success to be ahead of others.Eager Beavers: The followers do their best to keep up with the trends set by leaders.Individualistic Idealists: The brand loyalists stay with the established choice and don’t care what’s in fashion.Plain Passives: Out of the mainstream, the underconfident Passives are yet to become serious consumers.Many parents are worried that consumerism may trap their children into a self-centred way of life. However, Susan Visvanathan, sociologist at Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University, argues that consumerism is part of the grammar of a globalised capitalist society.advertisement”Children who coerce parents into buying more goodies are only victims of a system,” she says. “The system does not believe in martyrs, only in survivors. Survival seems to mean an ability to enjoy without looking at the condition of the majority,” she ruminates. Role models have also changed. Mahatma Gandhi, Jesus Christ or Mother Teresa are no longer personalities children idolise. In TV programmes, films and advertisements, the icons are glitzy pop artists and movie stars. Youngsters tend to take the materialism expounded in ads as gospel. Advertisers target children as surrogates to advertise “adult” goods like cars and even credit cards. LG Electronics, for example, uses children in its ads for TVs and refrigerators. Companies know they can win the approval of parents for their brands by promotions in schools. In an interview to KidsCyclopaedia, a Net magazine, Reebok’s Executive Director (Sales and Marketing) Subhinder Singh Prem says their “Net Practice with Rahul Dravid” last year-on buying Reebok goods worth Rs 1,500 or more, there was a chance of joining a cricket camp with cricketer Dravid- was a hit.”Wooing the kid means wooing the entire family, since children drive the spending decisions,” says Amit Burman, director, Dabur India. A study by market research agency NFO-MBL confirms this. About 17 per cent of children in 7-14 age group decide on family purchases. Restaurant chains like Pizza Hut and McDonald’s have been quick to catch up. They offer birthday-party packages complete with return gifts, and decorations to make sure that the restaurants register in children’s mind as pleasure zones.Dangers of consumerism range from compulsive spending habits to the “disposable” culture. Products that were considered durables-like wristwatches and cameras for chil-dren-now find their way into the trash bin. Right now it is the buoyancy of consumerism that is most obvious. But when the tide ebbs, fulfilling the impossible dreams it has sold to children may not be child’s play.last_img read more