a month agoRangers hero Fernando Ricksen passes away

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Rangers hero Fernando Ricksen passes awayby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Rangers player Fernando Ricksen has died at age 43 after a six-year battle with motor neurone disease, the Ibrox club have confirmed.The Dutch international had been battling the condition since 2013.Ricksen was a fans’ favourite during his six-year spell at Rangers after being signed by Dick Advocaat in 2000.He helped the club win the domestic cup double in 2002, the treble in 2003 and was captain for a trophy double in 2005.Rangers said they were “deeply saddened” to be announcing the news of Ricksen’s passing.”The thoughts of everyone at Rangers is today with his wife Veronika, his daughter Isabella and all his family and friends,” the club added. last_img read more

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL BUYS PAW PATROL LIVE SHOW OWNER VSTAR FOR UNDISCLOSED

first_img Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The Cirque du Soleil Entertainment Group has announced the acquisition of a Minnesota-based company that produces theatrical shows, exhibits, cruise ship activities and outdoor events.The deal announced Thursday is for VStar Entertainment Group and its Florida-based subsidiary, Cirque Dreams.While terms were not disclosed, Cirque du Soleil president Daniel Lamarre told The Canadian Press the transaction is worth “several million dollars.” Advertisement Advertisement The PAW Patrol Live ‘Race to the Rescue’ tour visited 250 cities in 18 countries on four continents last year. (Associated Press)center_img Facebook Advertisement Login/Register With: VStar, which has about 120 employees, is best known for its children and family shows, including “PAW Patrol.”The PAW Patrol Live ‘Race to the Rescue’ tour visited 250 cities in 18 countries on four continents in 2017.last_img read more

FSJ for LNG hosting a Truck Rally ahead of next weekends event

first_imgThe rally will start with a vehicle convoy in cooperation with the Peace Region Truck Enthusiasts. Vehicles will cue behind the LNG or BUST bus at 9:45 a.m. The convoy will flag off at the frontage road near the UFA card lock at 10:00 and convoy along the Alaska Highway. The convoy will break up on the return to Fort St. John and proceed to the main rally area at around 10:45.More information about the rally can be found on the Vehicle Rally Facebook event page. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Officials with local grassroots organization Fort St. John for LNG will be hosting a truck rally ahead of next weekend’s rally in the Energetic City supporting the development of a liquified natural gas export industry in B.C.FSJ for LNG founder Alan Yu says that the rally is planned for April 21st, a day over two years since its last rally which saw then-Premier Christy Clark make an appearance. The rally will take place at the corner of 100th St. and 96th Ave., in the parking lot of the old Visitor Information Centre. Vivian Krause is set to deliver a keynote address at this year’s rally. Krause is a controversial Vancouver-based blogger and researcher who has received both praise and condemnation for her research into environmental charities in Canada, particularly their source of funding. In addition to hosting her Fair Questions blog, Krause also writes for The Financial Post.last_img read more

More talk than action on increasing caribou protection federal report

first_img“Additional efforts, including those noted in this report, are needed to reverse the loss of critical habitat and declines in boreal caribou populations.”The department is required under the Species At Risk Act to assess provincial and territorial efforts to assist the recovery of caribou populations.In April, Environment Canada found significant problems. In every province, agencies that issue permits for forestry or energy development aren’t required to conform to the federal Species At Risk Act.That earlier report also noted that little conservation is taking place on the ground. Measures in almost every case are still being planned or drafted.That situation continues. The new report lists dozens of ongoing negotiations, draft plans and provincial promises to restore caribou populations to sustainable levels, but there are few fully implemented protected areas.Planning is good, said Florence Daviet of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. Action would be better. OTTAWA, O.N. – An Environment Canada report says that despite much talk on preserving caribou habitat, little progress has been made to close gaps in the protection of the threatened species.The agency says not much has changed since a coast-to-coast survey in April.“Despite the progress being made, the gaps in protection, as described in the first progress report, remain,” says the report issued Friday. “They were supposed to be doing this planning and talking since 2012,” she said. “They’ve had a lot of time to talk.”Barry Robinson, a lawyer with the group Ecojustice, pointed out that Friday’s report was itself almost two months overdue. So are many of the protection measures that should be in place by now, he said.“We still don’t have any range plans in Alberta, which were to have been done by October 2017.”Many governments, including Alberta, have announced ambitious plans for new protected areas. But almost all remain in draft form or remain unimplemented, he said.center_img “The big gaps are still there.”Caroline Theriault, an Environment Canada spokeswoman, said the report shows many steps have been taken across the country to support caribou recovery.“Since the last report was published in April, provinces and territories have made some progress on protection plans and on the ground recovery efforts,” she said in an emailed statement. “We recognize that more needs to be done, and we are already taking action.”The latest assessment of woodland caribou suggest that 81 percent of Canada’s herds are in decline. Loss of another one-third of the population is expected “in the near term.”The main threat to their numbers is alteration of habitat, which reduces a herd’s productivity and allows access by predators.Caribou conservation is often seen to be in direct conflict with forestry and energy and the jobs they generate. In late March, Alberta delayed its own caribou range plans over economic concerns.Robinson said that sooner or later, legislation will oblige federal Environment Minister Catherine McKenna to step in and override provincial regulations with an emergency protection order.“The minister has not done the one thing she is legally required to do, which is to recommend a protection order when the province hasn’t protected the required habitat.”(THE CANADIAN PRESS)last_img read more

Beaverlodge RCMP are looking for a man who may have been headed

first_imgThe care Jeremy was last seen driving – RCMP UPDATE – The RCMP advise that Jeremy Ray has been found.BEAVERLODGE, A.B. – RCMP are seeking the public’s assistance to locate 37-year-old Jeremy Ray. Jeremy was last seen on July 29, 2019, and maybe headed to Fort St. John.Jeremy may be travelling in his 2007 black Honda Civic, AB plate: FUD 818.Jeremy is described as:Caucasian male6′, 220 lbs.Brown hair, blue eyesThere is a general concern for his wellbeing. If you have any information on the whereabouts of Jeremy Ray, please contact the Beaverlodge RCMP at 780-354-2485, or call your local police.If you wish to remain anonymous, you can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS), online at www.P3Tips.com or by using the “P3 Tips” app available through the Apple App or Google Play Store.last_img read more

Bodies of 5, missing since Feb 28, fished out from Guj canal

first_imgSurat: Over a fortnight after they went missing, bodies of five members of a family in Gujarat’s Surat were Sunday fished out from a local canal, police said. The bodies of Jeevan Gamit (65), his wife Sharmila (62), son Dharmesh (41), daughter-in-law Sunita (36) and granddaughter Urvi (6) were brought out from a canal near Madhi village in the district, said Bardoli police station Inspector B K Patel said. “The five are residents of Kapura village in Vyara tehsil in neighbouring Tapi district. Their family members had filed a missing person complaint at the local police station there on February 28,” Patel said. “Their car apparently fell into the canal near Madhi village. The Maruti Eeco car they were travelling in was spotted in the canal by residents on Sunday who then informed us. We brought out the car and the bodies of the five were found inside in a highly decomposed state,” he informed. Relatives of the deceased have told police they had gone to Bardoli to offer prayers at a temple and were on their way back when they met with an accident, Patel said. “It seems the driver lost control of the car and it plunged into the canal. Further probe into the incident is underway,” he added.last_img read more

Kakoli’s road show garners stellar response in Barasat

first_imgKolkata: Kakoli Ghosh Dastidar, the outgoing Trinamool Congress MP from Barasat who is contesting the elections from the same seat for the third time, took out a massive road show in Barasat on Sunday morning in a bid to woo the voters.The road show, which was started from the Lokenath Temple on Barasat-Barrackpore Road, saw a huge surge of people as it went past various important places under her constituency. As the road show advanced, hundreds of Trinamool Congress supporters joined the rally, thereby contributing to the length of it. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaMany youths and girls clad in colourful dresses were seen marching down the lanes and by-lanes of Barasat. A dance troupe also participated in the campaign. People congregated in large numbers on both sides of the road to catch a glimpse of Ghosh and the beautifully decorated tableaus that took part in the election rally. Ghosh was seen making her vote appeal to the people gathered on the road and also to those found standing on the balconies of their houses situated on the road. Ghosh waved her hands at the voters who readily reciprocated the gesture. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayGetting swayed by the response of the people, Ghosh later got down from the jeep and joined the dance group before the road show finally ended near Moyna area on Krishnanagar Road. In response to media questions, Ghosh said that Trinamool Congress candidates nominated by her party Supremo and Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee will win in all the 42 Lok Sabha seats in the state. “Mamata Banerjee is a great source of inspiration for me. She is doing very hard work while moving from place to place, setting examples for all of us. We should also toil hard taking lessons from her. Bengal has seen an unprecedented surge in development works ever since Banerjee became the Chief Minister,” Ghosh said. “All the 42 TMC candidates who are in the fray having the blessings of Mamata Banerjee, will come out victorious. We are getting tremendous response from the people who are extending their support to carry out the development works in the state,” Ghosh maintained. Reacting sharply to the comment of Special Observer Ajay V Nayak, she said: “It was a dark age for Bengal when the Left Front government used to rule the state. After becoming the Chief Minister, Banerjee restored the rule of law. Law and order situation is properly maintained here now and hence women can safely move from one place to another, even during late night.”last_img read more

You Cant Opt Out Of Sharing Your Data Even If You Didnt

The Golden State Killer, who terrorized Californians from Sacramento to Orange County over the course of a decade, committed his last known murder in 1986, the same year that DNA profiling was used in a criminal investigation for the first time. In that early case, officers convinced thousands of men to voluntarily turn over blood samples, building a genetic dragnet to search for a killer in their midst. The murderer was eventually identified by his attempts to avoid giving up his DNA. In contrast, suspected Golden State Killer Joseph James DeAngelo, who was apprehended just last week, was found through other people’s DNA — samples taken from the crime scenes were matched to the profiles his distant relatives had uploaded to a publicly accessible genealogy website.You can see the rise of a modern privacy conundrum in the 32 years between the first DNA case and DeAngelo’s arrest. Digital privacy experts say that the way DeAngelo was found has implications reaching far beyond genetics, and the risks of exposure apply to everyone — not just alleged serial killers. We’re used to thinking about privacy breaches as what happens when we give data about ourselves to a third party, and that data is then stolen from or abused by that third party. It’s bad, sure. But we could have prevented it if we’d only made better choices.Increasingly, though, individuals need to worry about another kind of privacy violation. I think of it as a modern tweak on the tragedy of the commons — call it “privacy of the commons.” It’s what happens when one person’s voluntary disclosure of personal information exposes the personal information of others who had no say in the matter. Your choices didn’t cause the breach. Your choices can’t prevent it, either. Welcome to a world where you can’t opt out of sharing, even if you didn’t opt in.Yonatan Zunger, a former Google privacy engineer, noted we’ve known for a long time that one person’s personal information is never just their own to share. It’s the idea behind the old proverb, “Three may keep a secret if two of them are dead.” And as far back as the 1960s, said Jennifer Lynch, senior staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, phone companies could help law enforcement collect a list of all the numbers one phone line called and how long the calls lasted. The phone records may help convict a guilty party, but they also likely call police attention to the phone numbers, identities and habits of people who may not have anything to do with the crime being investigated.But the digital economy has changed things, making the privacy of the commons easier to exploit and creating stronger incentives to do so.“One of the fascinating things we’ve now walked ourselves into is that companies are valued by the market on the basis of how much user data they have,” said Daniel Kahn Gillmor, senior staff technologist with the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project. A company can run along, not making a cent, but if it has a large user base and reams of private information about those users, then it’s valuable — and can be sold for millions. Companies that collect more data, keep that data, and use it to make connections between users are worth more. Sears, Roebuck and Co. may have been able to infer when you bought a gift from their catalog for a friend who lived in another town, but Amazon has more reason (and more ability) to use that information to build a profile of your friend’s interests.We all saw this in action in the recent Cambridge Analytica scandal. The privacy of the commons is how the 270,000 Facebook users who actually downloaded the “thisisyourdigitallife” app turned into as many as 87 million users whose data ended up in the hands of a political marketing firm. Much of the narrative surrounding that scandal has focused on what individuals should be doing to protect themselves. But that idea that privacy is all about your individual decisions is part of the problem, said Julie Cohen, a technology and law professor at Georgetown University. “There’s a lot of burden being put on individuals to have an understanding and mastery of something that’s so complex that it would be impossible for them to do what they need to do,” she said.Even if you do your searches from a specialized browser, tape over all your webcams and monitor your privacy settings without fail, your personal data has probably still been collected, stored and used in ways you didn’t intend — and don’t even know about.Companies can even build a profile of a person from birth based entirely on data-sharing choices made by others, said Salome Viljoen, a lawyer and fellow with the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard. Imagine new parents signing up for a loyalty card at their local pharmacy and then filling all of their child’s prescriptions there. The information collected every time they scan that loyalty card adds up to something like a medical history, which could later be sold to data brokers or combined with data bought from brokers to paint a fuller picture of a person who never consented to any of this.So does that mean that, in addition to locking down our own privacy choices, we need to police the choices of our friends and family? No, said Cohen, Gillmor and Viljoen. In fact, the privacy of the commons means that, in some cases, your data is collected in ways you cannot reasonably prevent, no matter how carefully you or anyone you know behaves.Take, for instance, Equifax, the credit-rating company that lost control of the data of 143 million people last year. Those people weren’t necessarily members of Equifax. Instead, the company collected data from other companies the people chose to do business with, and much of that business was stuff people can’t get by without, like renting or owning a home. Or, alternately, consider Facebook, again. That company has admitted it tracks the online behavior of people who never intentionally engage with it at all, thanks to partnerships with other websites. (Like many sites, FiveThirtyEight has this kind of partnership with Facebook. Our pages talk to the social network in several ways, including through ads and comments, and because of the embedded “Like” button.) If hounding every person you’ve ever cared about into adopting encryption tools like PGP sounded like fun, you’ll love living in a van down by the river with no internet access.1And I hope you’re prepared to buy the van with cash, because if you need credit, the credit check the dealer runs could hand your information to Equifax again.Instead, experts say these examples show that we need to think about online privacy less as a personal issue and more as a systemic one. Our digital commons is set up to encourage companies and governments to violate your privacy. If you live in a swamp and an alligator attacks you, do you blame yourself for being a slow swimmer? Or do you blame the swamp for forcing you to hang out with alligators?There isn’t yet a clear answer for what the U.S. should do. Almost all of our privacy law and policy is framed around the idea of privacy as a personal choice, Cohen said. The result: very little regulation addressing what data can be collected, how it should be protected, or what can be done with it. In some ways, Gillmor said, online privacy is where the environmental movement was back in the 1950s, when lots of big, centralized choices were hurting individuals’ health, and individuals had little power to change that. “I don’t even know if we have had our ‘Silent Spring’ yet,” he said. “Maybe Cambridge Analytica will be our ‘Silent Spring.’” read more

Mens hockey Mason Jobst named firstteam four other Buckeyes receive B1G honors

OSU sophomore forward Mason Jobst (26) tries to get past Michigan State redshirt freshman defender Jerad Rosburg (57) in a game on March 3 at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus, Ohio. Credit: Kevin Stankiewicz | Lantern photographerFive members of the 13th-ranked Ohio State men’s hockey team received Big Ten honors on Monday.Sophomore forward Mason Jobst was named to the All-Big Ten first team and recognized as the conference’s scoring co-champion with Minnesota sophomore forward Tyler Sheehy, racking up 34 points in conference play. Sheehy won Big Ten Player of the Year.Jobst had 13 goals and 21 assists in league play, and collected 51 points on 18 goals and 33 assists in the regular season.A trio of seniors were named to the All-Big Ten second team — goaltender Christian Frey, defenseman Josh Healey and forward captain Nick Schilkey.Sophomore forward Dakota Joshua was an honorable mention selection, scoring a career-high 11 goals and 22 assists, including nine goals and 11 assists coming in Big Ten play.On Saturday at Wisconsin, Jobst scored a goal and had an assist to surpass the 50-point barrier for the first time since R.J. Umberger had 53 points in 2003.Jobst ranks ninth in the NCAA in points per game (1.42), but leads the nation in the category since the start of the second half of the year (1.67).Following first-team honors in 2016, Healey earned his way onto the second-team all-conference with 24 points on four goals and 20 assists. His plus-18 rating is third among blue-liners in the conference and ranks eighth nationally at his position.Schilkey was the do-it-all player for the Buckeyes in the regular season. The senior from Marysville, Michigan, led the Big Ten with 26 goals and ranks second in the NCAA with .81 goals per game. The 26 goals are the highest single-season total for one player in the program since 1997. He had 39 points in the regular season, 18 of which came against Big Ten opponents.Frey ended the season with a .916 save percentage in conference games and a .910 save percentage in the regular season. Frey was injured for part of the season, and shared playing time with fellow senior goaltender Matt Tomkins. Frey was 9-7-3 with one shutout this season.Senior goaltender Logan Davis received one of six Big Ten sportsmanship awards.OSU plays in the Big Ten quarterfinals against Michigan State in Detroit at Joe Louis Arena on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. read more

Semifinals are ready for the 2019 AFC Asian Cup

first_imgFour teams will battle to get two tickets to the tournament final, as they want to show they are the best nation in the confederation.After eight teams battled it out in the Quarterfinals, the 2019 AFC Asian Cup Semifinals are ready to be played now.Iran won the right to attend the Semifinal when they defeated China 3-0 on January 24.Meanwhile, Japan was able to beat surprising Vietnam the same day.On January 25, South Korea lost 1-0 against Qatar, while hosts the United Arab Emirates (UAE) defeated current champions Australia.The stage is set now for the Semifinals, which will start playing on January 28th at Hazza Bin Zayed Stadium when Iran takes on Japan.ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES - FEBRUARY 01: Abdelkarim Hassan of Qatar celebrates with a teammate following their sides victory during the AFC Asian Cup final match between Japan and Qatar at Zayed Sports City Stadium on February 1, 2019 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)Qatar will plan soon how to aim higher Manuel R. Medina – February 3, 2019 The Qatari national team won the AFC Asian Cup for the first time ever, but the 2022 FIFA World Cup hosts don’t want it to end there.Iran trashed Yemen 5-0 in Group D and then defeated Vietnam 2-0, only to draw against Iraq 0-0. The Persians then beat Oman 2-0 and China 3-0. They are the only team left who hasn’t allowed any goals against.Meanwhile, Japan has won all its five matches, beating Turkmenistan 3-2, Oman 1-0, and Uzbekistan 2-1. The Samurai Blue then defeated Saudi Arabia 1-0 and Vietnam 1-0 in the elimination rounds.The other Semifinal will be played between Qatar and the hosts UAE on January 29th at Mohammed Bin Zayed Stadium.Qatar is the only other country which has won all its matches so far in the tournament. The 2022 FIFA World Cup hosts defeated Lebanon 2-0, trashed North Korea 6-0 and then beat Saudi Arabia 2-0. The Qatari then won 1-0 against Iraq and 1-0 against South Korea to be in the Semifinals.And of all four nations qualified to this stage, the United Arab Emirates have had the worst time at the tournament. The UAE drew 1-1 against Bahrain, then defeated India 2-0, only to draw again against Thailand. In the Round of 16, the locals had to go to overtime to beat Kyrgyzstan 3-2 but then defeated current champions Australia 1-0 in the Quarterfinals.The Final will be played on February 1st, at Zayed Sports City in Abu Dhabi, where the AFC will meet its new champion after Australia was defeated in the Quarterfinals.last_img read more