Central Arkansas Set to Host 2019 Cross Country Championships Friday

first_imgFRISCO, Texas – The 2019 Southland Conference Cross Country Championships are set to begin Friday, Nov. 1 at Beaverfork Lake Park in Conway, Ark. Central Arkansas will serve as the host institution for the women’s 6k event at 8:15 a.m. CT, followed by the men’s 8k race at 9:15 a.m.Stephen F. Austin enters the women’s meet as the frontrunner, currently ranked sixth in the latest South Central Regional poll. The Ladyjacks took third-place honors at the 2018 conference meet but will look to ride the momentum of their four regular-season races this season.Abilene Christian jumped two spots to occupy the ninth-place position in the latest women’s regional poll. Junior Briahna Gerlach has led the ACU women in all four of their regular-season meets, capturing three top-20 performances and one individual race title along the way.The Texas A&M-Corpus Christi women’s squad looks to defend its 2018 championship as it enters the race ranked 12th in the South Central region. The Islanders will look to Valentina Campos for race experience as the junior led the team in the final regular-season race with a 10th-place individual finish at the Arturo Barrios Invitational (Oct. 19). A&M-Corpus Christi has logged top-five team finishes in three of its four meets throughout the 2019 campaign.McNeese rounds out the women’s regionally ranked squads as the region’s No. 15 team heading the Southland Championship. The Cowgirls have earned a pair of top-five team finishes throughout the season and will look to contend for their third team title in program history.On the men’s side, four teams enter Friday’s festivities with a regionally-ranked status. Lamar leads the way as the South Central’s No. 4 team, while No. 12 Abilene Christian, No. 14 McNeese and No. 15 Texas A&M-Corpus Christi look to challenge for the Southland title. However, the path to the 2019 trophy runs through reigning champion Central Arkansas, who will have the opportunity to repeat on home soil.Lamar will look to Jordan Rowe to set the pace as the senior recorded top-10 finishes in each of his three races this season, including an individual title at the season-opening Rice Invitational (Sept. 13). The Cardinals have captured a five of the last six team and individual championships at the conference meet.Abilene Christian aims for its first Southland title since rejoining the conference in the 2013 season. The Wildcats are primed for a the 8k event after a 16th-place team finish at the Arturo Barrios Invitational, besting four other Southland conference foes. Kevin Kipkosgei led the ACU squad with an 18th-place finish in his most recent outing and was named Athlete of the Week for his troubles.The Cowboys tied a bow on the 2019 regular season, earning top-three team finishes in three of their four races. Junior Daniel Saina captured a pair of Southland Athlete of the Week honors after leading the McNeese squad in a trio of appearances.Texas A&M-Corpus Christi jumped into the latest regional polls after concluding the season with an 18th-place showing at the Arturo Barrios Invite. Tristan Stellmach and Isaac Vargas have each led the Islanders in two races and have combined for four top-five individual finishes.For athletes who qualify, the 2019 NCAA South Central Regional qualifying race will take place at the Agri-Park on Friday, Nov. 15 in Fayetteville, Ark., hosted by Arkansas. The 2019 NCAA Cross Country Championships will take place at LaVern Gibson Championship Course in Terre Haute, Ind., Saturday, Nov. 23.last_img read more

Video: Microbe tornadoes create ‘living crystals’

first_imgScientists have discovered the first “living crystal” formed by a microbe—the speedy Thiovulum majus, one of the fastest swimming species of bacteria known. These bacteria live in the muddy bottoms of salt marshes and produce energy by oxidizing sulfide. Researchers discovered that when the bacteria hit the edge of a container, they move along its surface and eventually aggregate into ordered, 2D formations. The microbes generate a tornadolike flow with their spinning flagella, which pull nearby bacteria toward them, causing them to arrange in crystalline clumps, they report in a paper to be published in Physical Review Letters. Whereas most crystals are inert structures, these crystals rearrange and rotate over time, as shown in the video above, thanks to the forces each bacterium exerts on its neighbors. Scientists don’t yet know if these bacteria form such crystals in their natural environment or whether there are potential applications for the result, but, says physicist Alexander Petroff of Rockefeller University in New York City, first author of the study, “it is still a great incentive to play in the mud and do math.”(Video credit: Xiao-Lun Wu)Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more