Man wanted in connection with random stabbing attack in Hillcrest

first_img KUSI Newsroom, April 11, 2018 Posted: April 11, 2018 Man wanted in connection with random stabbing attack in Hillcrest KUSI Newsroom SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Authorities reached out to the public Wednesday for help in identifying a man believed responsible for an apparently random stabbing attack that left a pedestrian severely wounded in Hillcrest last weekend.The suspect, a thin Latino who appeared to be in his mid-20s to mid-30s, was seen walking around in the area of Essex and Richmond streets in San Diego for about a half-hour early Sunday evening, seemingly looking for someone to fight, according to police.He eventually threw a rock at a 51-year-old pedestrian and walked off, but returned short time later and attacked the same victim with a knife, stabbing him in the head and neck, police said. The assailant then fled to the west.Medics took the victim to a trauma center for treatment of severe wounds. The man, who remained hospitalized this morning, is expected to survive.A surveillance camera near the scene of the attack captured images of the suspected attacker.Anyone with information about the case is asked to call San Diego County Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477 or contact the agency online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Tipsters may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Former RDA CEOs Severance Package Set at 500000

first_imgEarlier this week, it was reported that former Reader Digest Association’s CEO Tom Williams was awarded $500,000 in a severance package. Williams was promoted to the position after former CEO and president Mary Berner exited the company in April.Williams, who acted as CFO with RDA from November 2008 until his bump to CEO in 2011, agreed to a severance package of $1.2 million during the RDA financial reorganization that transpired in August 2009. According to reports, Williams will receive less than half of the originally agreed upon sum in his departure from the company. This mirrors Berner’s pay, as RDA reportedly paid Berner $1 million in her April severance package. At the time of the 2009 reorganization, Berner agreed to a severance package of $2.2 million if she wasn’t offered her job back after the company emerged from bankruptcy protection. Stepping into the rotating CEO slot is Robert Guth, who joined the RDA Board of directors in the same month Berner exited the company; he was named Williams’ replacement in recent weeks. Guth is a former CEO of telecommunications company TelCove.RDA saw a rough second quarter, with RDA Holding Corp. reporting a 6.2 percent drop in revenue to $409.4 million in its financial statements. Every Day With Rachael Ray, once considered a performance leader in RDA’s print portfolio, experienced a 16.8 percent ad page drop in first half 2011, according to FOLIO: sister site, minonline. However, sister title Reader’s Digest saw a spike in ad pages from January to June 2011, up 4.4 percent, according to Publishers’ Information Bureau. In July, The Wall Street Journal reported Reader’s Digest was put on the block; asking price is set around $1 billion.last_img read more

Wiredcom Adds Two New Channels

first_img Transportation, which previously lived as a subsection of Wired’s “Gear” channel, will now occupy a tab of its own, headed by associate editor Alex Davies. Prior to joining Wired in 2014, Davies spent two years as a reporter for Business Insider. The new sections join Wired’s existing channels—Business, Design, Gear, Science, and Security—on Wired.com, which received a redesign in March. “The new WIRED Culture section will be home to smart thinking about how society is changing: how we communicate, what we value, how we grow,” the introductory note reads. “Every tomorrow is brighter than the one before it, and that’s bigger than entertainment—that’s culture.” Citing Wired’s coverage of recent innovations like Audi’s self-driving car and Tesla’s electric SUV, Davies explained in an editor’s note, “How we move around on the planet (and beyond it) is fundamentally changing—and as it does, it will change a great deal about who we are, how we interact, and what our lives look like.” Senior editor Peter Rubin—who oversaw the former entertainment tab—will head up the new culture section, while former Yahoo! Movies managing editor Brian Raftery will be a senior writer. The section will publish 40 to 50 stories each month, according to the company. The transportation vertical will publish about 40 pieces per month, at least 40 percent of which will be related to automotive technology. Wired is looking to bring in two additional full-time writers for the new section. center_img The new culture section is a re-branding, of sorts, of the tab formerly known as entertainment. An introductory note describes the shift as reflective of the increasingly-dominant role that the internet and social media play in defining “WIRED culture”—from memes and hashtags to Vines and Periscope streams—extending far beyond movies, music, television, and video games. Wired kicked off 2016 by adding two new sections to its website: Culture and Transportation. Transportation-related content accounted for eight percent of all traffic to Wired.com in 2015, according to the company, up 30 percent from the year prior. Ford Motor Company serves as the transportation section’s launch sponsor.last_img read more

Blue light allows for making carbonnitrogen bonds without energetically unfavorable reactions

first_img Journal information: Science (Phys.org)—A team of researchers at Princeton University and a Bristol-Myers Squibb associate have developed a means for creating reactive ammonium radical cations using flashes of blue light. In their paper published in the journal Science, the team describes their new technique and the ways they believe it could be used to create substituted amines. Travis Buchanan and Kami Hull with the University of Illinois offer a Perspectives piece on the work done by the team and the expected impact the new technique is likely to have on organic chemistry. As Buchanan and Hull note, amines (which are molecules that have a C—N bond) are very important in the pharmaceutical industry—approximately 84 percent of pharmaceuticals contain amines. But, as they also note, conventional processes that are used to create carbon-nitrogen bonds involve what they describe as energetically unfavorable reactions—they are inefficient. The process typically involves hydroamination which is where a N—H bond is directly added to a C—C molecule, or even to a triple. In this new effort, the researchers report on a new method using a simple blue light from an LED that gets the job done in a more efficient way.The team at Princeton used a photochemical approach that allowed for the creation of reactive ammonium radical cations using a flashing blue light (for 12 hours), which in turn was used to form the desired isomers. They used the blue light to excite an iridium complex to oxidize the amine, allowing for efficient bonding with the olefin. A thiophenol cocatalyst was then used to move the electron back. The researchers report that their technique could be uses for a variety of olefin and amine compounds allowing for using amines in pharmaceuticals in new and useful ways—some of which, they report, could not be created any other way. Furthermore, they note, the technique is completely atom economical—all of the atoms in the starting materials wound up in the end product.Buchanan and Hull suggest the new approach could represent a transformative approach to amine synthesis, noting that the researchers used their technique to animate a sample of every existing olefin type. A new method cuts the cost of drug-building chemicals Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img More information: Andrew J. Musacchio et al. Catalytic intermolecular hydroaminations of unactivated olefins with secondary alkyl amines, Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aal3010AbstractThe intermolecular hydroamination of unactivated alkenes with simple dialkyl amines remains an unsolved problem in organic synthesis. We report a catalytic protocol for efficient additions of cyclic and acyclic secondary alkyl amines to a wide range of alkyl olefins with complete anti-Markovnikov regioselectivity. In this process, carbon-nitrogen bond formation proceeds through a key aminium radical cation intermediate that is generated via electron transfer between an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and an amine substrate. These reactions are redox-neutral and completely atom-economical, exhibit broad functional group tolerance, and occur readily at room temperature under visible light irradiation. Certain tertiary amine products generated through this method are formally endergonic relative to their constituent olefin and amine starting materials and thus are not accessible via direct coupling with conventional ground-state catalysts. © 2017 Phys.org Citation: Blue light allows for making carbon-nitrogen bonds without ‘energetically unfavorable’ reactions (2017, February 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-blue-carbon-nitrogen-bonds-energetically-unfavorable.html Proposed catalytic cycle for hydroamination. Credit: (c) Science (2017). DOI: 10.1126/science.aal3010last_img read more