CVPS proposes renewable energy grants, studies

first_imgWith an eye toward traditional renewable projects as well as cutting-edge studies, Central Vermont Public Service has proposed funding a variety of projects to further clean energy development in Vermont. ‘From improvements to existing projects to forward-thinking projects with great potential, we hope to improve and expand Vermont’s renewable energy options,’ CVPS spokesman Steve Costello said.  ‘In proposing funding for these projects, we hope to make new strides in energy production.’ The CVPS proposals, filed with the Vermont Public Service Board, include funding for nine renewable and carbon-reduction projects and studies for a total award of about $340,000.  In a letter to the PSB, CVPS noted the proposals would be funded from an insurance rebate related to the company’s former ownership in Vermont Yankee. CVPS proposed a $30,000 grant to the University of Vermont to fund a study that could improve energy production of manure-based methane, the energy source for CVPS Cow Powerâ ¢.  The study would analyze microbes that produce methane in an effort to improve the cost-effectiveness of farm methane energy systems. ‘The primary goals are to identify the micro-organisms that can produce the highest amount of methane and the optimal conditions for them to grow and produce methane,’ Costello said.  ‘This could improve energy production and the economics of manure-based energy production.’ CVPS proposed a $15,000 grant to help fund the Vermont Deep Geothermal Energy Study, a state effort to examine the potential of deep geothermal energy.  This grant would fund field data acquisition, including a survey of water well temperature data and rock properties, which are cost-effective methods to begin the search for geothermal resources.  A separate $25,000 grant would support Vermont Technical College’s plans to install a ground-source heat pump space heating and cooling system on the Randolph Center campus. Other proposals include:$50,000 for two solar hybrid-electric vehicle charging stations;$30,000 to fund continued research on the use of lake weeds as an energy source in biodigesters;$43,000 to improve the CVPS Renewable Energy Education Center on Route 7 in Rutland Town.  The funds would be used to add web-based and on-site monitoring equipment that would allow viewers to see energy production of the solar and hydro facilities in real time, as well as wind speed from a test tower at the site.  Drainage and walking path improvements would also be made;$15,000 for a Green Mountain College summer learning project to evaluate energy and environmental innovation as it pertains to customer engagement;$15,000 for the production of a GMC white paper on hyper-efficient electric devices, including plug-in vehicles; andA $15,000 grant to the Vermont Environmental Consortium to study the feasibility of a significant new solar project at the Elizabeth Copper Mine in Strafford.  ‘Vermonters already enjoy one of the cleanest power supplies in the nation, with rates that are among the lowest in the Northeast,’ Costello said.  ‘Through these studies and projects, we intend to support continued development of new renewable energy while providing seed funds to investigate promising new technologies.’last_img read more

Guess who’s dead? Rosencrantz and Guildenstern

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisIt’s the Alpena Civic Theatre’s final show of the season: Rosencrantz and Guilderstern are Dead. Opening day is May 10 at 7:30 PM. Can you identify one member of WBKB featured in this classic Shakespeare piece? We can.Facebook | https://www.facebook.com/WBKBTV/ Twitter | https://twitter.com/WBKB11 Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/wbkbtv/AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Expect travel delays near Second Ave. BridgeNext Fairview High School Seniors Return from Helping Families Affected by Hurricane Harveylast_img read more

Photos Russia detains more than 1000 people in opposition crackdown

first_img Law enforcement officers block a street during a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov A woman looks as law enforcement officers block a street during a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov Law enforcement officers detain a participant of a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov A woman talks with a law enforcement officer during a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva Law enforcement officers block a street during a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov A hand of a detained protester is seen inside a police bus after he was detained during a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva Law enforcement officers detain a participant of a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva Law enforcement officers detain a participant of a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov A woman reads the Constitution of Russia to law enforcement officers during a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyevacenter_img Protesters take part at a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Maxim Shemetov Russian police rounded up more than 1,000 people in Moscow on Saturday in one of the biggest crackdowns of recent years against an increasingly defiant opposition decrying President Vladimir Putin’s tight grip on power.The detentions came around a protest to demand that opposition members be allowed to run in a local election. Authorities had declared it illegal and sought to block participation, but thousands of people turned up anyway in one of the longest and most determined protests of recent times.Chants of “Russia without Putin” and “Putin resign” echoed through central Moscow as guardsmen clad in riot gear beat back protesters with batons and roughly detained people.At least one woman and a man appeared to have suffered serious head wounds. Activists said the crackdown was the harshest since a wave of anti-Kremlin protests in 2011-12.Saturday’s events showed how Kremlin critics and especially younger people remain intent on pressing to open Russia’s tightly-choreographed political system to competition.Jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny had called the protest to persuade officials to allow opposition-minded candidates to run in a Sept. 8 vote.Authorities say they were barred because they failed to collect sufficient genuine signatures in their support.Navalny and his allies have no seats in parliament and are starved of air time on state TV where many Russians still get their news.Opinion polls in the past have shown support for Navalny, a lawyer and anti-corruption activist, only in the single digits. But backers note he won almost a third of the vote in a 2013 Moscow mayoral race and say his movement could build momentum in the Russian capital if allowed to compete fairly.Though Putin’s approval rating is still high at well over 60 percent, it is lower than it used to be due to discontent over years of falling incomes. Last year, the 66-year-old former KGB intelligence officer won a landslide re-election and a new six-year term until 2024.Burnishing his man of action image, Putin spent Saturday diving to the bottom of the Gulf of Finland in a mini-submarine to honour a Soviet submarine that sunk there in World War Two.ARRESTED “SITTING ON A BENCH”OVD-Info, an independent monitoring group, said police detained at least 1,373 people before or at Saturday’s protest. As in past sweeps, many were only held for a matter of hours.Police put participation at more than 3,500 people, of whom it said around 700 people were journalists and bloggers. Activists said the number attending was likely to have been much higher.Some activists were arrested twice after being released and then returning to protest in a different place. Reuters witnesses said some of those detained appeared to be ordinary passersby in the wrong place at the wrong time.One of those detained, Alexander Latyshev, 45, said he had came from the nearby Vladimir region to discuss business with an associate and been randomly detained. “I was just sitting on a bench (when they took me),” he told Reuters inside a police bus.Police also raided an office being used by Navalny’s supporters to live-stream the protest.TV Rain, an independent station covering the protests, said its editor-in-chief had been called in for questioning after police visited its offices.Under Russian law, the location and timing of such protests needs to be agreed with authorities beforehand, something that was not done for Saturday’s event.Kremlin critic Navalny was jailed for 30 days on Wednesday and other members of the opposition have had their homes searched. Ilya Yashin, a Navalny ally, said police had searched his Moscow flat overnight before detaining him and driving him out of the capital. He called for another protest next Saturday.Kira Yarmysh, Navalny’s spokeswoman, said on Twitter she had been detained on Saturday morning. Other prominent activists Dmitry Gudkov and Lyubov Sobol were also held.Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin, a Putin ally, had warned beforehand that authorities would act decisively against the risk of “serious provocations”.The police’s investigative arm has already opened a criminal investigation into an opposition rally in June which it said may have obstructed the work of Moscow’s electoral commission.An authorised protest in Moscow last weekend, also calling for the disbarred candidates to be registered, was attended by more than 20,000 people, according to the White Counter monitoring group.WhatsApp 1 of 12 Law enforcement officers detain a participant of a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Shamil Zhumatov SharePrint Law enforcement officers detain a participant of a rally calling for opposition candidates to be registered for elections to Moscow City Duma, the capital’s regional parliament, in Moscow, Russia July 27, 2019. REUTERS/Tatyana Makeyeva <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more