California and Vermont added most construction jobs in January

first_imgVermont showed surprisingly positive results in January in both construction employment and construction contracts. Thirty-six states lost construction jobs between January 2010 and 2011, even as more states added construction jobs than lost them between December and January, the Associated General Contractors of America reported in an analysis of state employment data released today by the Labor Department. Association officials cautioned that despite the increase in monthly employment, the construction industry is still facing severe economic headwinds.‘It is encouraging to see more states adding jobs instead of losing them between December and January,’ said Ken Simonson, the association’s chief economist. ‘Yet despite those monthly gains, we’re still a long way from seeing the kind of construction employment figures states experienced in 2006 and 2007.’FW Dodge reports. Top group, January 2011; bottom group, December 2010.The largest percentage drop in construction employment for the year occurred in Nevada (-12.9 percent, -8,400 jobs), followed by Georgia (-12.5 percent, -19,100 jobs); Wisconsin (-8.2 percent, -8,000 jobs); and Kentucky (-8.2 percent, 5,700 jobs). Florida lost the most construction jobs over the past 12 months (-24,000 jobs, -6.7 percent). Other states experiencing large overall declines in construction employment included Georgia; North Carolina (-13,900 jobs, 7.7 percent); and New York (-12,500 jobs, -4.0 percent).Simonson noted fourteen states and the District of Columbia added construction jobs between January 2010 and January 2011. Texas added the largest number of construction jobs for the year (33,400 jobs, 5.9 percent). Other states adding large numbers of construction jobs included Michigan (8,300 jobs, 6.8 percent); Pennsylvania (7,100 jobs, 3.3 percent); and Tennessee (4,400 jobs, 4.3 percent). Maine, meanwhile, added the highest percentage of new construction jobs (8.7 percent, 2,100 jobs), Simonson noted.Harsh winter weather affecting much of the country in January likely contributed to some of the annual and monthly state job losses, Simonson cautioned. Among the 20 states losing construction jobs between December and January, Georgia lost the most (-6,300 jobs, -4.5 percent). Other states losing large numbers of jobs included North Carolina (-5,100 jobs, -3.0 percent) and Kansas (-4,800 jobs, -8.9 percent). Kansas lost the highest percentage of construction jobs, followed by South Dakota (-4.8 percent, -1,000 jobs) and South Carolina (-4.6 percent, -3,600 jobs).Twenty-nine states and the District of Columbia added construction jobs between December and January, while employment levels in Delaware remained unchanged, Simonson noted. California added the highest number of jobs (17,800 jobs, 3.2 percent), followed by Illinois (8,800 jobs, 4.6 percent); Michigan (5,900 jobs, 4.7 percent); and Ohio (5,200 jobs, 3.2 percent). Vermont added the highest percentage of construction jobs (5.4 percent, 700 jobs); followed by Maine (5.2 percent, 1,300 jobs); Michigan; and Illinois.Association officials said the new construction employment figures indicate that more needs to be done to help the construction industry recover. They noted that the association was planning to release a comprehensive set of recommendations on March 15th designed to boost private sector demand for construction, help the nation address the infrastructure deficit and cut needless regulations and red tape.‘Allowing this industry to continue to stagnate will have significant long-term impacts on the strength of the labor market and the quality of America’s private and public buildings and infrastructure,’ said Stephen E. Sandherr, the association’s chief executive officer.View construction employment figures by state and by rank.last_img read more

Point-counterpoint: Worst sound in sports

first_imgKevin HagstromHaving endured 27 roars by the Nittany Lions for every Penn State first down during last Saturday’s football game, I began sifting through the worst chants or in-game sound bites in sports. One of the first that popped up is close to home: “First-and-10 Wisconsin.” As mind-numbing as repeating exactly what the PA announcer said is, at least it’s well-known. The chant I’m about to throw out on a whim, however, makes sense to no more than a handful of people. Plus, it’s a good thing that it doesn’t go down on the field. We’re not talking about practice; we’re talking about the School of Practical Science of Toronto University’s chant. Never heard of it? Well, duh. No one else has either, which is why the chant is so ridiculous — “Who are we? Can’t you guess? We are from the S.P.S.!”Now who in his right mind comes up with a chant that means little without explanation? And no, I can’t guess.The School of Practical Science may be good at math and applied sciences but by golly, it sure doesn’t know how to communicate ideas in a clear and concise manner; it’s asking for trouble by formulating the chant into several questions followed by a vague acronym. It’s like saying to Michigan running back Mike Hart after talking to him once, “Remember me? I’m Kevin.” He isn’t going to know what’s going on or who I am. Nor will he care. “Why have a cheer? It doesn’t make sense. Can you believe it? S.P.S. is quite dense.”Ben VoelkelIn the vast world of sports arenas, certain characteristics and traditions stand out and eventually become synonymous with the team and arena. What would an Oakland Raiders game be without the Black Hole or a Detroit Red Wings game without octopi on the ice after a hat trick?The same goes for in-game sound bites and chants. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers Raymond James Stadium is known for the pirate ship that fires a cannon after the home team scores a touchdown. What would a Minnesota Vikings game at the Metrodome be without the god-awful, obnoxious Viking horn noise? A little easier on the ears possibly, but it would still be missing that something. And even a little closer to home, a Badger football Saturday without “Eat shit, fuck you” echoing off the walls of Kellner Hall and Camp Randall’s upper deck would mean an unusual PG-13 atmosphere.But just because it is tradition, doesn’t mean it’s good. As bad as the Vikings horn is, that pales in comparison to the worst chant at a sports event.That distinction goes to DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL.No, caps lock didn’t stick. The chant, a creation of Pistons’ public address announcer John Mason, might be OK if it wasn’t repeated seemingly every time the Pistons take control of the ball. Opposing team’s center dribbles the ball off his foot and out of bounds one minute into the game: DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. Chauncy Billups gets swatted, but the ball goes out of bounds, and the Pistons keep it: DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. The home team gets the ball to start the third quarter: DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. It’s not just the repetition that makes it worst, but the painful, arrogant tone in which it’s done. DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. COU-NT I-T!last_img read more

Syracuse sweeps weekend series behind Bellefontaine’s 2 goals

first_img Published on October 20, 2018 at 10:32 pm Contact Danny: dremerma@syr.edu | @DannyEmerman A night after outlasting Lindenwood in overtime for its first win of the season, SU (2-3-0, 2-2-0 College Hockey America) completed the weekend series sweep with a decisive 6-3 win in which it had the shots on goal advantage of 34 to 20. Freshman forward Lauren Bellefontaine led the Orange with two goals and an assist in the victory over Lindenwood University (1-5-0, 0-2-0).Most of the game’s scoring came in the first period. Eight minutes into the game, sophomore defenseman Jessica DiGirolamo put the Orange on the board. She capitalized seven seconds into a power-play with her third goal of the year. DiGirolamo leads SU in points with six—three goals and three assists.Two minutes later, fifth-year senior Dakota Derrer made it 2-0 by scoring her first goal of the season.Syracuse’s lead was short-lived. Lindenwood responded with three minutes left in the first period with a goal from Sierra Burt and then another from Hannah Alt on a power-play.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter a power-play goal from Emma Polaski, her third of the season, SU took a 3-2 lead into the first intermission.In the second period, the Orange pulled away. SU killed two power-plays before extending its lead to 4-2 with a goal from Bellefontaine. Later in the period, SU found its groove and attempted 13 shots in a row before Bellefontaine found the nylon again for her second goal of the night, giving SU a 5-2 cushion.After the second period, SU held a 28-12 advantage in shots on goal. Lindenwood’s goal 14 minutes into the final period made it 5-3, but could not jump-start a serious comeback effort for the Lions. SU junior Anonda Hoppner scored a short-handed empty-net goal late in the third period to secure the victory. The Orange’s goaltending situation did not get any clearer, as Welch recorded 17 saves the night after Ady Cohen allowed four goals on 12 shots. Cohen appeared to have the edge in the positional battle after a strong performance against Mercyhurst in her first career start last Saturday. Syracuse head coach Paul Flanagan expects one goalie to “emerge,” but plans to play both Welch and Cohen meaningful minutes. It is unclear who Flanagan will give the nod to Tuesday when the Orange travel to Cornell University.   Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more