QPR back to prepare for Fulham clash

first_imgThe QPR squad have arrived back in England following a five-day visit to Portugal.Manager Mark Hughes was keen to take his players for a break in the sun ahead of the all-important run-in to the season.Rangers, who are two places above the relegation zone, face Hughes’ former club Fulham in a west London derby at Loftus Road on Saturday.Recent signing Samba Diakite, who met his new team-mates during the trip, is expected to make his R’s debut.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

South African sports trivia

first_imgWho was the first black South African to play professional football in Europe? Who’s the most economical bowler in cricket history? Who kicked the most drop- goals ever in a rugby test match? Which sportsman can claim to have suffered the most jet-lag?Take a quick spin through our assortment of South African sports trivia.FOOTBALLPule ‘Ace’ Ntsoelengoe, the midfield general of many fine Kaizer Chiefs teams of the mid-1970s to mid-1980s, was inducted into the US Soccer Hall of Fame in October 2003. One of the North American Soccer League’s all-time leaders for both appearances and goals, “Ace” was voted onto the NASL’s All Star line-up in 1979 and 1982. Former South Africa coach Clive Barker – among many others – rates Ace as perhaps the best player South Africa has ever produced.Long before Lucas Radebe made his mark at Leeds United, becoming “The Chief” in the club’s central defence, there was another South African who served the club with distinction. Albert Johanneson was a left wing who represented the All Whites in 200 matches in the 1960s, netting 68 times.Who is he? He’s had a street in Amsterdam named after him. He’s had a book written and a film made about him. He was the first black South African to play professional football in Europe. After signing for English club Coventry City in 1955, he went on to achieve superstar status playing for Dutch side Heracles and later for Torino in Italy, becoming one of a few players in Europe to earn £10 000 a year. Who is he?RUGBYSpringbok flyhalf Jannie de Beer holds the world record for most dropped goals in a test match. Playing against England in the quarterfinals of the Rugby World Cup in October 1999, De Beer kicked five dropped goals, all in the second half, as South Africa won 44-21. De Beer scored 34 points.From 23 August 1997 to 28 November 1998, the Springboks won 17 successive rugby tests to equal the world record. Their record included three wins against Australia, two wins against New Zealand, two wins against England and two wins against France.Kitch Christie, who coached the Springboks to World Cup success in 1995, was in charge of the Boks for 14 tests. Those matches all ended in victory.Long before South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994, Errol Tobias sealed his place in South African rugby history by becoming the first black player to start a test match for the Springboks, when he faced Ireland at Newlands on 30 May 1981. He was 31 at the time. In the four matches that Tobias played at flyhalf, South Africa scored 122 points, running in 18 tries, 12 of them by backline players. He played 15 times for the Springboks, including in six Tests – all of which South Africa won.Jonathan Kaplan set a world first by becoming the first referee in the history of rugby to take charge of 50 tests when he took the whistle in the 2009 Six Nations contest between Scotland and Ireland at Murrayfield.CRICKETGraeme Pollock’s test batting average of 60.97 is the second-highest in history, the highest ever by a left hander, and he is one of only four batsmen to average over 60 in a Test career. In February 2009, Pollock was voted into the International Cricket Council’s Hall of Fame as a member of the inaugural class of inductees.Who is he? In just 41 Tests, having made his test debut at the age of 34, he scored 2 484 runs at an average of 40.06, with five centuries and 15 fifties. He also captured 47 wickets at an average 39.55 runs per wicket. He never represented South Africa, yet he was nominated as one of the country’s cricketers of the 20th century. Who is he? Geoff Griffin is the only South African to take a hat-trick in test cricket. He achieved the feat against England at Lords on 23 June 1960. Later in the match he was no-balled for throwing – one of only 11 players to suffer that fate! It proved to be the final test of his career.Among bowlers that played 20 or more tests, South African all-rounder Trevor Goddard is the most economical bowler in history, conceding only 1.64 runs per over.Mike Procter shares the world record with CB Fry and Sir Donald Bradman of scoring six first-class centuries in succession. Showing that he was a fine all-rounder too, Procter is the only cricketer in history to capture two all-LBW hat-tricks.Barry Richards once scored 325 runs in a day, playing for South Australia against Western Australia. He went on to score 356, the highest first-class score by a South African batsman. In January 2009, Richards was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame as one of the initial 55 players to be honoured.When left-handed opening batsman Gary Kirsten scored 150 against Bangladesh in October 2002, he became the first batsman in test history to score a century against all nine other test-playing countries.And who can forget …? He had shortcomings as a batsman, but was effective and consistent. His third test century was South Africa’s fastest in terms of balls faced. He holds the world record for the most catches – five – by a non- wicketkeeper in a one-day international. Yet his story is definitely not told by his career statistics. Do you remember that run out?Umpire Rudi Koertzen made history on 11 July 2009 when he became the first man to umpire 200 one-day internationals. On 16 July, he became only the second man to stand in 100 tests when he took to the field in the second Ashes test between England and Australia.ATHLETICSReggie Walker won the 100 metres at the Olympic Games in London in 1908 – the only South African, and African, to have won the Olympic 100 metres title.In 1979, Matthews ‘Loop- en-val’ Motshwarateu became the first South African to run the 10 000 metres in under 28 minutes, in one of the most sensational performances in SA athletics history – only three other South Africans have since beaten his time of 27 minutes and 48.2 seconds. “Loop-en-val” was also the first black South African athlete to break a world record, and still holds the SA 10km road record. Check out the full story – and origin of his nickname, which translates as Run and fall.The Comrades, widely regarded as the world’s greatest ultra-marathon, belonged to one man throughout the 1980s. Bruce Fordyce won the event one nine occasions: in 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988 and 1990. He didn’t win in 1989, but then again he didn’t run that year …Two of the biggest names in triathlon history grew up in Durban, South Africa, but never represented the country. Paula Newby-Fraser, representing Zimbabwe, was an eight-time Ironman world champion, while Simon Lessing, representing Great Britain, was a five-time world champion.Okkert Brits is one of only 15 athletes in history to clear six metres in the pole vault. He became the third man in history to achieve the feat when he cleared 6.03m in 1995.BOXINGAfter boxer Brian Mitchell won the WBA junior-lightweight title in 1986, he successfully defended it on 12 occasions before retiring as an undefeated champion. All of his title defences took place outside of South Africa. In December 2008, Mitchell was elected to the International Boxing Hall of Fame, the first South African boxer to achieve the honour …… but not the first South African. Boxing referee Stan Christodoulou , only the third man in history to referee more than 100 world title fights, and the first to referee world title fights in all 17 weight categories, was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2004.‘Baby Jake’ Matlala, watched by former President Nelson Mandela and American actor Will Smith, brought the curtain down on a 22-year professional career on 3 March 2002 with a seventh- round stoppage win over Juan Herrera to retain his WBU junior flyweight title. At just 4ft 10in or 147cm – not much taller than the average 3ft 6in or 107cm tall Lord of the Rings hobbit – Baby Jake was the shortest ever world boxing champion.GOLFSouth African golfing legend Gary Player is one of only five players to have won golf’s Grand Slam of the US Masters, US Open, British Open and US PGA titles. Player is also one of only three golfers to win the British Open in three different decades – in 1959, 1968 and 1974. (The other two players to win the Open in three different decades did so in the nineteenth century.)During his career, Player has won 163 tournaments all over the world, jetting an estimated total of 17.5-million kilometres, more than any other athlete in history – and he’s still flying, playing, and winning.Sewsunker ‘Papwa’ Sewgolum played at the same time as Gary Player, but apartheid prevented him from making his mark around the world. How good was he? In 1965, when Player won the US Open, the World Cup Invitational, the South African Open, the Australian Open, the World Series, the World Matchplay and the NTL Challenge Cup, he finished second in the Natal Open. Sewgolum beat him.A self-taught golfer, Sewgolum played the game with a back-handed grip, hands positioned the opposite way to the traditional grip. The unorthodox grip has another name – the Sewsunker grip – named after him, because he used it with such success.Golfer Sally Little first made her mark when she was named the LPGA Rookie of the Year in 1971/72. She went on to win 15 LPGA titles, including three majors, and in 1985 became the LPGA’s twelfth millionaire.SWIMMINGOne-legged swimmer Natalie du Toit made history when she qualified for the final of the 800 metres freestyle at the 2002 Commonwealth Games – the athlete with disability ever to qualify for the final of an international able-bodied event. In 2008, Du Toit became the first athlete with a disability to compete at the Olympic Games, finishing 16th in the 10-kilometre open water event.Breaststroke swimmer Penny Heyns, an Olympic champion at 100 and 200 metres, broke four world records over those distances in the space of two days in July 1999. She went on to set eight world records in 11 races.Karen Muir was voted into Swimming’s Hall of Fame in 1980. She became the youngest ever world record holder in any sport in 1965, at age 12, when she established a new mark in the 110 yards backstroke. She went on to set 15 world records.Terence Parkin is the most successful swimmer in the history of the Deaflympics, accumulating 29 medals in total after the conclusion of the 2009 edition of the Games. In 2000, he won a silver medal in the 200 metres breaststroke at the Sydney Olympic Games. He has also won the Midmar Mile twice.Speaking about the Midmar Mile, it is the world’s largest open water swimming event and is recognised as such by Guinness World Records. It was first held in 1973 because petrol restrictions at that time prevented a group of friends from attending the Buffalo Mile in East London. Now held over two days to accommodate all the swimmers, it has drawn in excess of 17 000 competitors.TENNISBob Hewitt and Frew McMillan won 57 career doubles titles, including three Wimbledon crowns. After teaming up they played 45 matches before they suffered their first loss.Wayne Ferreira was a far greater player than many South Africans gave him credit for, as one little-known fact reveals: he boasted a 6-7 career head-to-head record against Pete Sampras. He also cannot be faulted for perseverance: he ended his career having played in a record 56 Grand Slam tournaments in succession.South Africa has one Davis Cup title to its credit – but not one that it likes to boast about. When India withdrew from the final in 1974 in protest against the South African government’s apartheid policy, South Africa became the winner by default.MOTORSPORTJody Scheckter is the only South African to have won motor racing’s Formula One title. He achieved the feat driving for Ferrari in 1979. The Italian team had to wait another 21 years for their next driver’s title, won by Michael Schumacher.Motorcross star Greg Albertyn made his mark overseas, winning the 125cc world title in 1992, followed by the world 250cc title in 1993 and 1994. He then moved to the United States, where he won the 250cc motorcross title in 1999.South African powerboat racing legend Peter Lindenberg won the national Formula One title 15 times between from 1981 to 2001. He might have won even more titles had he not also competed in the Powerboat Racing World Series.CANOEING AND PADDLE-SKIINGGraeme Pope-Ellis won the tough three-day Dusi Canoe Marathon, contested between Pietermaritzburg and Durban, on 15 occasions, competing in both singles and doubles. Not surprisingly he was known as “the Dusi King”.Paddle-skier Oscar Chalupsky has won the Molokai Challenge, considered the world championship of solo ocean paddling, a record 11 times. Seven of those titles came in succession, from 1983 to 1989.OTHER SPORTSThe Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour is the world’s largest individually timed cycling event. It has attracted fields as large as 40 000 competitors.Downhill mountain bike racer Greg Minnaar is a three-time winner of the overall UCI World Cup title, in 2001, 2005, and 2008. He also won the World Championships in 2003. Minnaar has achieved more podium finishes than any downhill rider in World Cup history.Shaun Thomson won the world surfing title in 1977. Maybe a greater claim to fame for the man from Durban is that many regard him as the best tube rider of all time.Striker Pietie Coetzee became the all-time leading goal scorer in women’s international hockey on 21 June 2011 with the third of four goals she scored in a 5-5 draw against the USA in the Champions Challenge in Dublin. It took her to 221 goals, bettering the 20-year-old world record of Russia’s Natalya Krasnikova. She retired from international hockey in June 2014 having scored 282 goals in 287 matches. Incredibly, those figures included a five-year hiatus in the prime of her career to concentrate on her studies.Reg Park won the Mr Universe bodybuilding title in 1958 and 1965. He appeared in movies as Hercules between his two wins, and went on to become Arnold Schwarzenegger’s bodybuilding inspiration.The South African men’s bowls team, playing in the World Bowls Championships on home soil in 1976, achieved the unique feat of winning every single title on offer. Doug Watson was crowned singles champion. He and Bill Moseley won the pairs. Kevin Campbell, Nando Gatti and Kelvin Lightfoot triumphed in the triples, and Campbell, Gatti, Lightfoot and Moseley captured the fours title.Anneli Wucherpfenning (Drummond-Hay) enjoyed a spectacular sporting career in show jumping, winning the sport’s biggest event, the Badminton Trials, by the biggest margin in history. Among her other victories were wins in the British Championships, Bughley Horse Trials, the Imperial Cup, the Queen Elizabeth Cup, and the British Jumping Derby.On the subject of sporting greats who grew up, or at least were born in, South Africa: Gary Anderson, the scorer of the second most points in the history of America’s National Football League (NFL), was born in Parys and raised in Durban. And Steve Nash, the two-time Most Valuable Player in the NBA, was born in Johannesburg.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

How long can a corn seed hold its breath?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Andy Westhoven, AgriGold regional agronomistAt this point in the calendar, undoubtedly, there are many corn fields planted around the area. Just as undoubtedly, planting conditions will be like the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears — some will be too cold and wet, some too hot and dry, and some just right. The role as an agronomist usually travels down the road of the first two situations in Goldilocks’ tale — less than ideal planting conditions. Somewhere in the eastern Corn Belt, after a corn field has been planted, a torrential rainfall will occur and/or there will be a cold period where a grower might wonder, “What is to become of the corn seed I just planted? How long can it last in the soil before rotting and dying?”Last season almost gave growers a false impression of corn emergence when most fields emerged in about 8 days. This is certainly not the norm. Most growers would average close to 12 to 14 days for corn to emerge year in and year out. It is a general understanding that corn seed treatments can last 3 weeks give or take. This is also the answer to the title question: How long can corn seed hold its breath? The answer is 3 weeks. The best way to improve upon a more rapid and uniform emergence is to plant into a warming trend.Easier said than done, right? From the time of planting the seed until emergence, the best defense a corn seed has is the seed treatment, as it does not have any natural defenses. Typical corn seed treatments consist of fungicide and insecticide protection. The fungicides usually play the larger part during the “hold my breath” moment.With temperatures in the mid to low 60s, field saturation, and cloudy weather are the perfect environment for slow to little corn seed growth and development. When a corn seed is not developing, pathogens — namely Pythium and Fusarium — could potentially attack a vulnerable seed. Once an infection occurs, it still could take up to several weeks to know the consequences. If the corn seed germinates and emerges, the disease could still ultimately kill the plant before it can “outgrow” the pathogen. In this case, the best advice is for warmer and drier weather for a period where the balance of power can be swayed back into the corn seed’s favor for rapid growth. Rapid growth is really the best medicine for a disease-infected corn seed or seedling.In addition to the disease threats, many insects prey on vulnerable seeds. During a prolonged emergence period, insects such as white grubs, wireworms, and seed corn maggot are the most common culprits to feed on corn seeds. While most seed treatments provide excellent protection in this arena, it is not uncommon to find hotspots in a field based on a variety of different reasons.Ironically enough when you consider a seed holding its breath, oxygen in the soil is another factor one must consider about seed viability/longevity in the soil. Any practice that reduces oxygen or pore space in the soil profile can also cause seed germination/emergence issues. Obviously, a wet, saturated field would qualify here. Outside of weather conditions, though, compaction can be a large threat.Compaction could be caused from heavy equipment. But, if one dives deeper, there is often planter compaction caused from too much down pressure. This is the pressure that is placed by the actual row unit being either too heavy and/or having too much pressure applied. Most of these can be reduced by planter settings, but still can be a hidden problem.In that ideal world, most would simply hit repeat of the 2018 spring season. Unfortunately, there is no easy button here and each year, farm, and field present unique challenges that keep all operators on their toes. Let’s hope that everyone finds that warming trend!last_img read more

Double gold for PH boxing as Marcial, Marvin deliver

first_imgDon’t miss out on the latest news and information. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Biggest Pogo service provider padlocked for tax evasion LATEST STORIES Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Eumir Felix Marcial of the Philippines (Blue) competes against Pathomsak Kuttiya of Thailand (Red) in the finals of the men’s middleweight class of the 29th Southeast Asian Games boxing competition. Marcial prevailed to claim the gold medal. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/POOLEumir Marcial pounded Thai Pathomsak Kuttiya for his second straight gold medal in the Southeast Asian Games, this time in the middleweight division in the Kuala Lumpur Games Thursday.Now fighting as a middleweight, Marcial was also the top boxer in the welterweight division in the 2015 Singapore Games.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side MOST READ John Marvin of the Philippines competes against Adli Hafidz Bin Mohd Pauzi of Malaysia in the finals of the light heavyweight division of the 29th Southeast Asian Games boxing competition. Tupas won to pocket the gold medal. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/POOLLight heavyweight John Marvin also triumphed for the Philippines earning a stoppage victory to win the gold against Malaysian Adli Hapidz Bin Mohd Fauzi.The ring official stopped the action just 21 seconds into the fight with Marvin dominating the hometown bet on all angles.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games openingMario Fernandez, meanwhile, settled for the silver in the bantamweight division after Chatchai Butdee of Indonesia bagged the gold.  Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul UFC: Rival Cormier responds to Jones’ failed drug test View commentslast_img read more

IT capital Bangalore hides an underbelly of illiteracy

first_imgChildren from impoverished backgrounds remain excluded.During the past 10 years when Bangalore grew as a boomtown of infotech it has also witnessed an increase in the number of people who cannot read and write. Bangalore has a comparatively high literacy rate of 88.48 per cent. But when Bangalore’s population jumped from about 65 lakhs to 96 lakhs the growth included an increased number of illiterates – 8,447 to be precise.T K Anil Kumar, director, census operations (Karnataka), said that literacy is a complex issue to understand. Experts said that though the number appears small, it in effect means more illiterate people are coming into Bangalore. Normally, as had happened elsewhere in the state – except Bangalore and Yadgir – the number of illiterates decrease as educational opportunities increase and a new literate generation enters the population.A population growth of over 45 per cent indicates that migration accounts for about 30 per cent, pointed out Prof K S James, an expert in demography at the Institute for Social and Economic Change (ISEC), Bangalore.The natural growth is just about 15 per cent. “Clearly there has been migration of illiterate groups.” There are large scale construction sites which attract migrant labourers.”It is surprising that Bangalore being a hub of knowledge shows pathetic performance on literacy,” said Prof R S Deshpande, director of ISEC. “In Bangalore most of the corporate sector is happy with the cheap migrant labour. But rarely do they think about the children who are brought here.” Children migrating to Bangalore are often busy working or looking after their siblings, Deshpande added.advertisementChild labour is still prevalent in Bangalore despite NGO inter vention and state- sponosored programmes. A nun who started a school in a poorer area of the city many years ago said she made the decision after seeing labourers going to work with their toddlers tied to a tree near the work area. Still there is no good institutional mechanism to look after labourers’ children.There are policy issues too.National Policy on Education 1986 and the Revised version of 1992 laid emphasis on strengthening school education as well as enhancing literacy rate.Accordingly the National Literacy Mission was created and programmes were launched as part of Total Literacy Campaigns (TLCs) across the Nation. “It was literally a social movement,” said Dr Niranjanaradhya V P, fellow at the Centre for Child and the Law at NLSIU. It later got diluted and a project approach replaced this social movement with nontransparent initiatives supported by external agencies, he pointed out. “We need to create reasonably good access to the children coming from marginalised communities to receive reasonably good quality education.” There should be a well- designed literacy programme for all who require it after 18 plus, connecting it to their day to day life. In metros like Bangalore the programme should be in more than one language. ===Everybody loves a good political crisis It is that time of the year when the Karnataka government is in crisis. Everybody knows it by experiencing the traffic jam in front of the Raj Bhavan and the police bandobast that causes further blockages along important roads. Visitors are barred from the Vidhana Soudha.Cars of political leaders are seen parked in rows in front of the Raj Bhavan gate. You get to see politicians, clad in the customary white shirt and white trousers, just like the chief minister. Some look worried. The dhoti-clad leaders normally come from the north of the state; some sport green shawls.Outside broadcast (OB) vans with their dish antennae are also seen parked in front of the Raj Bhavan. The crew sometimes has round the clock duty. Correspondents from small news bureaus have a tough time covering simultaneous press briefings at far-away venues.Many run out of battery in their cell phones and laptops and go incommunicado.The street-side hawkers, however, enjoy the show. They gather at the Raj Bhavan and sell groundnut, bhelpuri and buttermilk – to MLAs and journalists. They do it boldly, right under the noses of policemen who would have beaten them up on normal days for daring to be seen in such a sensitive spot. ===Bangalore to become a biofuel boomtown After IT, BPOs and biotechnology, the next wave in Bangalore could well be alternative energy. Products and processes are in the pipeline. The credit for some of them goes to Dr Rajah Vijay Kumar, a researcher in biophysics, nanotechnology, and sustainable energy.Scalene Energy Research Institute (SERI) that he heads has the technology to produce electricity from waste – food, vegetables, meat, husk, municipal waste, water weeds, spent grain left after brewing beer.advertisementPurely cultured bacteria from SERI’s lab break them all down to produce natural gas. The science is called Microbe Incubated Bioreactor (MIBR).The SERI campus has a gas plant that runs on water hyacinth collected from a nearby lake, called the ‘oil well’. ‘Serigas’ runs a 1.2 megawatt capacity unit that lights up and cools down the campus and keeps the stoves flaming at the campus kitchen for 80 personnel. A tonne of waste a day can produce 300 kg of gas.Scalene has now come out with a micro plant for kitchens that runs on vegetable peels, food waste and old newspapers. Kumar’s logic is that a small home produces 2.5 to 3 kg of waste, including newspapers – enough to produce half a kilo gas a day. That is roughly the consumption in an average home.After developing a Rs 50,000 prototype, Kumar would like sell it for Rs 12,000. The ITI Limited, a public sector firm, is trying to value-engineer it to look more like an appliance. === Chandrayaan a hit with city kids ISRO may have it own share of worries with its giant launcher GSLV failing twice recently, but the space agency is upbeat about its achievements in general.And it makes it a point to reach out to the people, especially students.Senior ISRO scientists travel across the country and abroad to tell people about India’s space programme. They conduct exhibitions in schools and colleges and install satellite and launcher models. The crowdpuller is ISRO’s set of colourful panels that tell the story of India’s first moon mission. In 20 colourful panels it describes the project from its conception to the launch and explains lunar science in simple terms – What are lunar crators? How did Chandrayaan-1 find water on the surface of the moon? Accompanying the exhibition is a booklet meant for students titled ‘Chandrayaan -1 – Indian Giant Leap to Moon ‘. Written by B R Guruprasad, ISRO’s PRO, it describes how ISRO scientist graduated from sending satellites circling the earth at 36,000 km to reaching the moon that is 3,58,000 km away.Cartoons and lucidly written text mark the publication. The readership includes upper primary and high school students, Guruprasad said. Children get to hear about stories of the moon, how ancient Indians viewed it and how scientists have been trying to explore it. It is now running into multiple print orders.last_img read more