Learning life lessons by breaking bones

first_imgIt’s just a fact of life that sometimes you’ve got to learn things the hard way. I’ve learned many things this way, including a few things from one instance this weekend.You’re probably thinking I’m going to spout off some crazy Halloween story. However, as much as I wish I could’ve learned my lesson by trying to outrun a horse on State Street dressed as Lee Corso, this was even dumber.While playing a great sport — perhaps involving ping-pong balls being thrown at 10 plastic “hoops” — I slipped up and knocked one of the “hoops” over. While that is not unheard of, it is one of my biggest pet peeves.In a spat of anger and stupidity, I turned around and propelled my fist into a wall. I was pretty sure it was broken, but I played on, sinking my next three consecutive shots before deciding I probably should be done.After going about my business the rest of the night, I went in for X-rays the next day to find out I had a broken hand.So what did I learn, and how does this relate to sports, you ask? I’m glad you did … here’s the laundry list of lessons and ideas I pondered while sitting in the waiting room at the doctor’s office and relaxing with my hand and wrist in a splint over the last five days:— Things can be learned from St. Louis Cardinals reliever Julian Tavarez.No, I’m not saying it’s a good idea to change the pronunciation of your name at the beginning of every season in order to confuse everyone.But I should have learned from Tavarez that frustrated dugout tirades get you nowhere. After all, he did the same thing after a rough outing in last year’s National League Championship Series.In fact, when he punched a dugout phone, he broke two bones — one of them, the fifth metacarpal, was the same bone I broke.— Being competitive is not always a good thing.Ever since I can remember, I’ve had an unwavering competitiveness that I thought was a blessing. The only negative thing it had ever gotten me was a few technical fouls in rec-league high school basketball.In fact, as far as the previously described “sport” I was playing when I broke my hand, this competitiveness had led me to an astounding record and one major championship.Suddenly, I realized that there is such a thing as being too competitive, which leads to my next lesson.— I have always heard teams — primarily the University of Wisconsin hockey team — describe a utopian balance between hard and smart on the ice.The basic principle is that you want to play every game as hard as you can, but not to the point that you forget the systems or the basic idea of the game. Sometimes you can be firing on all cylinders, or perhaps over-firing, to the point that you don’t remember the simple things.Now I really see what they mean. I have always played hard — thus the competitive attitude — but apparently I haven’t had that balance.I was playing so hard that when I went for a block, I knocked over that “basket.” That was obviously not very smart, and neither was slamming a wall.— When fighting a wall, the wall always wins.This is pretty self-explanatory. Outside of a skirmish about a year ago in which I never threw punches, but merely sat on the guy, I had never been in a fight.Needless to say, I didn’t expect my boxing debut — and perhaps my boxing retirement — to come against an inanimate object.— Playing through the pain.I have always loved the stories of athletes playing through pain. Curt Schilling and the famous “sock game,” Kirk Gibson’s walk-off, Donovan McNabb playing through his sports hernia and Anthony Davis — oh, wait, he never played through anything more than a stubbed toe.But I digress … by sinking my next three shots with my broken hand, I feel like I can now put myself in their shoes.I know it sounds like a major exaggeration, and it probably is, but, wow, you should’ve seen the size of this thing thanks to the immediate swelling.— While it’s hard to admit after wanting to hate him last year, I have a lot of respect for Dee Brown.You see, as I was laid up I found myself reading the article in ESPN Magazine about his battle back from a broken fifth metatarsal — same injury as mine but in the foot instead of the hand.Reading about his comeback was inspirational, and I commend him for taking a leadership role despite everything that went down leading up to the NBA draft.Now we’ll see what happens when the season starts. I’m actually hoping that he does well, because I want to know that I can come back from this.I’m sure this is not the last time I will learn things the hard way, although I hope next time it’s a little less painful, a lot less annoying and doesn’t involve me being on the shelf for four to six weeks.But never fear kids, I’m still playing through this one. I’ll be here again next Wednesday, and, if you see me on the streets before then, please don’t laugh at me.Eric is a senior majoring in history. If you want to send him cookies or be his own personal nurse for the next four to six weeks, e-mail him at eschmoldt@badgerherald.com.last_img read more

DePaul treks to Madison

first_imgComing off a duo of losses to highly ranked national opponents, the No. 51 Wisconsin women’s tennis team will look to return to winning form as they take on DePaul at 4:00 PM at the Nielsen Tennis Stadium today.But the Badgers’ greatest opponent may well be their own blue demons as the squad looks to take on the regional rival while still battling a flurry of health problems that have left key players at less than 100 percent and others cycling through the bench.”[I]t appears as though we’ll be playing short-handed again,” head coach Patti Henderson said. “So we have to try to find a way to be successful in the win/loss column with DePaul.”Wisconsin junior Kaylan Caiati, who spent last weekend on the sidelines due to health issues, is expected to bump up to the second singles flight today in place of sophomore Nicole Beck who will likely see her playing time limited to doubles action because of her own ongoing ailment.”You acknowledge that first, because it’s going to be a lot tougher,” senior Lexi Goldin said of going into today’s action with a depleted roster.Still, in DePaul, the Badgers will find a team with quite the international flair. The Chicago-based squad has only two Americans on its roster and neither is expected to start in singles play, offering a stark contrast to the Wisconsin team that is comprised entirely of Americans.Team ace Caitlin Burke, hailing from Cedarburg, Wis., will likely face Beatrix Csordas, who comes from Budapest, Hungary, while Caiati, also a Dairyland native, is expected to take on Gergana Ganeva of Vratza, Bulgaria. Other members of the DePaul starting lineup have passports originating in Croatia, Serbia and Slovakia, while the Badgers’ only non-Midwesterners come to UW by way of California, Georgia and Kentucky.Last year, the Badgers defeated the Blue Demons 5-2, with Burke claiming the clinching point over Ganeva in a 6-2, 6-2 victory that marked the DePaul player’s first drop in an unlucky 13 matches. Ironically, Burke also battled the Chicago-based squad while personally under the weather a year ago, a situation that may well repeat itself as the Badger ace comes off a rough final weekend of February play in which she missed one match due to health considerations and pulled off a convincing victory in another despite coughing audibly on the court.”I haven’t been feeling very good for the last week or so,” Burke commented after her decisive victory last year. “I try not to think about, it’s hard though. I have a cold.”Having claimed only one of 14 points last weekend — with Burke being the sole singles victor — various members of the Wisconsin squad will look to regain their winning ways today in what will be the team’s final match before spring break play in sunny southern California — a location that may actually do some good for a physically ailing squad.last_img read more

Egypt matches Nigerian win, goes top of group ahead of Uganda

first_imgThe teams are in Group B — labelled the ‘group of death’ as it contains three 2014 World Cup qualifiers in Algeria, Cameroon and Nigeria.Algeria host record seven-time African qualifiers Cameroon later on Sunday in Blida, a venue where the North African Desert Foxes are virtually invincible.Iwobi of Arsenal pounced on a weak headed clearance to slam the ball past goalkeeper Kennedy Mweene from close range on 32 minutes.Neat one-touch passing set Iheanacho of Manchester City free 10 minutes later and he rounded Mweene before calmly pushing the ball into the net.A blunder from Nigeria defender Kenneth Omeruo allowed Mbesuma to score by firing past impressive goalkeeper Carl Ikeme from inside the penalty area.Just a few hours after the Nigerians became the first away winners in the African group phase, Egypt matched the achievement by defeating Congo 2-1 in Brazzaville.Ferebory Dore beat 43-year-old goalkeeper Essam El Hadary with a far-post header to give the hosts a first half lead.Mohamed Salah from Italian Serie A outfit Roma headed the equaliser just before half-time, then set up the winner for Abdallah Saied close to the hour mark.Egypt, whose last of two World Cup appearances was 26 years ago, top Group E with three points, Ghana and Uganda have one each and Congo none.Share on: WhatsApp Pages: 1 2 Egyptians celebrate and below, action in the Ghana versus Uganda game ResultsGhana 0 Uganda 0Congo 1 Egypt 2Johannesburg, South Africa | AFP | Nigeria opened their 2018 World Cup group-phase qualifying campaign with a 2-1 victory in Zambia on Sunday thanks to goals from English Premier League duo Alex Iwobi and Kelechi IheanachoThe 20-year-old strikers scored in the opening half before a capacity 40,000 crowd at Levy Mwanawasa Stadium in central city Ndola that included President Edgar Lungu.Zambia dominated the second half and veteran striker Collins Mbesuma set up a tense finish by halving the deficit 19 minutes from time.But an equaliser eluded the Chipolopolo (Copper Bullets), who are seeking a first World Cup appearance while the Super Eagles have already been to the finals five times.last_img read more

Medical Examiner: South Florida Doctor Dies from COVID-19

first_imgA South Florida doctor is the first medical professional in the region to die from the novel coronavirus.Dr. Alex Hsu, who once practiced internal medicine at Northwest Medical Center in Margate, died from the virus, Broward County Medical Examiner Dr. Craig Mallak said Thursday.The 67-year-old doctor is the fourth person from Broward County to die as a result of COVID-19.Broward County has the second-most confirmed cases of coronavirus in the state.Dr. Alex Hsu, an internist in Margate for more than 35 years, is the latest casualty of the coronavirus in South Florida.The medical examiner has confirmed that Dr. Hsu died Wednesday night from complications related to the new coronavirus.The Broward County Office of Medical Examiner and Trauma Services listed Dr. Alex Hsu’s cause of death as COVID-19 and listed the manner of death as natural.Dr. Craig Mallak said no autopsy was performed.According to sharecare.com, he graduated from the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine in 1982 and completed a residency at the University of Louisville.“Our community was very saddened by the news of Dr. Alex Hsu. He was very genuine. He never denied anyone without insurance,” family friend Lana Van said in a statement.last_img read more

“Grow Monmouth” To Spur Economic Development

first_imgOne thing we do know is that we cannot wait for Washington to come up with the magical  solution. If we are to bring ourselves out of this downturn we have to do it through the creation of jobs. Getting people back to work is the key to stimulating our economy. By THOMAS A. ARNONE It has been three years since the U.S. economy nose-dived, taking jobs and consumer confidence with it. Yet despite all efforts to stimulate prosperity, the country is still reluctant to bounce back and return to happier times of healthy growth. To bolster that effort here at home, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders have launched a program called “Grow Monmouth,” a long-term communitywide initiative to ensure the economic health of Monmouth County. In recent weeks, representatives from the Monmouth County Department of Economic Development and I have met with businesses, academia, utility companies and business organizations to talk about the program and how they can become partners in this effort. Elected representatives from all 53 municipalities have been invited to attend meetings scheduled for Oct. 20 and Oct. 25 to discuss how the Grow Monmouth initiative can assist them with their economic development efforts. As part of Grow Monmouth, the county is currently developing an economic opportunity mapping tool. This is a Geographic Information System (GIS) tool that will identify various information within the municipalities. This information can help municipalities and businesses determine the most favorable locations for economic growth. Information in the GIS layering will include zoning, environmental constraints, utilities, roadways and transportation.center_img It’s no secret that what our economy needs right now is jobs. In order to create jobs, our businesses need all the help they can get. County government’s role is to facilitate job creation and business expansion. The objective of these meetings is to gather input from a variety of key sectors and develop a strategic plan that will outline goals and the means to achieving them. The county is also establishing an Advisory Committee to provide input to the plan. Grow Monmouth will also provide assistance to businesses to help maximize their potential for growth. A business-building toolkit has been developed. The toolkit includes resources for competitive business information research, business to business and consumer mailing lists, survey capability, and Web site optimization. ***ITALS Thomas A. Arnone is a Monmouth County freeholder This initiative has three objectives: retain and grow businesses in Monmouth County; retain and create jobs in Monmouth County, and to encourage the attraction of new businesses to Monmouth County.last_img read more

New Jersey Trivia for a Pandemic

first_imgThe article originally appeared in the May 7th – May 13th, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times. 4. What are the three prominent tree species in Monmouth County forests? In 1609, Henry Hudson, and his crew aboard the Dutch vessel Half-Moon spotted land in what is now Monmouth County most likely off Sandy Hook; however, some historical accounts credit this landing to present-day Keansburg. According to legend, Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly, also known as “Molly Pitcher,” delivered water to her husband’s battery to cool the cannons and soldiers during the battle of Monmouth Court House in 1778. When her husband was wounded, Molly took her husband’s place as a member of the cannon crew for the remainder of the battle. Monmouth County is named for Monmouth, Wales. 3. From where does Monmouth County derive its name? COURTESY ELIZABETH WULFHORST The Sandy Hook Lighthouse 2. Who was Mary Ludwig Hays McCauly and what role did she play in New Jerseyand American history? The lighthouse on the northern tip of the Gateway National Recreation Area in SandyHook, built in 1764, is the oldest lighthouse still in operation in the U.S. 5. Who was the first European to set foot in present-day Monmouth County? Monmouth County is forested primarily with oak, hickory and shortleaf pine. 1. Where is the oldest lighthouse still in operation in the U.S.? By Mrs. Silence Dogoodlast_img read more

Nelson Toyota, Northport advance to Men’s Basketball League Final

first_imgNelson Toyota and Northport will meet in the final of the West Kootenay Men’s Basketball League after scoring win in semi final action Monday in Nelson and Rossland.Nelson Toyota built up a big lead then held off a late charge to upset regular season champ Empire Coffee 88-78 at the L.V. Rogers Hangar.Meanwhile, Northport defeated Flying Steamshovel of Rossland 75-55 to secure the other spot in the final.last_img