Vermont Receives Over $2 Million to Support At-Risk Veterans

first_imgVermont Receives Over $2 Million to Support At-Risk VeteransWaterbury, VT-The Vermont Agency of Human Services (AHS) Department of Mental Health (DMH) has announced the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) has awarded Vermont a five year, $2.1 million grant to create an infrastructure project to serve veterans of all conflicts with trauma-spectrum illnesses, who are at risk or have already become involved with the criminal justice system.”Vermont’s veterans, who have so selflessly protected the liberties we all enjoy, deserve the most caring, compassionate services we can provide to them when they are in need,” said Governor Jim Douglas. “Vermont has a proud tradition of providing these supports to our state’s veterans, and we are truly pleased that the federal government has recognized the quality of these services through their support of this new initiative.”The grant will support the creation of a statewide intergovernmental initiative intended to address the needs of Vermont veterans and other adults with trauma spectrum-illness who are involved in the criminal justice system through identification, screening and assessment, and diversion from the criminal justice system to evidence-based treatment and supports.During the project’s first three years, DMH will pilot its infrastructure and intervention model in Chittenden County, screening an estimated 14,000 veterans and other adults in the criminal justice system for trauma-related illness and diverting an estimated 300 from detention to evidence-based treatment and supports. In years three through five, the project will progress toward statewide implementation, screening approximately an additional 24,500 adults and diverting roughly 525 to treatment. Over the grant term, about 38,500 adults will be screened and roughly 825 will be diverted to evidence-based care, resulting in increased access to trauma informed services and evidence-based trauma treatment and community supports for these veterans.”The Agency of Human Services is fully committed to ensuring that veterans and their families have access to comprehensive supports, particularly through our involvement with the Military, Family and Community Network and our promotion of the employment of veterans through our Division for Vocational Rehabilitation,” said Cynthia D. LaWare, Secretary of AHS. “This SAMHSA grant to our Department of Mental Health will enable us to leverage existing resources as we continue to help at-risk veterans achieve success and support successful community reintegration.””This grant will enhance current efforts by DMH, the Department of Corrections, the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program Division of the Health Department, and the Court Administrator to focus on better interventions for persons involved with or at risk of involvement with the criminal justice system,” added DMH Commissioner Michael Hartman. “Together with ongoing efforts by the Veterans Administration and local veterans groups, this grant will help more veterans access valuable services and supports.”DMH and community partners are currently working out the details of a plan to implement these expanded services for veterans.#####last_img read more

2 Convicted of Scamming Long Islanders Out of Millions

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Two Arizona men were convicted Thursday of scamming $15 million from Long Island-based investors and NHL players in elaborate schemes over the past decade, including a con involving Sag Harbor real estate.Phillip Kenner, a 46-year-old financial advisor, and Tommy Constantine, a 48-year-old race car driver, was found guilty of wire fraud, wire fraud conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy by a jury at Central Islip federal court.“Driven by personal greed, Kenner and Constantine spent years lying to investors and stealing their money, and then attempted to conceal their fraud by repeatedly and brazenly avoiding responsibility, shifting blame, and scapegoating others,” said Kelly Currie, acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of New York.Prosecutors said that Kenner bought the Sag Harbor property with $395,000 he took from a player’s line of credit without the victim’s permission and convinced another player to pay $375,000 for a 50 percent interest in the property that was later sold at a loss.Kenner also allegedly solicited victims to invest $2 million in Hawaiian real estate, money that Kenner and Constantine used to pay for personal expenses; $1.4 million Eufora LLC, a prepaid debit card business, but diverted the funds elsewhere; and $4.1 million for Mexican land deals that instead paid for Constantine’s racecar and home.Kenner had befriended a hockey player who was later drafted by an NHL team while the two enrolled at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in upstate Troy, New York, and later advised other players when he worked at a financial firm in Boston, authorities said.Kenner and Constantine face up to 20 years in prison when they are sentenced on Nov. 20. Several of the victims are also suing the suspects for the losses.last_img read more

Tunisia, Angola square off in Group E opener

first_img Tags: AFCON 2019Alain GiresseAngolaMateustopTunisia Tunisia are favourites in Group E. (PHOTOS/Agencies)AFCON 2019Tunisia vs AngolaNew Suez Stadium, SuezMonday, 24-06-2019 @8pmSUEZ – Tunisia and Angola will meet on Monday for their first matches of Africa Cup of Nations 2019 at the New Suez Stadium.With the game being the first in Group E, both teams will be looking to take the initiative before Mali take on Mauritania in the other game.Tunisia head into the encounter hoping they can kick-start their charge towards a second Africa Cup of Nations title, having won it on home soil in 2004.The Carthage Eagles have every reason to be confident after beating World Cup finalists Croatia 2-1 in their penultimate warm-up game.Manager Alain Giresse says his players are prepared for the Egyptian heat and are full of desire to go all the way.Giresse’s men are favourites to top Group E, and the former France midfielder also said he is satisfied with his players’ preparations.“We hope to make an exceptional Cup of Nations,” said Giresse.“All players are motivated by the desire to negotiate all three matches and go further in this tournament.“We put emphasis on the technical, physical and mental aspects of the players so that they are in top condition to start the tournament and ready to overcome any difficulties, such as the heat.“The players are showing great determination and good morale. The experience that some players have is going to help the team to take up the challenge and make the difference.”Angola who are featuring in only their 8th finals and will be hoping to reach the knock-out stage for only the third time.This will be their first appearance at the finals since 2013 where they were eliminated at the group stage.Angola las featured at the finals in 2013.Angola made it through a tight group on their way here, edging out Mauritania and Burkina Faso to make the tournament.They were fine in qualifying, but there’s little in their results to suggest that they’ll be much of a threat in Egypt.The Giants Sable Antelopes will put their hopes in striker Mateus who has scored 12 goals in 60 National team appearances.Match StatsTunisia have qualified for the Africa Cup of Nations finals on every occasion since 1994; they won the tournament in 2004 and have only failed to reach the knockout phase in two of the last eight editions of the AFCON.They qualified for the tournament as winners of Group J, losing only one match against Egypt along the way so they will carry confidence into this opener.Tunisia will look to dangerman Wahbi Khazri to provide the main attacking threat for them while another player who may prove a threat to opposition defences is Naïm Sliti, who was their top scorer in qualifying.Angola are back at the finals for the first time since 2013; they have not made it out of the group stage at the tournament since reaching back-to-back quarter-finals in 2008 and 2010.They qualified courtesy of finishing at the top of a qualifying group containing Mauritania, Burkina Faso and Botswana but did lose two of their three away matches during the campaign. Veteran forward Mateus was the top scorer in their qualifying group with four goals.Angola have struggled to make it out of the group stage at the Africa Cup of Nations and it appears they will face an uphill struggle to do so again with Tunisia and Mali expected to progress.The other games on Monday-Tunisia vs Angola @8pm-Mali vs Mauritania @11pmSunday’s results-Morocco 1-0 Namibia-Senegal 2-0 Tanzania-Algeria 2-0 KenyaComments last_img read more

Greenhouse emissions similar to today’s may have triggered massive temperature rise in Earth’s past

first_imgAbout 55.5 million years ago, a burst of carbon dioxide raised Earth’s temperature 5°C to 8°C, which had major impacts on numerous species of plants and wildlife. Scientists analyzing ancient soil samples now say a previous burst of the greenhouse gas preceded this event, known as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), and probably triggered it. Moreover, they believe humans are pumping similar levels of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere right now, raising concerns that our own emissions may also destabilize Earth’s climate, triggering the planet to emit devastating bursts of carbon in the future.The paper implies that even if we stopped emitting carbon dioxide right now, our descendants might still face huge temperature rises, says paleoclimatologist Gabriel Bowen of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, the lead author of the new research. “It is a possibility,” he says, “and it’s a scary one.”Scientists accept that a massive injection of carbon into the atmosphere caused the PETM, but they don’t agree about where the gas came from. Some researchers say it originated from the release of carbon locked up under the ocean by an undersea landslide; others blame a comet crashing into Earth, causing carbon from both the comet and Earth to be oxidized to carbon dioxide and potentially causing wildfires or burning of carbon-rich peat bogs on Earth. They also don’t know how long the release lasted, with recent estimates ranging from 10 years to 20,000 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)One of the best ways to measure the prehistoric release of carbon into the atmosphere is to look at the ratio of two types of carbon atoms called isotopes. Carbon has two stable isotopes: About 99% of natural carbon is carbon-12, whereas the remaining 1% is mainly the heavier carbon-13, with trace amounts of radioactive carbon-14 that decay within a few thousand years to nitrogen. Living organisms have a slight preference for the lighter isotope, so carbon derived from organic sources (such as fossil fuels) is slightly depleted in carbon-13. If that carbon gets returned to the atmosphere at a faster rate than normal, atmospheric carbon dioxide has less carbon-13 than normal. Plants taking up this carbon dioxide become even more carbon-13 depleted, and when they decompose, this depletion is recorded in the soil.Sedimentary rock samples that have been compacted from soils formed at the time of the PETM contain less carbon-13 than normal. Sedimentary rocks of the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming contain one of the best records of soils from this period. Geologists have studied them for more than 100 years, but to obtain samples from soils of different periods, geologists had to analyze surface rocks from different parts of the basin and try to piece together a continuous geological history. Therefore, the Bighorn Basin Coring Project, run by the University of New Hampshire, Durham, drilled approximately 1 km of core from each of three different points in the basin to give geologists three clear, continuous records of how the soils had varied over time in a particular place.Bowen and colleagues analyzed one of these cores, tracking the variations in carbon isotope ratios in greater detail than had been previously possible by examining surface rocks. They report online today in Nature Geoscience that in soils beneath those laid down during the main rise in temperature about 55.5 million years ago, there was a distinct drop in the proportion of carbon-13. In soils immediately on top of these, the ratio seemed to recover to its normal value. Finally, soils on top of these showed a large drop in the proportion of carbon-13 corresponding to the PETM itself.So what was going on? The researchers concluded that there must have been two separate releases of carbon. The first, smaller release, about 2000 years before the main temperature rise, was followed by a recovery to normal climatic conditions. Later, a second, larger pulse caused the main event. “I’m fairly convinced that they’re related,” Bowen says. “We see nothing remotely similar during the many hundreds of thousands of years before this event. To have within a few thousand years these two major carbon isotope shifts and have that be circumstantial would be quite remarkable.”The researchers used climate models to investigate how the initial, smaller heating could have triggered the later surge in temperature. They estimate that the first thermal pulse is likely to have warmed Earth’s atmosphere by 2°C to 3°C, but that the atmospheric temperature would have gradually returned to normal as the heat was absorbed into the deep ocean. However, when that heat finally reached the ocean floor, it might have melted methane ices called clathrates, releasing the methane into the ocean and allowing it to make its way into the atmosphere. As a greenhouse gas, methane is 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide, so a sudden spike in methane emissions could lead to huge climate change.“The connection between these two pulses is something that it’s going to be really important to get a handle on,” Bowen says. The researchers believe the rate at which carbon dioxide escaped into the atmosphere during both bursts is unlikely to have been greater than the rate at which humans are emitting it now, and it may have been considerably lower. “Carbon release back then looked a lot like human fossil fuel emissions today,” Bowen says. “So we might learn a lot about the future from changes in climate, plants, and animal communities 55.5 million years ago.”“We think this is really good news for our contention that the release of carbon was very fast,” says marine geologist James Wright of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, an advocate of the comet impact hypothesis.Wright is not convinced, however, about the importance of the first pulse in triggering the second. He suggests that the most logical interpretation of the apparent cooling after the first pulse is that its significance was less than Bowen’s group believes, with limited effect on the overall ocean temperature, and that not just the atmosphere but rather the entire planet quickly returned to normal. “If that’s the case, then the first has nothing to do with the second,” Wright says. That, in turn, would require an alternative explanation for the PETM such as a comet impact.last_img read more