Notre Dame valedictorian, Marshall Scholarship recipient shares philosophy, passions

first_imgWhen senior Sofia Carozza first arrived on campus, she knew she wanted to take as many risks as she could, especially if those risks scared her. This journey is what led her to shave her head for The Bald and the Beautiful, join Women’s Boxing and participate in Show Some Skin, among other activities.It also may have led her into some of her accomplishments. Carozza was named valedictorian for the class of 2019 and in December she was named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship. In the fall, Carozza will head to University of Cambridge in England to pursue a Ph.D.“The only thing I knew I wanted to do when I got here was take as many risks as I could,” she said. “Basically anytime I heard something that someone else was doing and my first reaction was, ‘Oh, that scares me,’ that meant I had to do it.”A self-described nerd, Carozza said she has always been interested in mental health and how the brain works, partially due to her own experiences with mental illness. This interest took form at Notre Dame as she chose to major in neuroscience and behavior with a supplementary theology minor as well as a minor in philosophy, politics and economics.“I’ve always been fascinated by the human person and human behavior in particular,” Carozza said. “During high school I suffered from mental illness, … and several people who are dear to me either experienced trauma in their childhood or suffered from mental illness. So, it was really a way for me to look at the way that biology interacts with human experience to make us into who we are and to come to terms with the fact that who we are today is a product of our experience over a lifetime.”Carozza is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture Sorin Fellow, but she said her community involvement has made the biggest impact in her life at Notre Dame. Carozza has spent her summers dedicated to the cause, tutoring children with developmental disabilities and psychiatric disorders in Paraguay, researching effects of stress on the brain and implementing ideas of community-based change in South Bend and beyond. “I do some work with the juvenile justice center, and I’ve been involved with the Catholic Worker, and I’ve volunteered for several community organizations that do mental health related stuff for early childhood development stuff,” she said. “Those relationships with community members have really transformed the way that I think about my education and the potential and the responsibility that I have to put it in the service of other people, not just in some abstract future, but right now.”Carozza is a South Bend native and has lived there her whole life. Still, Carozza didn’t see herself coming to Notre Dame. During decision season she was choosing between two schools — Harvard and Notre Dame. She said she chose Notre Dame because of the care she saw professors take with their jobs and their students. “I went abroad my junior year of high school,” Carozza said. “After getting back, I was pretty sure that I wanted to go somewhere that wasn’t in South Bend because I had experienced more of a cosmopolitan city life, and I really wanted to pop the bubble a little bit. But it was over the course of my senior year when I realized that the things that were most meaningful to me were the relationships I had with really caring mentors and experiences that really helped me grow as a person. “When I came here to visit, I was really blown away by the mission of the University and how that’s enacted on a personal level — that the professors are really here because they care about us and that students are looked at as their whole person. [They’re helped] to develop into who they’re called to be and how they’re called to serve the world.”Looking forward, Carozza said she would love to return to Notre Dame’s campus to teach.“I’d love to be back here at Notre Dame,” she said. “I love this community, and I think that the role of a professor in my life has been absolutely transformative — to have mentors who can educate me as a scholar, but also accompany me as a person to my fulfillment.”For right now, however, Carozza said she is taking some time off.“This summer I’m going backpacking some places. I’m going to pilgrimage to Our Lady of Guadalupe, and then I’m going to be spending the rest of the summer working on a farm in northern Colorado,” Carozza said. “I’m so excited to just be immersed in silence. I do best when I’m alone in a place that’s beautiful and I can read and write, so that’s my happy place.”There were times she questioned her decision to attend Notre Dame during her first couple years, Carozza said. But by now she knows she made the right choice. “Really reflecting on everything that’s happened to these past four years and all of the relationships that I’ve grown to have, I cannot imagine having made a different choice precisely because I’m a very different person than I was in high school. I’ve grown and been formed a lot, and I have a deep faith now and an awareness of who I am and what I’m called to do,” Carozza said. “Honestly I can’t imagine it having come as easily at a place other than Notre Dame.”Tags: 2019 commencement address, Commencement 2019, Marshall Scholarship, Notre Dame valedictorian, Sofia Carozzalast_img read more

Villa claim win in feisty encounter

first_img The right-back, who had been frozen out by manager Paul Lambert before this season, netted with 20 minutes left to cap their comeback. Leonardo Ulloa ended his drought with his first goal in 10 games to put the Foxes ahead but Ciaran Clark equalised within minutes. Press Association And Paul Konchesky was sent off late on for Leicester after clashing with Hutton – who was lucky to stay on – to compound the visitors’ woes. It left Nigel Pearson’s side rooted to the bottom of the Barclays Premier League and lifted resurgent Villa up to 11th. Charles N’Zogbia and Carlos Sanchez were recalled for the hosts, replacing the suspended Andi Weimann and injured Joe Cole. Danny Simpson made his first Leicester start since signing from QPR in the summer. The defender had played just 26 minutes for the Foxes this season and replaced the ill Ritchie de Laet. Liam Moore replaced suspended captain Wes Morgan and David Nugent was well enough to take his place on the bench after illness. Matty James and Benteke fired over in a quiet opening 10 minutes before Benteke’s brilliant first-time volley dropped inches wide. But the visitors took the lead on 13 minutes when Villa failed to shackle Riyad Mahrez and Guzan spilled his deflected effort straight to Ulloa who tapped in. It was a gift but Villa levelled five minutes later when Clark was granted the freedom of the area to head in Ashley Westwood’s free kick from six yards. Mahrez shot wide as Leicester responded but Villa had the measure of a spirited, if limited, Foxes side who relied on the pace of Jamie Vardy to threaten. And the striker was involved a flashpoint late in the half as tempers flared at Villa Park. First, he clattered into Westwood – forcing the midfielder to be carried off – and was lucky to only receive a caution. Then Clark caught Ulloa in a strong tackle which forced the striker off at the break, with Nugent his replacement. Mercifully for referee Craig Pawson, half-time arrived to stop the game spilling over. Tom Cleverley, who had a loan spell at Leicester in 2009, drove over three minutes into the second half before Jeff Schlupp skewed horribly over for the Foxes. Villa looked the more likely to edge ahead and Kasper Schmeichel kept the visitors level when he raced out to deny Benteke, who had run onto Sanchez’s through ball. It was another warning for the Foxes who, after going ahead, had failed to seriously test Villa. The pace of Agbonlahor continued to stretch Leicester and his angled drive was deflected away by Schmeichel after 55 minutes. But Guzan had to save Villa when he brilliantly turned over Nugent’s wonderful 18-yard volley as Leicester suddenly sparked. Their threat faded, though, as Villa completed their comeback on 70 minutes – following more shoddy defending from Foxes. Benteke was given space and time to pick out the unmarked Hutton at the far post and the defender smashed past Schmeichel. Benteke nearly added a third six minutes later, only to be thwarted again by Schmeichel’s point blank save and from the corner the keeper stopped Clark’s header. And Leicester’s hopes all but disappeared with 10 minutes left when Konchesky was dismissed. The defender tackled Hutton and then clashed with the Villa man, who forced his head into Konchesky’s before pushing him. But to the Foxes’ amazement, Konchesky was sent off while Hutton escaped with a yellow card and Villa held on. Alan Hutton bagged his first Aston Villa goal as they clinched a feisty 2-1 win over 10-man Leicester.last_img read more

More than 60 youngsters complete Malteenoes SC Cricket Academy

first_imgOVER 60 youngsters completed the Malteenoes Sports Club (MSC) Cricket Academy yesterday after two weeks of learning the fundamentals of cricket, both on and off the field.The Academy, which began on July 29, aimed at nurturing and fostering the development of aspiring cricketers.It also focussed on realising the numerous opportunities the sport can offer professionally. The sessions were conducted at the club’s Thomas Lands facility.The participants were coached by Orin Bailey. They also had visits from a few other coaches such as Garvin Nedd and female coach Subrina Munroe.At the closing ceremony, Director of Sport Christopher Jones urged the youngsters to take the knowledge gained and run with it as well as to continue training.He also noted that it is important for them to strike a balance between books and the field.However, he also pointed out that most importantly they should enjoy the sport they play, as they represent the future of Guyana.Jerimiah Kelvin was adjudged the Best Player-of-the-Academy.The sessions included classroom and field work which provided training to become cricketers, umpires, scorers, journalists and broadcasters.The Academy has produced Test players such as Ramnaresh Sarwan, Ryan Ramdass and Narsingh Deonarine, along with former USA captain Steve Massiah, who played two ODIs for the USA while Azeemul Haniff and Ricardo Mohamed played First-Class cricket.last_img read more