SETI: Search for Educational Targets Inc.

first_imgSETI may be the laughingstock of Congress, refused funding since William Proxmire gave it his Golden Fleece Award in the 1980s, but privately it is moving apace.  The Science Channel gave it prominence in its weekly report Friday, visiting with pioneering signaler and listener Frank Drake.  It surveyed everything from the first humble attempts to listen and broadcast, to the upcoming hardware and software that will increase the search capability exponentially.    For SETI Thursday on Space.com, Pamela Harman, SETI Education and Outreach Manager for the SETI Institute, detailed the many ways her organization is teaching the young about SETI and all its ancillary subjects.  In particular, the SETI Institute and its like-minded organizations are teaching teachers how to provide the foundation for SETI thinking, with courses like Understanding and Teaching Evolution, Extreme Life Forms on Earth and Elsewhere, Becoming Human: Hominid Evolution from Voyages Through Time, and Origins: The Questions in Life Science.  “Our astrobiology expertise is of great interest,” she said, “as the perpetual student lament ‘Why does this matter?’ can be answered.”  Her answer recalls Carl Sagan’s famous phrase.  “The response in all disciplines from astronomy and physics, to chemistry and biology is ‘We are star stuff!’”Speak for yourself, babe.  This oft-repeated line suggests a modification of the old distinction between stuff and junk.  Junk is the stuff natural selection throws away, and stuff is the junk natural selection keeps.    Aside from the fact that it is hard to envision any teenager getting excited over being told he or she is star stuff – unless they think their talent has finally been recognized – the reductionist, naturalistic philosophy inherent in this epigram betrays profound ignorance of western philosophy going back millennia.  Only recently have materialists gained ascendency in intellectual circles, and atheistic materialism permeates SETI through and through.  Their forefathers are Democritus, Lucretius and Epicurus, with few takers till John Locke and David Hume built their systems on sense experience alone.  Others dabbling with atheistic materialism were shunned or outmaneuvered with trenchant rational arguments by philosophers as varied as Thomas Aquinas, Rene Descartes, Thomas Reid, and Immanuel Kant.  Even most Enlightenment deists did not deny a rational design principle in the universe.  The early Newtonians and proponents of the mechanical philosophy were nearly all Christians to various degrees.  They never would have suggested that “star stuff” gave rise to the rational human soul.    Without even considering the long history of theological arguments for natural theology, great philosophers have long debunked atheism with finesse.  Thomas Reid and Kant, for example, undermined the empiricist viewpoints of the materialists from first principles.  They argued forcefully that such views are reductionist and self-refuting.  To even speak about observation and empiricism presupposes a rational power that is not reducible to sense experience.  In addition, nothing inherent in the physical mechanisms of the body can account for the operation the mind or grant its rational arguments legitimacy.  The same arguments can be wielded just as effectively today against the modern materialists.  Unfortunately, they rarely get a hearing.  Atheists routinely run amok in the science journals with tall tales about game theory producing human morals, DNA developing into souls, and collections of neurons generating the mind.  The peer review process fails to call them on the carpet for illogic or carelessness, and so they get away with it; why?  Because Darwin’s bulldogs succeeded long ago in gaining control of the scientific institutions and codifying their world view into the very definition of science.    SETI is part and parcel of a conspiracy to create a culture of materialists.  If it were not so, they would engage their critics and opponents in serious debate.  Instead, just like the astrobiologists and evolutionary psychologists, they shun scrutiny and usurp authority by co-opting the banner of “science” and conflating their materialism with the otherwise worthy goals of scientific research.  To a person, they idolize Father Charlie, because he liberated them from the need for both scientific and philosophical rigor.  Without apologies to Dawkins, Darwin made it possible to be an intellectually-foolfilled atheist.    Now that the Intelligent Design Movement has mounted the first volleys against the Darwinist naturalistic empire, the materialists are resorting to subterfuge instead of honorably engaging their opponents on the intellectual battlefield.  Pamela Harman has revealed that a huge educational program for the recruitment of young minds into philosophical materialism is underway: the Search for Educational Targets to Indoctrinate.  All that is necessary for foolishness to triumph is for good philosophers to think nothing.(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Militans, Army exchange fire in Bandipora

first_imgSecurity forces and militants exchanged fire briefly on Thursday night in north Kashmir’s Bandipora, the second such incident since the Centre declared to halt operations during Ramzan in Kashmir two days ago.Preliminary reports suggest the incident took place around 1:30 a.m. near Bonikhan Mohalla Hajin, Bandipora. A police official said the Army’s 13 Rashrtiya Rifles patrolling apparently “came under the fire”. The Army retaliated and the area was cordoned off later. No casualty was reported.The police and the Army issued no statement on the details of the firing incident.The incident took place a day after a civilian was killed by the militants in the area, said the police. The victim, Hilal Ahmad Parray from Bandipora’s Hajin, was abducted and killed in a plant nursery. “Three to four Pakistan-based militants assisted by a local militant Saleem Parray affiliated with the outlawed militant organization Lashkar-e-Taiba forcefully abducted Parray,” the police claimed.Since the start of the unilateral halting of operations against militants in J&K, three major incidents of militancy have occurred, which include an exchange of fire in Shopian on Wednesday afternoon and stealing of three weapons from a police post in Srinagar’s Dalgate area on Thursday evening.last_img read more

2009 X-Blades National Youth Championships preview

first_imgOver 1,500 players and spectators will converge on Port Macquarie for the four day event which showcases the top under 18’s talent in Australia. The championships have returned to the traditional Under 18’s format after the inclusion of the Under 20’s division in 2008, with 36 teams competing at the tournament.The event is Port Macquarie’s second national Touch Football tournament this year, after the National Touch League was hosted at the stadium in March.QSST’s Boys and Girls teams will both be looking to again take a clean sweep of the Under 18’s titles after their dominance at the 2008 championships, but will face tough competition from NSWCHS, NSWCCC, SQBD Sharks and Brisbane City Cobras in both divisions. Local hopes will be high after the Northern Eagles fifth placing in the Under 18’s Girls last year, and the experience of their coach – Australian Women’s 20’s player, Stephanie Halpin, will be of great benefit to the team. The Under 18’s Boys team will be looking to improve on their result of 14th at the 2008 championships with the help of the talent Port Macquarie brothers, Nick and Matt Bale. The round games will be played from Wednesday to Friday, before the semi finals and finals are played on Saturday. To keep updated on scores and news throughout the tournament, please visit the National Youth Championships website: http://www.nyc.mytouchfooty.comlast_img read more

Colorado jurys pot verdict may discourage similar cases

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO – A Colorado jury likely threw cold water on future legal challenges against cannabis companies by homeowners who consider filing racketeering lawsuits alleging proximity to pot operations hurts their property values, analysts and industry lawyers said Thursday.A federal jury in Denver on Wednesday rejected claims involving the odour from a pot farm made in a case that was closely watched by the marijuana industry.It was the first such lawsuit to reach a jury. Three others are pending in California, Massachusetts and Oregon.“The big takeaway is that the verdict is likely to curb the enthusiasm for bringing these lawsuits in the future,” Vanderbilt University law professor Rob Mikos said.He said it’s easy to show marijuana companies are violating federal laws against pot, but the Colorado verdict shows the difficulty In proving actual harm.“There was a thought that this would be easy money,” Mikos said about such claims.Congress created the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act — better known as RICO — to target the Mafia in the 1970s. It allowed prosecutors to argue that leaders of a criminal enterprise should pay a price along with lower-level defendants.The law also allows private parties to file lawsuits claiming their business or property has been damaged by a criminal enterprise. Those who can prove it can be financially compensated for damages plus attorneys’ expenses.Scott Schlager, a lawyer who filed a similar lawsuit against a Cambridge, Massachusetts, dispensary agreed with Mikos, saying racketeering lawsuits are expensive to litigate.“They shouldn’t be the next cottage industry,” he said. “There is a lot of uncertainty.”Schlager said the Denver verdict will have no effect on his case because the two legal actions have important differences.The Colorado plaintiffs complained that a farm’s odour lowered their property value by about $30,000.Schlager’s clients in Harvard Square argue that the stigma of a marijuana dispensary in the upscale business district lowered property values by $29 million.California attorney Ken Stratton, who represents a pot farmer being sued by eight homeowners near Petaluma, California, in the heart of wine country, said he was surprised the Denver case reached a jury.“I think we’ll see more and more of these knocked out before they go to trial,” Stratton said. “The racketeering law wasn’t meant to litigate land disputes.”He also predicted the Denver verdict will make other lawyers and disgruntled neighbours look elsewhere to settle their disputes with marijuana operations.He said showing that cannabis operations impact land prices is difficult, especially if the homeowners are speculating rather than arguing they lost money in actual sales.Emma Quinn-Judge, a Boston lawyer defending the Cambridge dispensary, agreed that showing harm is the biggest hurdle.“If you know anything about Cambridge home prices then you know that arguing their value has dropped $29 million is laughable,” she said.last_img read more

You Cant Opt Out Of Sharing Your Data Even If You Didnt

The Golden State Killer, who terrorized Californians from Sacramento to Orange County over the course of a decade, committed his last known murder in 1986, the same year that DNA profiling was used in a criminal investigation for the first time. In that early case, officers convinced thousands of men to voluntarily turn over blood samples, building a genetic dragnet to search for a killer in their midst. The murderer was eventually identified by his attempts to avoid giving up his DNA. In contrast, suspected Golden State Killer Joseph James DeAngelo, who was apprehended just last week, was found through other people’s DNA — samples taken from the crime scenes were matched to the profiles his distant relatives had uploaded to a publicly accessible genealogy website.You can see the rise of a modern privacy conundrum in the 32 years between the first DNA case and DeAngelo’s arrest. Digital privacy experts say that the way DeAngelo was found has implications reaching far beyond genetics, and the risks of exposure apply to everyone — not just alleged serial killers. We’re used to thinking about privacy breaches as what happens when we give data about ourselves to a third party, and that data is then stolen from or abused by that third party. It’s bad, sure. But we could have prevented it if we’d only made better choices.Increasingly, though, individuals need to worry about another kind of privacy violation. I think of it as a modern tweak on the tragedy of the commons — call it “privacy of the commons.” It’s what happens when one person’s voluntary disclosure of personal information exposes the personal information of others who had no say in the matter. Your choices didn’t cause the breach. Your choices can’t prevent it, either. Welcome to a world where you can’t opt out of sharing, even if you didn’t opt in.Yonatan Zunger, a former Google privacy engineer, noted we’ve known for a long time that one person’s personal information is never just their own to share. It’s the idea behind the old proverb, “Three may keep a secret if two of them are dead.” And as far back as the 1960s, said Jennifer Lynch, senior staff attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, phone companies could help law enforcement collect a list of all the numbers one phone line called and how long the calls lasted. The phone records may help convict a guilty party, but they also likely call police attention to the phone numbers, identities and habits of people who may not have anything to do with the crime being investigated.But the digital economy has changed things, making the privacy of the commons easier to exploit and creating stronger incentives to do so.“One of the fascinating things we’ve now walked ourselves into is that companies are valued by the market on the basis of how much user data they have,” said Daniel Kahn Gillmor, senior staff technologist with the ACLU’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project. A company can run along, not making a cent, but if it has a large user base and reams of private information about those users, then it’s valuable — and can be sold for millions. Companies that collect more data, keep that data, and use it to make connections between users are worth more. Sears, Roebuck and Co. may have been able to infer when you bought a gift from their catalog for a friend who lived in another town, but Amazon has more reason (and more ability) to use that information to build a profile of your friend’s interests.We all saw this in action in the recent Cambridge Analytica scandal. The privacy of the commons is how the 270,000 Facebook users who actually downloaded the “thisisyourdigitallife” app turned into as many as 87 million users whose data ended up in the hands of a political marketing firm. Much of the narrative surrounding that scandal has focused on what individuals should be doing to protect themselves. But that idea that privacy is all about your individual decisions is part of the problem, said Julie Cohen, a technology and law professor at Georgetown University. “There’s a lot of burden being put on individuals to have an understanding and mastery of something that’s so complex that it would be impossible for them to do what they need to do,” she said.Even if you do your searches from a specialized browser, tape over all your webcams and monitor your privacy settings without fail, your personal data has probably still been collected, stored and used in ways you didn’t intend — and don’t even know about.Companies can even build a profile of a person from birth based entirely on data-sharing choices made by others, said Salome Viljoen, a lawyer and fellow with the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard. Imagine new parents signing up for a loyalty card at their local pharmacy and then filling all of their child’s prescriptions there. The information collected every time they scan that loyalty card adds up to something like a medical history, which could later be sold to data brokers or combined with data bought from brokers to paint a fuller picture of a person who never consented to any of this.So does that mean that, in addition to locking down our own privacy choices, we need to police the choices of our friends and family? No, said Cohen, Gillmor and Viljoen. In fact, the privacy of the commons means that, in some cases, your data is collected in ways you cannot reasonably prevent, no matter how carefully you or anyone you know behaves.Take, for instance, Equifax, the credit-rating company that lost control of the data of 143 million people last year. Those people weren’t necessarily members of Equifax. Instead, the company collected data from other companies the people chose to do business with, and much of that business was stuff people can’t get by without, like renting or owning a home. Or, alternately, consider Facebook, again. That company has admitted it tracks the online behavior of people who never intentionally engage with it at all, thanks to partnerships with other websites. (Like many sites, FiveThirtyEight has this kind of partnership with Facebook. Our pages talk to the social network in several ways, including through ads and comments, and because of the embedded “Like” button.) If hounding every person you’ve ever cared about into adopting encryption tools like PGP sounded like fun, you’ll love living in a van down by the river with no internet access.1And I hope you’re prepared to buy the van with cash, because if you need credit, the credit check the dealer runs could hand your information to Equifax again.Instead, experts say these examples show that we need to think about online privacy less as a personal issue and more as a systemic one. Our digital commons is set up to encourage companies and governments to violate your privacy. If you live in a swamp and an alligator attacks you, do you blame yourself for being a slow swimmer? Or do you blame the swamp for forcing you to hang out with alligators?There isn’t yet a clear answer for what the U.S. should do. Almost all of our privacy law and policy is framed around the idea of privacy as a personal choice, Cohen said. The result: very little regulation addressing what data can be collected, how it should be protected, or what can be done with it. In some ways, Gillmor said, online privacy is where the environmental movement was back in the 1950s, when lots of big, centralized choices were hurting individuals’ health, and individuals had little power to change that. “I don’t even know if we have had our ‘Silent Spring’ yet,” he said. “Maybe Cambridge Analytica will be our ‘Silent Spring.’” read more

Troy Smith earns starting nod for 49ers

Former Ohio State Heisman trophy-winning quarterback Troy Smith will get the third start of his career — and his first since the 2007 season — when his San Francisco 49ers take on the Denver Broncos on Sunday in London. Cut by the Baltimore Ravens after the last day of training camp on Aug. 20, Smith was claimed off the waivers by San Francisco. He spent the team’s first seven games as the third-string quarterback. “The way that you prepare as a professional athlete, you have to be prepared when your number is called,” Smith told local media in San Francisco after practice Wednesday. “And that’s exactly where I’m at.” Smith faces the difficult task of turning around San Francisco’s 1-6 start. Starting quarterback Alex Smith separated his non-throwing shoulder when he was sacked in the third quarter of last Sunday’s 23-20 loss at Carolina. Backup David Carr took his place and threw a costly interception. “I think Troy Smith gives us a good opportunity to win this game,” coach Mike Singletary told media in a press conference Wednesday. “He’s been studying since we got here and he’s been getting with the coaches as much as he possibly could. He has enough of the offense to play.” Joining the 49ers this offseason, Smith reunited with former OSU and high school teammate Ted Ginn, who was acquired by the 49ers in an offseason trade with the Miami Dolphins. Ginn was one of Smith’s favorite targets in his 2006 Heisman campaign and was on the receiving end of nine of Smith’s 30 touchdown passes. “We just did so much together for so many years and had great success,” Ginn said. “He’s always been big brother and I’ve been little brother. It’s not really going to ever change, no matter how old we get.” Smith said he is prepared to play and knows that things can’t get worse for the struggling 49ers. “I think the easiest way to get through to your teammates is to show that you know exactly what your job is, what everyone expects of you and to go out there and execute,” Smith said. “We have a tremendous group of guys around us and we can do nothing but get better.” Smith has made two starts in his four-year NFL career. He took over for an injured Kyle Boller and went 1-1 in the last two games of the 2007 season. In those contests, he completed 32 of 60 passes, throwing for two touchdowns and no interceptions. Singletary hopes Smith can bring some stability to a 49ers team that has been viewed as a disappointment in the shaky NFC West. “The No. 1 thing I like about him … is leadership,” Singletary said. “That is his ability to get everybody on the same page.” Although Ginn is excited to join his Buckeye counterpart in the huddle, he said that it will take time for Smith to shake off the rust. “It’ll take some time,” Ginn told Comcast Sportsnet Bay Area. “We can’t expect him to go in and be a Tom Brady. We just want him to go in and be Troy Smith, enjoy his time and make a difference.” read more

Highscoring Buckeye womens basketball looks to improve on 500 start against Winthrop

Junior guard Ameryst Alston (14) attempts a layup during a game against Pittsburgh on Dec. 3 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU lost, 78-74.Credit: James Grega, Jr. / Asst. sports editorDespite boasting two of the top scorers in the nation, the Ohio State women’s basketball has as many losses as wins heading into a matchup with the Winthrop Eagles.The Buckeyes are 4-4 for the season after losing 78-74 at home against Pittsburgh. Coach Kevin McGuff said the team still has work to do on defense as it moves forward in the season.“We’re just not good enough defensively,” McGuff said. “We have to get better on the floor for us to make progress.”Junior guard Cait Craft shared the same sentiment as McGuff and said a lack of solid defense throughout games has been a weakness for OSU.“We don’t play defense like we want to win,” Craft said. “We’ve proved we can score the basketball, but if you can’t defend, it doesn’t matter who you play, you’re always going to be vulnerable.”Craft added that she and junior guard Ameryst Alston have tried to take on roles of leadership this season. One thing the pair has tried to instill within the young team is a sense of confidence on the court.“It’s more frustrating than anything because we know we’re capable,” Craft said. “We could beat anybody we’ve played so far and we just have been losing to teams just basically off pride.”Freshman guard Kelsey Mitchell continues to be on top of the Buckeyes on offense, as she leads the team in scoring, averaging 26.3 points per game, and leads OSU in field goal attempts per contest at 22.1. McGuff said he realizes how much work Mitchell does, but added that she feels comfortable in that role.“I’m asking a lot of Kelsey but Kelsey wants a lot to be asked of her,” McGuff said. “There’s a lot being asked of her and we need her and she knows that.”Mitchell ranks fourth in the nation in scoring while Alston comes in at 13th, averaging 23 points per game. Pittsburgh coach Suzie McConnell-Serio said after the OSU game that the combination of Alston and Mitchell can create problems for opposing defenses.“Watching Kelsey Mitchell get to the rim with the ease in every game she has played was amazing,” McConnell-Serio said. “Alston is one of the craftiest guards I’ve ever seen — the two of them are so dangerous with the ball in their hands.”Freshman forward Alexa Hart is expected to have an impact defensively for the Buckeyes as well. Hart leads OSU in rebounding and blocked shots, averaging 8.5 and four respectively per contest. McGuff said there are plans to use Hart more as she continues to improve.“I think she continues to get better,” McGuff said. “We’re going to ask a lot more of her because we need more out of her. I think the more we ask of her then the quicker she’s going to get where we need her.”The Buckeyes could enter the game against the Eagles without redshirt-sophomore forward Kalpana Beach. McGuff said Beach is still being monitored following a leg injury suffered in last week’s Paradise Jam tournament, but added that there is chance she could see playing time.“I think it’s a possibility for Sunday,” McGuff said. “If not that one then good chance the one after that, but she would be day-to-day at this point.”Beach missed the past two seasons with ACL injuries.OSU is scheduled to play Winthrop (S.C.) on Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

Mens hockey Mason Jobst named firstteam four other Buckeyes receive B1G honors

OSU sophomore forward Mason Jobst (26) tries to get past Michigan State redshirt freshman defender Jerad Rosburg (57) in a game on March 3 at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus, Ohio. Credit: Kevin Stankiewicz | Lantern photographerFive members of the 13th-ranked Ohio State men’s hockey team received Big Ten honors on Monday.Sophomore forward Mason Jobst was named to the All-Big Ten first team and recognized as the conference’s scoring co-champion with Minnesota sophomore forward Tyler Sheehy, racking up 34 points in conference play. Sheehy won Big Ten Player of the Year.Jobst had 13 goals and 21 assists in league play, and collected 51 points on 18 goals and 33 assists in the regular season.A trio of seniors were named to the All-Big Ten second team — goaltender Christian Frey, defenseman Josh Healey and forward captain Nick Schilkey.Sophomore forward Dakota Joshua was an honorable mention selection, scoring a career-high 11 goals and 22 assists, including nine goals and 11 assists coming in Big Ten play.On Saturday at Wisconsin, Jobst scored a goal and had an assist to surpass the 50-point barrier for the first time since R.J. Umberger had 53 points in 2003.Jobst ranks ninth in the NCAA in points per game (1.42), but leads the nation in the category since the start of the second half of the year (1.67).Following first-team honors in 2016, Healey earned his way onto the second-team all-conference with 24 points on four goals and 20 assists. His plus-18 rating is third among blue-liners in the conference and ranks eighth nationally at his position.Schilkey was the do-it-all player for the Buckeyes in the regular season. The senior from Marysville, Michigan, led the Big Ten with 26 goals and ranks second in the NCAA with .81 goals per game. The 26 goals are the highest single-season total for one player in the program since 1997. He had 39 points in the regular season, 18 of which came against Big Ten opponents.Frey ended the season with a .916 save percentage in conference games and a .910 save percentage in the regular season. Frey was injured for part of the season, and shared playing time with fellow senior goaltender Matt Tomkins. Frey was 9-7-3 with one shutout this season.Senior goaltender Logan Davis received one of six Big Ten sportsmanship awards.OSU plays in the Big Ten quarterfinals against Michigan State in Detroit at Joe Louis Arena on Thursday at 4:30 p.m. read more

Florin Andone enjoying life at Brighton

first_imgBrighton & Hove Albion striker Florin Andone was buzzing after scoring his third goal for the club in their 3-1 win at Bournemouth on Saturday.Andone scored Brighton’s third goal in their 3-1 victory at the Vitality Stadium on Saturday as the Seagulls advanced to the fourth round of the Emirates FA Cup.“It’s my style and I live for those moments, I’m very happy because it will give me confidence as a striker to score,” he told the club’s website.“I feel a real connection with the fans, I think they love me, that’s the feeling I get, and I want to thank them for all their support and encouragement to the team.“The win is good for us and it was important for a lot of the squad to get good game time this afternoon.Pep Guardiola: “Aymeric Laporte’s injury doesn’t look good” Andrew Smyth – August 31, 2019 Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola admits Aymeric Laporte’s injury “does not look good” and fears the defender will be out for a long time.“We played very well and deserved the victory, the feeling when I scored was crazy – sometimes you lose yourself in the moment after getting a goal and that’s what happened.“We’re in good form in the league and won today, this is the way to continue.“For me personally, I work hard every day in training in a very competitive squad – both I and Glenn [Murray] push one another and get on really well.“Our relationship is great – he’s a really good guy, this is the way we must continue – the group is very close and strong. It doesn’t matter who is playing and who isn’t, because the team is very competitive.”last_img read more

Man wanted in connection with random stabbing attack in Hillcrest

first_img KUSI Newsroom, April 11, 2018 Posted: April 11, 2018 Man wanted in connection with random stabbing attack in Hillcrest KUSI Newsroom SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Authorities reached out to the public Wednesday for help in identifying a man believed responsible for an apparently random stabbing attack that left a pedestrian severely wounded in Hillcrest last weekend.The suspect, a thin Latino who appeared to be in his mid-20s to mid-30s, was seen walking around in the area of Essex and Richmond streets in San Diego for about a half-hour early Sunday evening, seemingly looking for someone to fight, according to police.He eventually threw a rock at a 51-year-old pedestrian and walked off, but returned short time later and attacked the same victim with a knife, stabbing him in the head and neck, police said. The assailant then fled to the west.Medics took the victim to a trauma center for treatment of severe wounds. The man, who remained hospitalized this morning, is expected to survive.A surveillance camera near the scene of the attack captured images of the suspected attacker.Anyone with information about the case is asked to call San Diego County Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477 or contact the agency online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Tipsters may remain anonymous and could be eligible for a reward of up to $1,000. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more