Students and faculty discuss Latinos in higher education

first_imgSaint Mary’s “Week of Poder,” hosted by La Fuerza and the Student Diversity Board, kicked off this Monday with a discussion about different experiences speakers had while pursuing higher education as a Latino or mentoring Latinos in higher education.Leonard Sanchez, professional specialist in social work; Marc Belanger, chair and associate professor of political science; and Ty West, associate professor of modern languages, spoke at the event. Other speakers included Saint Mary’s international student and scholar advisor Adriana Petty, Saint Mary’s 2015 alumna Christin Kloski and the associate director of the TRiO Upward Bound program through Notre Dame, Rafael Marin.During the talk, several speakers brought up issues they experienced while pursuing higher education.Sanchez said in college he had to talk with the head advisor in order to be put in the classes he needed to graduate and had a conversation with the president of his alma mater about diversity on campus.“You have to believe that we’re going to graduate and that it’s an attainable event,” Sanchez said in regards to the conversation he had with the president of his alma mater. “You shouldn’t look at us and say, ‘You are so lucky or blessed to be here.’ I know that I am blessed, but you have to give us the same chance to succeed.”Marin said he was born in Texas and then moved back to Mexico with his mother when he was young. He moved to America for high school and had to learn the language quickly.“I had to work two or three times as hard as any other students in college,” he said. “Other students who did not have the language barrier have other challenges. We all face challenges that are different from one student to the next, minority or not.”Marin said he was often teased for his accent in high school and college.“Stereotypes create false images of not just Latinos, but many different ethnic groups,” Marin said. “It is your job to change the stereotypes.”It is important to focus on higher education., Kloski said.“One of the stereotypes is that [Latinas] are under-educated,” she said. “Well, look, we’re all here and proving them wrong. Focus on your education and be proud when you succeed.”Sanchez explained how he grew up in Portland and was the first generation in his family to attain a college degree. He said his decision to attend college was inspired by the Holy Cross Order.“The Holy Cross Order had a program where graduates from college would volunteer for a year in my community,” he said. “These young people were the first to mentor me and took me under their wing from when I was in third grade to college. Without them, I wouldn’t have known all it took to apply to colleges.”Petty said she went to high school in South Bend and was the first generation to attend college. Mentors were essential during her time on campus, she said.“I got involved in La Fuerza and the older girls really mentored me,” she said.“They helped me navigate around campus life and issues in the classroom.”Belanger discussed how important it is for Saint Mary’s students to build relationships with faculty.“Professors will write you a letter for grad school and and they won’t just say you did a good job in class — they will write about whole person,” he said. “Professors here do care about you. Be confident that if you’re here, you belong here.”West explained how he uses his time spent in Mexico as a tool to connect with Saint Mary’s students.“I try to bring the real world into the classroom and use concrete examples from the Latin American civilization to foster respect, knowledge and break down stereotypes and barriers we all confront,” West said.Sanchez said working at Saint Mary’s has been beneficial towards his goal of giving back to the community and giving others the opportunity to succeed at higher education.“When I came to Saint Mary’s, it was another opportunity to give back,” he said. “I am in a better place for what I want to accomplish.”Kloski said she was proud of the leader she was able to become while at Saint Mary’s.“Be strong and bold,” she said. “Set goals for yourself and become successful.”Tags: Diversity, latinos, panel, saint mary’s, Week of Poderlast_img read more

Cooperation Between SOUTHCOM and Partner Nations Spurred Response to Haiti Earthquake

first_img“In fact my wife and three children were killed in the earthquake,” the police chief told Lt. Gen. Keen. Programs like the one at the IADC, the current class of which includes 63 military and security scholars from 14 nations, provide armed forces officials from different countries with opportunities to learn together and build relationships. “I believe what success we enjoyed in Haiti, at the tactical level and some at the operational level, was really because of venues like this, because of relationships that are developed in classrooms like this,” Lt. Gen. Keen said. Speaking to IADC students and guests, Lt. Gen. Peixoto said the rules for military personnel operating on a relief mission in a foreign country are very clear and based on international accords. However, the urgency of the situation called for flexibility to speed up the flow of relief efforts to Haitian quake survivors. “Although there was an agreement signed by the United States ambassador and the head of the mission, we didn’t think about that too much,” Lt. Gen. Peixoto said. “The partnership we established was structured on our long-time friendship.” Managing the arrival of large quantities of relief supplies and workers, and matching it with the flood of requests for assistance, was a major challenge. “There was no coordination in the first two weeks, and we Military [personnel] were so upset.” Military coordination of relief activities Military coordination of relief activities “I believe what success we enjoyed in Haiti, at the tactical level and some at the operational level, was really because of venues like this, because of relationships that are developed in classrooms like this,” Lt. Gen. Keen said. Military friendships facilitate swift humanitarian response Natural disasters affect an entire population, including members of the very security forces who are needed for the recovery effort. In response to the terrible losses Haiti suffered in a matter of minutes, the International Community and representatives from 55 countries participating in the United Nations peace keeping mission’s police and military components quickly mobilized to provide aid and prevent additional loss of life. But he noted Haiti’s various security forces still face an uphill climb to organize internally and conduct joint training exercises needed to prove the nation’s operational readiness. “It takes leadership to step forward,” Lt. Gen. Keen said. “In Haiti it wasn’t about getting credit for anything that was being done, it was about how we work together to make a difference.” The international response to the earthquake in Haiti was the subject of the Complex Emergencies and Large Scale Disasters seminar held from January 27-29 at the Inter-American Defense College at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. Managing the arrival of large quantities of relief supplies and workers, and matching it with the flood of requests for assistance, was a major challenge. In response to the terrible losses Haiti suffered in a matter of minutes, the International Community and representatives from 55 countries participating in the United Nations peace keeping mission’s police and military components quickly mobilized to provide aid and prevent additional loss of life. SOUTHCOM established U.S. Joint Task Force-Haiti (JTF-Haiti) to spearhead Operation Unified Response in response to the humanitarian crisis and leveraged from existing relationships already built in Haiti to be successful. “Our personal relationships really affected how we were able to quickly work together in Haiti,” said retired U.S. Army Lieutenant General Ken Keen, who headed the JTF-Haiti, was deputy commander of SOUTHCOM, and was in Haiti during the earthquake. “We were able to acknowledge in this case that what we were trying to do was save lives and mitigate suffering among the Haitian people.” He relied extensively on his friendship with the then Force Commander of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), retired Brazilian Army Lieutenant General Floriano Peixoto, with whom he had participated in years of cooperative military exchanges between Brazil and the United States. Both Lt. Gen. Keen and Lt. Gen. Peixoto recalled the international response in Haiti during the seminar, where they led a panel on the response effort. The importance of friendship among Military officials Haitian police forces played a key role responding to the earthquake by helping international Military personnel assess the situation, Lt. Gen. Keen said. “We have groups everywhere to train people,” Justin said. “With foreign partners, we need that SOUTHCOM help in terms of practice and exercise.” To bring order to the chaos, Lt. Gen. Peixoto and his staff developed a central hub to channel all relief activities, which included staff from each major partner agency. The structure was called the Joint Operations Tasking Center and became a model that U.N. officials sought to replicate for other major responses in other parts of the world. As the head of U.S. forces under JTF-Haiti, Lt. Gen. Keen faced his own challenges in balancing responsibilities to two different civilian authorities – the U.S. ambassador in Haiti, and the head of the nation’s chief relief agency, the U.S. Agency for International Development. Lt. Gen. Peixoto is a special consultant for the UN in its High Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations and Special Political Missions. We want the newspaper the way it was before. Not like it is today I support them helping Anti to fix the houses damaged by the earthquake Crime doesn’t pay. It’s very sad to see families destroyed because of crime. Congratulations, a very good way to show how our Armed Forces perform to benefit the community and the development of the population all over Latin America. I would like to have this information always. Excellent website thank you I think this is very good The international response to the earthquake in Haiti was the subject of the Complex Emergencies and Large Scale Disasters seminar held from January 27-29 at the Inter-American Defense College at Fort McNair in Washington, D.C. “When a natural disaster occurs, we all work together to put a country back together,” said Rear Admiral Martha Herb, director of IADC, at the start of the three-day seminar. Military friendships facilitate swift humanitarian response Both Lt. Gen. Keen and Lt. Gen. Peixoto recalled the international response in Haiti during the seminar, where they led a panel on the response effort. “There was no coordination in the first two weeks, and we Military [personnel] were so upset.” “We developed capabilities that can be used for future quakes and other events,” Lt. Gen. Peixoto said. “It was a great opportunity to show that two different entities could be put together and give the world a great example of partnership.” “Although there was an agreement signed by the United States ambassador and the head of the mission, we didn’t think about that too much,” Lt. Gen. Peixoto said. “The partnership we established was structured on our long-time friendship.” center_img SOUTHCOM established U.S. Joint Task Force-Haiti (JTF-Haiti) to spearhead Operation Unified Response in response to the humanitarian crisis and leveraged from existing relationships already built in Haiti to be successful. The response helped guide Lt. Gen. Keen’s actions in a way that would respect political sensibilities in certain cases, while granting him more autonomy in other cases, to speed relief efforts to those most in need. “We did not prescribe anything without getting Haitian input,” Lt. Gen. Peixoto said. Both Military officers recognized that, while their orders often came from civilian authorities above them, the needs and requests of the Haitian people came first. During the seminar, several IADC students from Haiti listened closely to the discussion on lessons from the international response and ways to improve efforts in the future. To bring order to the chaos, Lt. Gen. Peixoto and his staff developed a central hub to channel all relief activities, which included staff from each major partner agency. The structure was called the Joint Operations Tasking Center and became a model that U.N. officials sought to replicate for other major responses in other parts of the world. “We developed capabilities that can be used for future quakes and other events,” Lt. Gen. Peixoto said. “It was a great opportunity to show that two different entities could be put together and give the world a great example of partnership.” As the head of U.S. forces under JTF-Haiti, Lt. Gen. Keen faced his own challenges in balancing responsibilities to two different civilian authorities – the U.S. ambassador in Haiti, and the head of the nation’s chief relief agency, the U.S. Agency for International Development. “My question to them was: what authority do I have to interface with Haitian locals?” Lt. Gen. Keen said. The response helped guide Lt. Gen. Keen’s actions in a way that would respect political sensibilities in certain cases, while granting him more autonomy in other cases, to speed relief efforts to those most in need. Both Military officers recognized that, while their orders often came from civilian authorities above them, the needs and requests of the Haitian people came first. “We did not prescribe anything without getting Haitian input,” Lt. Gen. Peixoto said. During the seminar, several IADC students from Haiti listened closely to the discussion on lessons from the international response and ways to improve efforts in the future. Marc Justin, senior commissioner with Haiti’s National Police, said he feels the Caribbean nation is better prepared now to handle a natural disaster than it was in 2010, in part thanks to cooperation with foreign partners, like SOUTHCOM. “We have groups everywhere to train people,” Justin said. “With foreign partners, we need that SOUTHCOM help in terms of practice and exercise.” But he noted Haiti’s various security forces still face an uphill climb to organize internally and conduct joint training exercises needed to prove the nation’s operational readiness. “If we never train together, and we are not ready, it will be a fiasco,” Justin said. Haitian police forces played a key role responding to the earthquake by helping international Military personnel assess the situation, Lt. Gen. Keen said. He especially praised the efforts of the police chief in the Cité Soleil area, who lost dozens of officers in the quake. “In fact my wife and three children were killed in the earthquake,” the police chief told Lt. Gen. Keen. Natural disasters affect an entire population, including members of the very security forces who are needed for the recovery effort. “It takes leadership to step forward,” Lt. Gen. Keen said. “In Haiti it wasn’t about getting credit for anything that was being done, it was about how we work together to make a difference.” Lt. Gen. Keen currently serves as Associate Dean of Leadership Development for Emory University’s Goizueta School of Business in Atlanta, Georgia. Lt. Gen. Peixoto is a special consultant for the UN in its High Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations and Special Political Missions. “My question to them was: what authority do I have to interface with Haitian locals?” Lt. Gen. Keen said. “We were able to acknowledge in this case that what we were trying to do was save lives and mitigate suffering among the Haitian people.” Marc Justin, senior commissioner with Haiti’s National Police, said he feels the Caribbean nation is better prepared now to handle a natural disaster than it was in 2010, in part thanks to cooperation with foreign partners, like SOUTHCOM. By Dialogo February 05, 2015 Speaking to IADC students and guests, Lt. Gen. Peixoto said the rules for military personnel operating on a relief mission in a foreign country are very clear and based on international accords. However, the urgency of the situation called for flexibility to speed up the flow of relief efforts to Haitian quake survivors. The importance of friendship among Military officials Programs like the one at the IADC, the current class of which includes 63 military and security scholars from 14 nations, provide armed forces officials from different countries with opportunities to learn together and build relationships. He relied extensively on his friendship with the then Force Commander of the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), retired Brazilian Army Lieutenant General Floriano Peixoto, with whom he had participated in years of cooperative military exchanges between Brazil and the United States. Lt. Gen. Keen currently serves as Associate Dean of Leadership Development for Emory University’s Goizueta School of Business in Atlanta, Georgia. “When a natural disaster occurs, we all work together to put a country back together,” said Rear Admiral Martha Herb, director of IADC, at the start of the three-day seminar. “Our personal relationships really affected how we were able to quickly work together in Haiti,” said retired U.S. Army Lieutenant General Ken Keen, who headed the JTF-Haiti, was deputy commander of SOUTHCOM, and was in Haiti during the earthquake. He especially praised the efforts of the police chief in the Cité Soleil area, who lost dozens of officers in the quake. “If we never train together, and we are not ready, it will be a fiasco,” Justin said. last_img read more

Your need to control is killing your team

first_imgWhen I was a young CEO, my biggest fear was disappointing those who believed in me. So, I compensated by working crazy hours and overseeing every single minute detail of my company. It didn’t take long for me to see the red flags of my actions: I was burnt out, my team was unhappy, and employees were quitting at an alarming rate. I wasn’t micromanaging because I had cruel intentions; I was simply afraid of failing.Often for a business leader, what typically starts as a well-intentioned push for excellence can quickly turn into a management nightmare where insecurity and fear of failure take control.In order to ensure their teams deliver the quality levels they demand, leaders will insist everything earns their stamp of approval before seeing the light of day. But as teams grow larger and larger, this amount of micromanaging will simply choke the life out of their budding businesses.The founder of one of the largest ad agencies in the U.S., Jordan Zimmerman, recently told Entrepreneur that a company led by a micromanager will never become a large, thriving powerhouse. Leaders need to learn how to let go, and that’s only possible once they build trust with their teams. continue reading » 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more