Members of OSU’s 2016 Class Who Could Contribute As Freshmen

first_imgIf Mike Gundy had his way, it would likely be his preference to have every freshman redshirt and sit on the sidelines to soak up the system and get to a playing weight that will make them competitive as sophomores. But Mike Gundy doesn’t always get what he wants. In 2015, he gave true freshmen Jalen McCleskey, Kenneth McGruder, Jeff Carr and Sugar Loaf Daniels ample playing time. Partly because of their phenomenal talents, and partly due to depth issues at their respective positions.The 2016 season returns more experience and more depth at some of those positions, but there is still a chance that some true freshmen could break onto the scene for a team that could be loaded up for a Big 12 title run. Here’s a look at some of the members of the 2016 recruiting class who could break onto the scene as freshmen.Tramonda Moore – Offensive TackleMoore was a last second welcome addition to the class, who could be a big-time contributor early on in Stillwater. There have been reports questioning his eligibility status and suggesting he may go the junior college route, but Mike Gundy says he’s on track to be on campus later in the summer. 6-6, 350-pounds to add to the offensive line? Freshman or not, that’s a big body who could play early.Tyrell Alexander – Wide ReceiverOklahoma State’s persistence with Alexander paid big dividends for the Pokes. After losing his commitment once in 2015, they nearly lost him to Arkansas just days before signing day. Now that he’s official, they can relish in the fact they will be bringing in one of the more underrated prospects in Texas. His 6-3 frame and freaky athleticism will earn rave reviews, despite his lack of experience at the position in high school. Even with the experience coming in next year, he’ll figure to mold some sort of role in the offense next year.Calvin Bundage – LinebackerLike Moore, Bundage was another last second addition who chose the Pokes over Oregon, Arizona, and others. The linebacker position may be a difficult position for a true freshman to play in, but with mainstay’s Ryan Simmons and Seth Jacobs moving on, he has a chance to join Jordan Burton and Devante Averette in the dynamic star position. He’s that good.Madre Harper – CornerbackHarper is almost a sure-fire bet to see the field the most out of the bunch. An early enrollee from Lamar High School, he has the tools and the size to potentially lock down a backup spot at cornerback. With the lack of depth returning next year, it may be a committee approach at cornerback at Harper figures into being a vital figure.Tyler Brown – Offensive guardBrown was one of several big in-state gets for the Cowboys this cycle from Lexington, OK, who they stole from TCU’s clutches last year. He is a 6-5, 330-pound guard who says the coaches expect him to compete for playing time right away. He’s a mean offensive guard – and one of the biggest needs is some big nasties in the middle. I like his chances. If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more

Three party leaders campaign in British Columbia Scheer tours Quebec

first_imgOTTAWA — British Columbia is getting attention from three federal party leaders today, including the promise of a “new deal” from the NDP’s Jagmeet Singh.Singh has already promised to cede authority in several areas to Quebec, including on the environment, immigration and justice, as part of his vision for more asymmetric federalism, in which the provinces don’t all have the same relationship with the federal government.Singh is also to meet with Vancouver Mayor Kennedy Stewart, the former NDP MP whose old seat Singh now holds.Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau is starting his day in Delta, B.C., where he’s expected to make another announcement on the environment before flying back east to a rally in Thunder Bay, Ont.And People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier begins a western tour, his first extended trip of the campaign, with an appearance at the Surrey, B.C., board of trade.Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer is campaigning in Quebec and Green Leader Elizabeth May is to reveal the financials behind her party’s platform in Halifax.Trudeau has been trying hard to paint Scheer as backward on environmental issues, especially climate change, by tying him and his opposition to the Liberals’ carbon-pricing policy to unpopular Ontario Premier Doug Ford.He hopes a string of environment-related promises will help draw back some of the support that got shaky after last week’s revelations of his history dressing up in black- and brownface.Singh made climate-change promises of his own Tuesday, including pledging to electrify Canada’s public-transit fleets by the end of the next decade and to construct a coast-to-coast clean-energy corridor.Trudeau’s climate-change policies are hypocritical, the NDP said, considering the $4.5-billion the government spent to buy the Trans Mountain oil-pipeline project.Trudeau and Singh did speak late Tuesday about the times Trudeau darkened his skin for costumes, but neither camp would say just what they talked about.Scheer, meanwhile, has mostly been playing his own game in central Canada, talking about undoing Liberal changes to the tax treatment small corporations get and eliminating regulations.This report by The Canadian Press was first published Sept. 25, 2019.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Jimmy Carter Supports WhistleBlower Edward Snowden

first_imgJimmy Carter is giving his support to whistle-blower Edward Snowden.“[Edward Snowden] has obviously violated the laws of America, for which he is responsible, but I think the invasion of human rights and American privacy has gone too far,” former US president Jimmy Carter told CNN. “I think that the secrecy that has been surrounding this invasion of privacy has been excessive, so I think that the bringing of it to the public notice has probably been, in the long term, beneficial. I think the American people deserve to know what their Congress is doing.”His views on invasion of privacy echoed the New York Times op-ed that he wrote a year prior, criticizing the US’s human rights abuses: “Revelations that top officials are targeting people to be assassinated abroad, including American citizens, are only the most recent, disturbing proof of how far our nation’s violation of human rights has extended. […]“In addition to American citizens’ being targeted for assassination or indefinite detention, recent laws have canceled the restraints in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 to allow unprecedented violations of our rights to privacy through warrantless wiretapping and government mining of our electronic communications. […]“As concerned citizens, we must persuade Washington to reverse course and regain moral leadership according to international human rights norms that we had officially adopted as our own and cherished throughout the years.”Copyright ©2013Look to the Starslast_img read more

Aboriginal Affairs paternalistic selfserving in its use of takeitorleaveit offers

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Specific Claims Tribunal blasted a branch of Aboriginal Affairs for being “paternalistic, self-serving, arbitrary and disrespectful” in a recent ruling impacting the department’s “take-it-or-leave-it” gambit to settle historical claims with First Nations.The Jan. 17 ruling by Judge Patrick Smith eviscerated Aboriginal Affairs’ specific claims branch for its handling of a claim filed by the Aundeck Omni Kaning (AOK) First Nation, which is on Manitoulin Island, and its attempt to block it from accessing the tribunal.Smith said the ruling could have “significant relevance to many other claims” where Canada has put deadlines on settlements for “small value claims.”Under the tribunal’s rules, a band can submit a claim if the department hasn’t made a decision on whether to negotiate a claim three years from the day it was originally filed with Ottawa.A band can also submit a claim before the three years pass if the department indicates it won’t negotiate a settlement.The department has issued numerous take-it-or-leave it settlements to bands across the country seeking compensation for historical grievances around the mismanagement of trust funds and the loss of lands.AOK was seeking access to the tribunal arguing the department was not willing to negotiate a settlement claim which centered on the 1914 payment of $559.63 from the band’s trust fund. The money went to the children of a former band member named George Abotossaway, also known as George Thompson, who gave up his status under a process called enfranchisement in 1909.The band, which was known as the Ojibways of Sucker Cree at the time, obtained confirmation from Aboriginal Affairs deputy minister Patrick Borbey on Nov. 12, 2011, that the payment of the money “was not authorized by law, and thus Canada breached its fiduciary duty.” The money was paid to Abotossaway’s children after he gave up his status.A few months later, Brendan Blom, the assistant negotiator in the specific claims branch, sent a letter dated March 28, 2012, to Chief Patsy Corbier informing the band that the department was offering a take-it-or-leave it offer that was based on a predetermined formula.The formula calculated the owed amount by applying the Consumer Price Index to 80 per cent of the total and adding compound interest at Aboriginal Affairs trust fund rates to 20 per cent of the amount. The actual dollar figure is redacted from the documents filed with the tribunal.Blom’s letter also gave the band 90 days to accept or the department would close the file.The department argued that its take-it-or-leave-it settlement letter to AOK constituted a form of open negotiations putting the claim outside the tribunal’s jurisdiction.  The department argued that the Aboriginal Affairs Minister had “considerable discretion in deciding when to accept, negotiate or not negotiate a claim.”Smith ruled that the department’s position outlined in the settlement letter effectively gave notice to the First Nation that the claim wouldn’t be negotiated.“In deciding to employ a small value claim process in making an offer to settle without discussion, in refusing to discuss or explain the offer, and in imposing a 90 day deadline and then closing the file, Canada, and specifically the minister, effectively decided and notified the claimant that it would not negotiate the claim,” said Smith in his ruling.Smith said the department’s actions fell short of upholding the “honour” of the Crown.“This position, along with the process employed by the specific claims branch for small value claims in relation to this claim, and perhaps many others, is, frankly, paternalistic, self-serving, arbitrary and disrespectful of First Nations,” said Smith. “Such position affords no room for the principles of reconciliation, accommodation and consultation that the Supreme Court, in many decisions, has described as being the foundation of Canada’s relationship with First Nations.”Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt’s office said that the department is reviewing the tribunal’s decision before deciding what to do next. The tribunal’s decision could be put to the Federal Court for a judicial review.Magnetawan First Nation Chief William Diabo said his community, which sits along Ontario’s Hwy 69 near Georgian Bay, received a take-it-or-leave it offer from the department within the past month. Diabo said his claim centres on loss of reserve land through the construction of highways and a redrawing of the reserve’s boundaries.“That may give us another chance to take a kick at the can,” said Diabo.news@aptn.calast_img read more