TRANS-TASMAN CHALLENGE FOR VICTORIA

first_imgTrans-Tasman rivalry will reach fever pitch on Saturday 9 December 2006 at Elwood Park, Elwood, Victoria when a Victorian based “Australian” team take on a Victorian based “New Zealand” selection in the annual Victorian Touch Association (VTA) Trans-Tasman Challenge Trophy Series.The traditional Kiwi “Haka” will reverberate around the picturesque beachside suburb of Elwood whilst the “Aussie, Aussie, Aussie” chant is sure to get a run as the “Aussies” and the “Kiwis” square off in a series that will bring traditional Trans-Tasman rivalry to the boil.Three years ago the VTA Technical Panel instigated the Trans-Tasman Challenge Trophy Series to acknowledge the two traditional cultures who have dominated the local Victorian touch scene.The concept received a fantastic response from the local touch community and has grown each year to become a showcase event on the Victorian calendar.In a best-of-three game series, a Victorian based “Australian” team is selected to oppose a Victorian based “New Zealand” selection in Men’s Open and Women’s Open divisions.If the Series is deadlocked (3 games a piece) a deciding Mixed drop-off is played between the two teams to determine the overall Victorian Touch Association Trans-Tasman Challenge Trophy winner. The event also recognises a number of Victorian Touch Association members who have made significant contributions to the sport over the years including Michael Sparks, Miles Davine, Sete Kita, & Karen Jones.The respective Most Valuable Player awards for the teams are named in honour of these Victorian Touch Association stalwarts.Bragging rights for most series won in the event’s history is up for grabs this weekend, with Australia winning the Inaugural Series, and New Zealand squaring the ledger last time around, and both teams now eagerly awaiting the opportunity to claim supremacy in the 2006 Trans-Tasman Challenge.The “New Zealand” Men’s team will field a combination big on speed, agility, and attacking flair led by  Jason Kaiwai (2006 Crusaders Men’s Open),  Callan Donner (Victorian Men’s Open), and former New Zealand Secondary Schools representative Cam Tangaroa.  The “Australian” Men’s team will feature an experienced line-up headlined by Derrick Cant (former Crusaders Mixed & Mens Open), Michael Carter (Australian Senior Mixed, 2005 All Nations) and 17 year-old young gun Chris Katal who played in the Crusaders Men’s 20’s team at the 2006 National Touch League.The New Zealand Women’s Team also has a strong look about it.Former New Zealand Senior Mixed representative Terry Beazley has been handed the coaching reins of a team featuring  Teena TeMaro (New Zealand 2005 All Nations Women’s 35’s representative),Bernadette Diamond (former New Zealand Bay of Plenty representative), and current Victorian Open Mixed player Sophie Silbury. The “Australian” Women’s team will have its own star quality line-up spearheaded by Leah Percy (2006 Crusaders Womens Open), Wendy Briscoe (2006 Crusaders Womens Open) and 2005 Australian Senior Mixed 2005 All Nations representative Suzy Barrett.Australian Open Mixed Captain Tony Eltakchi will fly in from Sydney for the event as Tournament Ambassador and will be the Master of Ceremonies for the occasion.Junior players (Boys & Girls) will also take part in scheduled exhibition games on the day. These youngsters will take part in a training session in the morning and then play a 20-minute game showcasing the skills, teamwork, and standard of Victorian Junior Touch. For a great day of quality Touch football head down to Elwood Park Saturday to see a prelude to the Trans-Tasman rivalry that is sure to be amplified on the world stage at the 2007 Federation of International Touch World Cup 17-21 January in Stellenbosch, South Africa.Full results can accessed by going to the Victorian Touch web-site http//:www.victouch.com.aulast_img read more

Don’t Store Household Chemicals in Drink Bottles – CARPIN

first_img The Caribbean Poison Information Network (CARPIN) continues to implore persons to desist from storing household chemicals in drink bottles. The Caribbean Poison Information Network (CARPIN) continues to implore persons to desist from storing household chemicals in drink bottles.Speaking at a recent JIS Think Tank, Poison Information Coordinator, Sherika Whitelocke-Ballingsingh, said that despite a sustained public education campaign, particularly over the last 10 years, warning parents against storing chemicals in containers that look like food or drink products, the problem persists, contributing to cases of accidental poisoning among children.She noted that bleach is among the common agents to which children are being exposed.The Poison Information Coordinator was addressing a recent JIS Think Tank where she provided details of a University of Technology (UTech)-funded study, which looked on the use of chemicals within the home and how behaviour, knowledge, and storage pattern will determine how children, 0-5 years, are poisoned in Jamaica.The study was conducted among households in the parishes of St. Thomas, Kingston, St. Catherine and Westmoreland.Mrs. Whitelocke-Ballingsingh explained that the decision was taken “to do a qualitative study and get into the homes to speak to parents, look at their environment and to see what was happening in the homes that was contributing to the high rate of poisoning among children”.“From the Poison Centre’s perspective, we wanted to know more about what it is that is causing children to constantly be exposed to these chemicals even though there are public education programmes out there,” she added.She said that a common factor throughout 90 per cent of the homes was the containers in which the chemicals are being stored.“Many people in Jamaica buy particular types of chemicals in bottles that are inappropriate,” Mrs. Whitelocke-Ballingsingh pointed out, noting that this was found to occur across all socio-economic groups.“We have found that many persons purchase retail chemicals in gallon bottles that look like water bottles” she said, noting that this includes bleach, disinfectants and sanitisers.“Some of the chemicals are also infused with fruity flavours and are stored in bottles that look like they were made for syrup” she said. She noted that bleach is among the common agents to which children are being exposed. Speaking at a recent JIS Think Tank, Poison Information Coordinator, Sherika Whitelocke-Ballingsingh, said that despite a sustained public education campaign, particularly over the last 10 years, warning parents against storing chemicals in containers that look like food or drink products, the problem persists, contributing to cases of accidental poisoning among children. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Government to Consider Divestment of 10,500 Acres of Former Cane Lands

first_img It is expected that these lands will mostly attract large investors engaging in onion production, fruit tree orchards and exotic crops. Story Highlights The Government is to consider the divestment of 10,500 acres of former sugar-cane lands in St. Catherine, to be used for high-yielding, highly profitable production of non-sugar crops and livestock. This is according to Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, who informed that he is to receive a proposal from Sugar Company of Jamaica (SCJ) Holdings Limited this week for the rationalisation of these lands, which it owns. The Government is to consider the divestment of 10,500 acres of former sugar-cane lands in St. Catherine, to be used for high-yielding, highly profitable production of non-sugar crops and livestock.It is expected that these lands will mostly attract large investors engaging in onion production, fruit tree orchards and exotic crops.This is according to Minister of Industry, Commerce, Agriculture and Fisheries, Hon. Audley Shaw, who informed that he is to receive a proposal from Sugar Company of Jamaica (SCJ) Holdings Limited this week for the rationalisation of these lands, which it owns.Mr. Shaw, who was making his contribution to the 2018/19 Sectoral Debate in the House of Representatives on May 1, informed that this is part of the 18,000 hectares of land leased by Pan Caribbean Sugar Company, which has been returned to the Government.The lands were once home to the Bernard Lodge Estate, which focused on sugar-cane cultivation, operation of a rum distillery, and eventually ethanol production.The Agriculture Ministry negotiated the return of the lands last year as part of plans to promote greater utilisation of idle arable lands for agricultural production.“We cannot continue to watch good lands lay idle anymore… . These 18,000 hectares of highly fertile, alluvial, flat and mechanisable lands represent the largest contiguous area of lands in Jamaica, suitable and ideal for this agricultural revolution,” he said.Mr. Shaw informed that he has met with SCJ Holdings, Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO), the National Irrigation Commission and Agro-Investment Corporation, and has issued instructions for the Bernard Lodge Land Use Master Plan to be developed quickly. The plan will outline how the lands are to be utilised.Of the remaining 7,500 hectares of land to be left available for sugar production, 2,000 hectares of that will be developed as an urban community.last_img read more