Vermont Civil Rights Panel appointed

first_imgThe US Commission on Civil Rights has appointed 15 people to its Vermont State Advisory Committee.Kim Tolhurst, designated the authority of the staff director of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, announced the appointment of â ¢Francine T. Bazluke of Essex Junction, John H. Bloomer of Wallingford, Luther M. Brown of Rutland, Ellen Mercer Fallon of Middlebury, Leslie Ann Holman of Burlington, Terrance D. Martin of Brattleboro, Marion C. Milne of West Topsham, Cheryl W. Mitchell of New Haven, Tara O’Brien of Brattleboro, Eric D. Sakai of Randolph, Stephanie L. Sidortsova of Westford, Diane B. Snelling of Hinesburg, Tracey H. Tsugawa of Williston, and Stewart R. Wood of Quechee. The Commission appointed Diane Snelling as Chair. The appointments are for two years.Congress has directed the Commission to establish advisory committees in all states and the District of Columbia to assist in its fact-finding function. These committees receive reports, suggestions, and recommendations from individuals, public and private organizations, and public officials, and forward advice and recommendations to the Commission. Members of State Advisory Committees serve without compensation, conduct civil rights reviews and investigations, and report to the Commission.###last_img read more

Tornadoes, Fires, Floods: Are You Ready for a Disaster?

first_imgExperts say advance preparation can help people better respond to and recover from the impacts of a disaster or other emergency. Preparedness Month is a good time to make or update those plans. (Image: Jane M. Sawyer/morguefile.)INDIANAPOLIS – Tornadoes, fires, floods and other disasters can strike at almost any time, and during Preparedness Month, state leaders are reminding residents about the importance of being ready for an emergency.Households should gather supplies they would need in the event they find themselves without power, heat or clean running water, said John Erickson, senior public information officer for the Indiana Department of Homeland Security. It’s also wise, he said, to have a family plan of action that includes how to contact one another.“Whether that’s text-messaging, whether you are going to designate an out-of-state contact – because sometimes, long distance calls are easier to make, because local lines can be congested with 911 calls and other urgent phone calls,” he said.Important items for an emergency kit, Erickson said, include one gallon of drinking water per person per day, nonperishable foods that can last up to three days, flashlights, blankets and first-aid supplies.Erickson sais schools, businesses and community organizations also are encouraged to have contingency plans, so everyone is aware of what to do and where to go in order to stay safe.“They’re very important to help with situations where bad things happen,” he said, “and they’re going to help you react to those situations in the best way possible.”When talking to children about disasters, Erickson said focusing on safety can help them to feel better about the situation.“If they know how to get out of the house if there’s a fire, if they know where you’re going to meet, those things help them feel like they are helping the household, they are helping themselves,” he said. “They know what to do in those situations, and it gives them more confidence.”Preparing ahead of time, Erickson said, can help people better respond to, recover from and lessen the physical, emotional and financial impacts of a disaster or other emergency.Mary Kuhlmanlast_img read more