Turkuaz’s Mikey Carubba On How His Tribute To Tom Petty’s Music Became A Celebration Of His Life

first_imgWhen he’s not on tour with Turkuaz, drummer Michelangelo Carubba tends to keep busy by playing the music that he loves with his various talented friends. From his annual birthday super jam in Brooklyn, to his all-star tribute to Alanis Morissette‘s Jagged Little Pill benefitting Planned Parenthood, Carubba has established himself in the New York live music scene as a dedicated and passionate bandleader and organizer for a wide array of special performances.Turkuaz’s Michelangelo Carubba Hosts All-Star Birthday Bash [Full Audio/Photo]On November 17th, Carubba will return to American Beauty NYC for a tribute to the legendary Tom Petty featuring Turkuaz bandmates Dave Brandwein and Taylor Shell, Kung Fu keyboardist Beau Sasser, and Twiddle guitarist Mihali Savoulidis, and more. While the show had been on the books for weeks prior to Petty’s sudden passing earlier this month, the performance will now take on an added emotional weight as Carubba and company pay their respects to the fallen rock and roll icon.Below, you can read Michelangelo Carubba’s thoughts on performing the music of the late, great Tom Petty:When I booked this show in July with American Beauty, I had been on a Tom Petty kick for a month or so. My uncle Dave had given me ‘Full Moon Fever’ when I was about 6 or 7 years old, and that album changed my life. I played it non-stop for about a year. I didn’t know what it was then, but there was this appeal to his sound that just spoke to me.We were on tour last month, and I woke up to hearing my band members on the bus saying Tom Petty had suffered a heart attack and was on the verge. I was just so shocked. At the time, it didn’t compute that I even had this show to put on. I just didn’t want to lose another hero. Between 2016 and 2017, we lost a lot of legendary artists, but none of them really hit me that hard. I had what I considered a really close and personal relationship with Petty’s music. It’s sentimental to me. And as that day went on, it was confirmed that he had, in fact, passed on.Back in the summer, I had tapped my band mates Taylor Shell and Dave Brandwein to fill out the rhythm section for this show. We as Turkuaz have done special tribute sets for artists like The Talking Heads, Sly and the Family Stone, and Joe Cocker. I know Taylor and Dave always do their homework and respect the source material, and always do it justice. Knowing their personal styles as well, it was a no brainer.With all the keys work on Tom Petty’s stuff–between organ, Rhodes, and piano–my big bro Beau Sasser from Kung Fu was an obvious choice. Sasha Brown will be special guest guitarist with us, and Sasha is a damn gunslinger on the guitar, not to mention one of my best friends, so I was stoked when he was available too. Danny Mayer from Eric Krasno’s band was around that night as well, so he’s gonna play with us too.But when it came to who was going to be my Tom Petty, there was a day or two where I was kind of blanking. I knew I wanted someone who, at their artistic core, represented the same sort of values that I felt Tom had. A real story teller. Someone who could resonate with the universal message that Tom put out. Love, life, heartbreak, sadness, happiness, a sense of wonder, determination. Someone who won’t back down from living life, so to speak. Then a picture of Mihali Savoulidis popped up on my Instagram feed, and I just went, “Oh, he’s it.” I texted him right away. His response?“I have just the right hat for this occasion.”I couldn’t have been more excited to play this show when I booked it 3 months ago. His music means so much to me, as it does to the rest of the band. And now, with his sudden passing, it really turned into something special, where we could really take a look at this music, at Tom Petty’s entire body of work, and really get inside of it and play the living hell out it. Even better to do it with your best friends.Tickets for Michelangelo Carubba & Friends’ “Don’t Do Me Like That” Tom Petty tribute are moving quickly. Grab yours today and join in this emotional celebration of one of rock and roll’s greatest talents.***Tickets are available here***[Cover Photo by Capacity Images]last_img read more

Students share immigration stories

first_imgLa Fuerza, the Saint Mary’s club that represents Latina culture, hosted Immigration Monologues Thursday as a part of Action Week. Club president Cristina Posadas began the lecture by addressing six myths commonly associated with immigrants.She said the myths are that immigrants do not want to learn English, do not pay taxes, increase crime rates, take jobs away from Americans, drain the economy and are a burden on the health care system.Posadas said she hopes by promoting the Development, Relief and Education of Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, people will become more aware of the potential of undocumented immigrants.“This would provide a pass to legal status so they can go to college, get careers and contribute to society,” Posadas said.A group of students from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s, Holy Cross and Indiana University South Bend (IUSB) helped make up the panel that addressed the issues of immigrations they personally faced.Panel member Felix Marquez, an IUSB student, shared his own story of how he was forced to leave El Salvador after he was recruited by the military at age 16.“[The military] said they were going to make me into a man and I’d go represent my country,” Marquez said.Marquez said his mother had other ideas and sent him to the United States where he would not be forced into a war she did not support. Upon his arrival in the United States in 1990, Marquez said he has learned English and was the first of his family members to attain a high school degree.Notre Dame freshman Luis Huerta was born a citizen of the United States to illegal immigrant parents. As result, Huerta’s family was forced to move multiple times and suffer in poverty.At age 5, Huerta said he remembers his teacher saying he would amount to nothing because of his parents’ social standing in life. He said that moment would inspire him to denying his cultural heritage for many years.“It wasn’t until high school that I was finally able to be proud of my heritage,” Huerta said.Huerta is currently pursuing a degree from Notre Dame alongside his mother, who is hoping to earn a degree in management.“I just want people to know that anything is possible here in the United States, it just takes time,” Huerta said.last_img read more

Panel Discussion: Building Bridges to Recovery

first_img By: Jason Snyder, DDAP Communications Director Panel Discussion: Building Bridges to Recovery Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Public Health,  Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog A few years ago, the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs (DDAP) created the Building Bridges to Recovery initiative, which encourages dialogue between medical providers and the recovery community. As part of that initiative and National Recovery Month, DDAP is convening a panel discussion from 9 to 11 am, Thursday, Sept. 29, at the State Museum in Harrisburg. It will be live webcast and offered as continuing medical education.The panel discussion will focus on ways to improve identification of people with addiction and ways to more effectively refer and treat them. Panel members will also identify and address barriers, including stigma, to those efforts. As part of the discussion, people in recovery will have an opportunity to share their insight and experience with the medical providers to better inform the discussion and direct next steps.Last year over 3,500 Pennsylvanians died from drug overdose – that is an astonishing 10 deaths a day and up from the more than 2,500 reported deaths in 2014. Having open and candid conversations and working together are vital tools in combating this terrible epidemic.For questions, please email ra-dasecretary@pa.gov.Opening SpeakersGary TennisSecretary, Department of Drug and Alcohol ProgramsRachel LevinePennsylvania physician generalJohn P. Gallagher, MD,Vice chair Pennsylvania Medical Society Board of Trustees and chair, Pennsylvania Medical Society Opioid Advisory Task ForcePanelDr. Thomas KohlBerkshire Family Medicine, Reading Health SystemBrandon Antinopoulos, Pharm.DPharmacy Manager, Hometown Apothecary DrugsDr. Roderick GroomesDirector, Armstrong County Memorial Hospital Emergency DepartmentCindi Coffman, BA, CADC, CCSAssistant Program Director, Cove Forge BHSDr. Bill SantoroChief, Section of Addictions Medicine, Reading Health SystemMedical Director, New DirectionsScott Scotilla, Psy.D. ICAADCScotilla Psychological Services LLCAndrew Schmitt, LCSWMazzitti and Sullivan Counseling ServicesJen Zampogna, MDLawyers Concerned for Lawyers and a person in recoveryOvis Mangum, BA, CEAPEAP Case Manager, Norfolk Southern Corp. and a person in recovery SHARE Email Facebook Twitter September 26, 2016   SHARE  TWEETlast_img read more

Samskip Takes the Lead in Autonomous, Zero-Emission Containership Project

first_imgMultimodal operator Samskip has been named lead partner in SeaShuttle, a project aiming at developing autonomous, zero-emission containerships that also compete on cost.“Samskip is delighted to take the lead in the project to develop next generation sustainable shortsea shipping,” Are Grathen, MD Samskip Norway, commented.The announcement coincides with the award of EUR 6 million (USD 6.8 million) of Norwegian government money to SeaShuttle project to take forward the development of two all-electric ships.To connect Poland, Swedish west coast ports and the Oslo fjord, the vessels will draw on hydrogen fuel cells for their propulsion power.“What distinguishes this project and will be key to its success is the combination of fuel and technology that will make it cost competitive with existing solutions. With our trusted project partners, we are convinced that such ambitions are realistic,” Grathen explained.Grathen said that aspirations for sustainability are best encouraged by door-to-door services that provided cost-effective and scalable competition with truck-ferry options, feeding into a pan-European distribution network. Automation of key shipboard activities would also bring cost savings.“Exporters increasingly seek lower and even zero emissions transport solutions, but they need to be assured on reliability, frequency, efficiency and cost effectiveness,” according to Grathen.“Once operational, there is no reason why zero emissions ships should not target the 2,000 truck loads passing through Norwegian ports every day,” he added.SeaShuttle is one of six initiatives included in PILOT-E, an EUR 100 million-plus scheme involving the Research Council, Innovation Norway and Enova, aiming to bring solutions for the climate-neutral industries of the future to market more quickly. SeaShuttle funding came from four Norwegian ministries.Other SeaShuttle partners include logistics consultant FlowChange, technology group Kongsberg Maritime, hydrogen integrator HYON and Massterly, a Kongsberg Maritime/Wilhelmsen venture developing autonomous vessel solutions.“Green shipping is a sector where Norway can be world leader in new and green technology. The conversion is underway, for example with many electric ferries. This year’s PILOT-E awards show that there are exciting plans to make shipping more environmentally friendly,” Anita Krohn Traaseth, CEO, Innovation Norway, said.“This is an important milestone on the long sailing to make the maritime sector emission free. We believe hydrogen and fuel cells are the future for large and long-distance ships, and we need projects like this in order to solve technical and practical issues,” Marius Gjerset, Technology Manager, Zero Emission Resource Organisation (ZERO), pointed out.Final SeaShuttle ports of call are yet to be determined, but it is already known that the fuel cell technology will convert hydrogen into power for propulsion in a process where electrolysis is envisaged as taking place in a Norwegian port.For the moment, the project envisages zero emissions during 20% of a round trip between Poland and the Oslo Fjord – sufficient for all operations in Norwegian waters. That proportion will grow as more stations fill hydrogen along the route.last_img read more