New rectors take charge at seven halls

first_imgThe new academic year brings with it many changes in dorm life. In addition to the opening of Dunne and Flaherty Halls, seven residence halls are welcoming new rectors this year. The seven new rectors, who will oversee and guide residential life, are Allyse Gruslin of Ryan Hall, Fr. Matthew Hovde of Zahm House, Zachary Imfeld of Morrissey Manor, Justin McDevitt of Stanford Hall, Fr. Christopher Rehagen of of O’Neill Hall, Rachelle Simon of Lewis Hall and Eric Styles of Carroll Hall.Gruslin, a native of Rhode Island and the recipient of a Master of Divinity from Notre Dame, said her desire to become a rector came from her experiences as an assistant rector (AR) in Lyons Hall last year.“I moved in Lyons, and I realized it was a wonderful experience, spending time with the women, getting to know them, just hanging out with them,” Gruslin said. “I knew there was something special about this ministry.”This desire to serve as a rector grew throughout Gruslin’s time at Lyons, she said.“It became this thing I felt like I had to try,” Gruslin said. “I knew this was something God was calling me to do.”Hovde, a Holy Cross priest who holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Notre Dame, has previously served as an AR for Sorin College and has worked in Campus Ministry and at the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). He was recently ordained a Holy Cross priest in April.Imfeld said becoming a rector was a long-term goal.“Being a rector has been a dream of mine since I was a freshman [at the University of Portland],” Imfeld said. “I just saw what the rector position was and thought it’d be a really cool opportunity for me to serve a great place like Notre Dame.”Imfeld said he hopes to help foster personal growth among the residents of Morrissey Hall.“I think [being a rector] is about getting to know the guys and spend time with them and help them to grow into the men that God is calling them to be,” Imfeld said.McDevitt, who recently graduated with a master’s degree in political science from Notre Dame, worked in places from Mexico, where he served on mission trips, to Iraq, where he served as a government contractor. In his time studying at Notre Dame, McDevitt was involved heavily with chorale. In an email, he said he felt a calling to be a rector after teaching political science at the University and wants to help Stanford Hall men become role models for living a good life. “Working with the incredible students here changed my life and made me understand that my calling is to serve and love and live for students,” he said. “I think a lot of other people knew I was meant to be a rector before I did because I had such a heart for teaching, but instead of politics I’ll just be teaching life. I constantly refer to being a rector as ‘my new life’ because that’s exactly what it is for me.”Rehagen, a 2009 graduate of Notre Dame and a Holy Cross priest, most recently served as a deacon and parochial vicar at Christ the King parish in South Bend.  He said his own experience in Alumni Hall made him want to “pay it forward”, and that he looked forward to working with the men of O’Neill Hall. “I know the guys are full of good ideas and hopefully we’ll put some of those in practice,” he said. Styles has a background in both church service and the arts, graduating from the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music. He has served as the parish liturgy coordinator at Saint Benedict the African East Catholic Church in Chicago. He said he was excited to be part of Carroll Hall’s tight-knit community; when he arrived over the summer, he fielded a steady stream of hall residents and alumni visiting to welcome him. “I was greeted by a student from Carroll the first day I got here,” he said. “The rumor mill worked, they found out I was working on campus, and a current student came by looking for me. They continued to come by over the first two weeks and just continued to show up.” Simon spent many years serving in a variety of organizations, including the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Campus Ministry at Boston College and the St. Louis Arc, which helps those with developmental disabilities. Simon did not attend Notre Dame, and said being a newcomer provides unique new challenges.“I think for me, because I’m new to all things Notre Dame, my biggest challenges will be learning at rapid speed, the culture of Notre Dame,” Simon said.  “So everything from the phrases, and the way the people know the campus really well.”Simon said she is excited to become a part of the Notre Dame community. “It just seemed like a great fit,” she said. “I prayed about it a lot, and what it means, in terms of building Christian community, and get[ting] to be a pastoral presence, I’m really excited about it. I think it’s just a really important time in people’s lives, in students lives, it’s a great time to be figuring out who you are and who God is, and about the world and what you’re going to do to contribute.”Associate news editor Emily McConville contributed to this report. Tags: Freshman Orientation 2016, new rectors, rectorslast_img read more

Food safety groups unveil outbreak response guidance

first_imgJul 15, 2009 (CIDRAP News) – A national consortium of groups that have a stake in managing foodborne illness outbreaks today released guidelines for outbreak response, a document that includes model practices for each investigation stage, giving local and state officials a baseline for assessing their current procedures. However, he said public officials’ willingness to implement the model practices will be the factor that improves the nation’s overall outbreak response. “As noted in the forward, it will only be as effective as our commitment to turn the guidelines into action,” he said. He said the CIFOR guidelines also give local and state officials a solid framework for achieving federal standards that address outbreak response. In a nutshell, the guidance promotes faster and better response methods that revolve around better communication and more uniform reporting between local and state officials, he said. For example, surveillance systems and incident logs should be compiled in a manner that’s easily accessible to other agencies. “This truly would identify patterns that aren’t being identified now,” Holmes said. Scott E. Holmes, manager of the Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department’s environmental public health division in Lincoln, Neb., told CIDRAP News that it took 2 years to develop the guidelines, which underwent rounds of extensive review and modification. Holmes is NACCHO’s representative on CIFOR. The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) today praised the new CIFOR guidelines. Tom Vilsack, USDA secretary, said in an HHS statement that was e-mailed to journalists that improving food safety is one of President Obama’s top priorities. In the overview section, the authors state that the guidelines are meant to be flexible and include a range of approaches with the rationale for each of them. For example, the guidance details the role of the Incident Command System (ICS), but acknowledges that not all agencies use this system. See also: Applying the guidelines isn’t going to be a major cost for local and state departments, he predicted. “It’s more a matter of doing the actions correctly,” he said, adding that adopting a model practice for some can be as simple as reorganizing how the response work gets done. Jul 7 CIDRAP News story “Officials release food safety plan, egg safety rules” Jul 15 CIFOR press releasecenter_img “The guidelines show that by working together, we can all dramatically improve our food safety system and further protect the public health,” she said. “We hope to further this collaborative effort through the Food Safety Working Group.” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius thanked CIFOR for its vital contribution toward food safety. Sebelius and Vilsack cochair Obama’s food safety group. In March Obama created a Food Safety Working Group, and on Jul 7 it announced its key steps for improving food safety, which included tougher standards to reduce Salmonella contamination, tighter enforcement at beef facilities, building a new trace-back and response system, and improving federal food safety oversight. CIFOR guidelines for foodborne outbreak response The guidelines start with a chapter on the fundamental concepts of surveillance and foodborne disease, followed by sections on planning, outbreak detection, investigation, and control measures. It also includes sections on specific topics such as multijurisdictional outbreaks, legal considerations, and performance indicators for foodborne disease programs. The group that authored the 200-page guidance report, the Council to Improve Foodborne Outbreak Response (CIFOR), is a multidisciplinary partnership of seven professional organizations and three federal agencies that seek to increase collaboration among a range of food safety officials. Its cochairs are the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) and the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). “The main thing is that this provides state and local departments with the best practices,” Holmes said, adding that there are currently no standardized methods for conducting a foodborne outbreak investigation. For example, some local and state departments use a shotgun approach with their food exposure surveys, while others typically use more targeted survey methods. Some states subtype isolates from patient specimens and submit them to national databases as soon as they receive them, rather than batching them. “Last week the Obama Administration took an important step forward by introducing tougher standards to reduce Salmonella contamination and E coli outbreaks, and the guidelines announced today will help government further that goal,” he said. Craig Hedberg, PhD, a foodborne disease expert at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, who wrote three of the guideline chapters and was a member of the CIFOR guidance work group, said the new document will serve as a yardstick for measuring future outbreak response activities.last_img read more

Lowry star as Raptors beat Lakers

first_img(BBC) – Kyle Lowry starred in the Toronto Raptors’ 107-92 victory over the Los Angeles Lakers in Orlando.The 34-year-old finished with 33 points, 14 rebounds and six assists while London-born OG Anunoby contributed 23 points.LeBron James led the Lakers’ charge with 20 points but could not prevent an 11th consecutive loss to the Raptors.“Against a couple of great guys, we came in wanting to play well and we did a good job,” Lowry said.The game was played on the third day of regular-season games inside the quarantine ‘bubble’ at Disney World in Florida, following a four-month shutdown because of the coronavirus pandemic.The Lakers remain top of the Western Conference at 50-15 while Toronto sit second in the Eastern Conference at 47-18, as the season nears the play-offs.last_img read more