1958 World Cup gave birth to Pele

first_img Tags: FIFA World Cup 1958 The 1958 FIFA World Cup, the sixth staging of World Cup, was hosted by SwedenArgentina, Chile, Mexico, and Sweden expressed interest in hosting the tournament. Swedish delegates lobbied other countries at the FIFA Congress held in Rio de Janeiro around the opening of the 1950 World Cup Finals. Sweden was awarded the 1958 tournament unopposed on 23 June 1950.Brazil’s team that won the 1958 FIFA World CupThe hosts and the defending champions, West Germany qualified automatically. Of the remaining 14 places, nine were allocated to Europe, three to South America, one to North/Central America, and one to Asia/Africa.The format of the competition changed from 1954: 16 teams still competed in four groups of four, but this time each team played each of the other teams in its group at least once, without extra time in the event of a draw. Two points were awarded for a win and one point for a draw. If the first two teams finished on equal points then goal average would decide who was placed first and second. As in 1954, if the second and third placed teams finished on the same points, then there would be a play-off with the winner going through. If a play-off resulted in a draw, goal average from the group games would be used to determine who went through to the next round. If the goal averages were equal then lots would have been drawn. These arrangements had not been finalized by the time the tournament started and were still being debated as it progressed. Some teams complained that a play-off match, meaning three games in five days, was too much, and before the second round of group matches FIFA informed the teams that goal average would be used before resorting to a play-off. This was overturned when the Swedish Football Association complained, ostensibly that it was wrong to change the rules mid-tournament, but also because it wanted the extra revenue from playoff matches.This was the first time that goal average was available to separate teams in a World Cup. It was used to separate the teams finishing first and second in one of the groups. However, all three playoffs finished with decisive results and so it was not needed to separate the teams involved in a tied playoff.Almost all the matches kicked off simultaneously in each of the three rounds of the group phase, as did the quarter-finals and semi-finals. The exceptions were Sweden’s three group matches, all of which were televised by Syeriges Radio; these started at other times so Swedes could attend other matches without missing their own team’s. Apart from these, one match per round was televised, and relayed across Europe by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU). Many Swedes bought their first television for the World Cup.In Group 4, Pele did not play until the last of Brazil’s group games, against the Soviet Union. He failed to score, but Brazil won the game 2–0 (much thanks to an impressive exhibition of dribbling prowess by his partner Garrincha and the group by two points. Previously, they had drawn 0–0 with England in what was the first ever goalless game in World Cup history. Eventually, the Soviet Union and England went to a playoff game, in which Anatoli IIvin scored in the 67th minute to knock England out, while Austria had already been eliminated. The English side had been weakened by the Munich air disaster, earlier in the year, which killed three internationals on the books of Manchester United, including England’s young star Duncun Edwards.Pele (center) finished the tournament with six goalsPlayoffs were also needed in Group 1 (Northern Ireland beat Czechoslovakia to join the defending champions West Germany in the quarter-finals) and Group 3 (Wales topped Hungary to advance with hosts Sweden). Hungary had become a spent force after their appearance in the final of the previous tournament. They had lost their best players two years before, when they fled in the wake of the failed uprising against the communist regime. In a rather restrictive sense, from the 1954 team, only goalkeeper Gyula Grocics, defender Jozsef Bozsik and forward Nandor Hidegkuti remained.In Group 2, Scotland faced Yugoslavia, Paraguay, and France. France topped the group, with Just Fontaine netting six goals. Yugoslavia finished second, while Scotland came in last.The quarter-finals saw France’s Just Fontaine continue in similar form as in the group stage, managing another two goals as France triumphed over Northern Ireland. West Germany’s Helmut Rahn put them into the semi-finals with a single goal against Yugoslavia, while Sweden went through at the expense of USSR. The other game in the quarter-finals saw Pelé score the only goal against Wales.In the semi-finals, Sweden continued their strong run as they defeated West Germany 3–1 in a vicious game that saw the German player Erich juskowiak sent off (the first ever German player to be sent off in an international game) and German veteran forward Fritz Walter injured, which further weakened the German team (substitutes were first allowed in the 1970 FIFA World Cup).In the other semi-final, Brazil and France were tied 1-1 for much of the first half. However, 36 minutes into the game French captain and most experienced defender Robert Jonquet suffered broken leg in a clash with Vavá, and France was down to ten men for the rest of the game (substitutions were not allowed back then). Brazil dominated the rest of the match, as a Pelé hat-trick gave them a 5–2 victory. Fontaine of France added one goal to his impressive tally.The third place match saw Fontaine score four more goals as France defeated West Germany 6–3. This brought his total to 13 goals in one competition, a record that still stands.FINAL.The final was played inSolna, in the Rasunda Stadium; 50,000 people watched as the Brazilians went a goal down after four minutes. However Vava equalized shortly afterwards and then put them a goal ahead before half time. In the second half Pelé outshone everyone, notching up two goals, including the first one where he lobbed the ball over Bengt Gustavsson then followed it with a precise volley shot. Zagallo added a goal in between, and Sweden managed a consolation goal.The Final saw many records made in World Cup history that still stand as of 2014. At age 17, Pelé simultaneously became the youngest player to participate in, score, and win a World Cup Final. Conversely, Nils Leidholm became the oldest player to score in a World Cup Final at 35 years, 263 Days. This final had the highest number of goals scored by a winning team (5), the highest number of total goals scored (7), and together with the 1970 and 1998 finals shares the highest goal margin of difference (3); Brazil played in all those three finals.The game is also notable for many firsts in FIFA World Cup. With the exception of the 1950 FIFA World Cup final group stage, this marked the first time that a World Cup host reached the final without winning it. Additionally, the match marked the first time two nations from different continents (Europe and South America) met in a World Cup final. It also marks the first and only World Cup hosted in Europe not won by a European team; a feat mirrored in 2014 where a World Cup hosted in the America was not won by a team from the Americas for the first time, with Germany beating Argentina 1-0 at the final.France’s Just Fontaine was the top scorer of the tournament.Just Fontaine (lofted) was the top scorer in the 1958 World Cup with 13 goalsComments last_img read more

“Somebody will lose a life” – Donegal fisherman warns of violent ‘mayhem’ in no-deal Brexit

first_imgViolence will be inevitable in the seas in the event of a no-deal Brexit, according to a Donegal fisherman. Fisherman Michael Cavanagh said he has no doubts over the prospects for violence if the UK leaves the EU without a deal on October 31.The Greencastle-based skipper, says that just after the initial March 29th deadline passed, an Irish crew fishing for crab off Scotland got a nasty shock, even though there had been an extension. “They went to haul their pots, but 400 of them had already been hauled and the eye (which crabs crawl through) had been cut out of all the pots. And it wasn’t Boris Johnson who did it,” Cavanagh told the Irish Times. Chief executive of the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation said the risk of conflict between fisherman was real unless an agreement allowing for the status quo to be retained for a period once Brexit happens was agreed.“Can you imagine telling fishermen from Greencastle that they can no longer fish outside their back door?” he asks.Irish fishermen, just like the French, will not be happy if they are barred from areas they have fished for generations, he stressed. “Neither Michael or I will be able to control this, ” he warns.Throw into the mix strong policing by Royal Navy boats protecting UK waters and there will be “mayhem”, warns O’Donoghue.He cites the tension between French and UK fishermen in the English Channel during the so-called scallop wars, when boats were rammed and stones thrown, as an indicator of the potential strife to come.“Somebody will lose a life,’ agrees Cavanagh.“Somebody will lose a life” – Donegal fisherman warns of violent ‘mayhem’ in no-deal Brexit was last modified: October 15th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Eureka downs Del Norte

first_imgAfter more than two weeks of postponements due to wet weather, the Eureka High baseball team found enough room in between showers of rain on Wednesday to play its first game since March 15.Wednesday’s game against Del Norte, a home contest played at Redwood Fields, counted as Eureka’s Big 5 Conference opener.Despite a rocky fifth inning and the threat of game-ending rain all afternoon, Eureka was able to shake off its rust in favor of some mud and down Del Norte 9-4 behind a collective effort …last_img read more

Young spenders: Blatant consumerism becomes new religion for adolescents

first_imgBhumika WattsSell them their dreams. People, especially kids, don’t buy things to have things. They buy hope. Sell them this hope and you won’t have to worry about your sales.” This celebratory song of a society high on materialism addressed to a conference of salesmen sums up the reality of,Bhumika WattsSell them their dreams. People, especially kids, don’t buy things to have things. They buy hope. Sell them this hope and you won’t have to worry about your sales.” This celebratory song of a society high on materialism addressed to a conference of salesmen sums up the reality of contemporary urban life.It turns adolescents into a significant consumer segment, not parent-dependant but individuals with an increasing urge to flaunt everything from mobile phones to designer clothes.Brand-consciousness, a fast growing trend among children, has its roots in this urge to belong, or in behavioural scientist Erich Fromm’s words “to stay close to the herd”. Arnish Uberoi, a 13-year-old student of Chennai’s Padma Seshadri Bal Bhawan, has no doubts about the importance of branded goods in his life.”I will remain popular and accepted if I wear popular brands,” he says. NEW DELHI Bhumika Watts (9)HANKERS AFTER: jeans and T-shirts, perfumes and shoes with flat heels. “My friend got her Walkman in a day, get me one this evening.”In an interview to a city tabloid, Vani Aggarwal, 13, remarked that she liked wearing only Guess and Versace clothes.She is not an isolated example; it is a recurrent message that strobes through Indian urban society. Children are defining themselves by what they possess. “I buy, therefore I am” has become the mantra for today’s teens.”Possessions” to them mean branded products that spell status and popularity. Gone are the days of cheap canvas shoes and frilly frocks sewn by mothers at home. Girls now want Mango T-shirts and designer-label jeans.advertisementBoys who were earlier brought up to take pride in ink-stained shirts and scuffed shoes now worry about what gel works best with their hair and what model of cell phones they sport.Their list of “must-haves” reads like a catalogue of a sophisticated mall: trendy clothes, watches, cosmetics, accessories, shoes, mobile phones, CDs, music systems, smart PCs, sports gear, hair dryers and umpteen other gizmos- all the fancy paraphernalia of the “with-it” lifestyle. The latest “necessity” is add-on credit cards over and above the fat weekly allowance for trips to hangout joints or to beauty salons.Arnish UberoiThe burgeoning purchasing power of these brand brats has given the market its little kings and queens. Even in times of economic gloom, the last thing parents compromise on is spending on their children. Estimates put the market for children’s products at Rs 5,000 crore.The confectionery market alone is estimated at Rs 1,400 crore and the apparel market at Rs 500 crore. While children’s footwear is a Rs 1,000 crore market, personal-care products are pegged at Rs 300 crore.”Children mostly come looking for nail polish, shine-control lotions and sunscreen,” says Saurabh Amte, beauty adviser at the Lakme counter at Delhi’s Shopper’s Stop. “They are so well-informed that even their parents seek their help,” he adds.Shweta Chhabria fits the bill. The 15-year-old student of Mumbai’s St Joseph’s Convent Girls School, recently asked her parents for EverYouth almond and apricot cream. She uses perfume every day and says trendy western clothes and junk jewellery make her happy.CHENNAI Arnish Uberoi (13) HANKERS AFTER: Play Station II, branded clothes, T-shirts and a mobile phone “Buy me PlayStation II, and I will perform better in studies and sports.” Even small children are big on cosmetics. Bhumika Watts, 9, a Delhi girl who still plays with dolls, says she is fond of perfumes. And cosmetics are not just a girlie craze. “I wanted the Aamir Khan cut, so I use Brylcreem and L’Oreal hair gel to keep them spiky,” says Nikhil, a 13-year-old student of Delhi Public School.Footing the bill are over-indulgent parents. There are, of course, some precocious youngsters who use emotional blackmail to get what they want. Arnish and his brother Adish, 15, often make “deals” with their parents for expensive video games, apparel and shoes in return for better performance at school. Arnish’s current demand is PlayStation II, a computer game that costs Rs 18,000.Children, in turn, are driven by peer pressure. Most adolescents fear peer rejection. “I borrow my friends’ designer clothes for the disco, otherwise I feel inferior,” confesses Sushmita Garg, 13, as she slips into borrowed embroidered trousers and a Benetton top at the ladies room at Delhi’s Le Meridien before heading for CJ’s, a discotheque that offers post-noon dance parties.Shweta ChhabriaThe conspicuous consumption race creates a rift between children, some kept in check by parents, others unabashedly materialistic.”There are separate groups in our class based on their spending habits,” says Vaishnavi Tannir, 12, of Delhi’s Vasant Valley School. “There is a nerdy group which doesn’t bother about fashionable brands and there is a popular group which judges others by the brands they wear,” she explains.advertisementWhat confounds adults is the amount of information children have on market trends. Samsika Marketing Consultants MD Jagdeep Kapoor conducted a study covering 1,344 children in the 9-14 age group in nine metros from 1999 to 2002 and identified nine prominent traits. MUMBAIShweta Chhabria (15)HANKERS AFTER: Capri pants, T-shirts, body and hair glitter, skin-care products, junk jewellery, funky shoes. “I will feel deprived if I don’t get the things I want.”In 2002, information, inquisitive- ness and income were added to the previous trait list of informal, intelligent, identity conscious, influential to accommodate the emerging trends.While market wizards are changing their coordinates, parents are a confused lot. Some admit they have encouraged expensive habits, while others say they don’t know where to draw the line.Some women live out their own aspirations through their children. “My mother did not allow cosmetics when I was a child so I am particular that my daughter does not look like a Plain Jane,” says Mumbai-based Pooja Chhabria, Shweta’s mother.She is a homemaker and stresses that the lavishness is not to make up for any lack of attention. But some part of it is just old-fashioned pampering. Says Anil Chhabria, Shweta’s father: “I love the twinkle in her eyes when she receives clothes and cosmetics.”Young Priorities: How many spend on whatClick here to EnlargeGuilt drives busy parents who have little time for their children to fill parenting gap by buying expensive gifts and doling out substantial pocket money. But more critical is the fear of “depriving” the child.”I don’t want my kids to suffer from low self-esteem,” argues Anuradha Uberoi, Chennai-based behavioural consultant and mother of Adish and Arnish. “Knowing how much poor self-esteem can damage a child has changed my outlook,” she explains.Family relationships are a casualty in this wave of consumerism. Cold wars erupt when parents oppose children’s demands. “Children use parental guilt to get their fancies fulfilled,” says psychiatrist Sanjay Chugh, who runs a counselling centre in Delhi. “Drifting away from family is a feature of adolescence, and teenagers seek role models among peers instead of parents,” he explains. TRENDS AND FADS An NFO-Coke teen survey identified broad types among adolescents:Vibrant Vanguards: The trendsetters- comfortable with their self-image and the most privileged with lots of pocket money and influence at home.Conspicuous Confidents: Early adapters need visible symbols of status and success to be ahead of others.Eager Beavers: The followers do their best to keep up with the trends set by leaders.Individualistic Idealists: The brand loyalists stay with the established choice and don’t care what’s in fashion.Plain Passives: Out of the mainstream, the underconfident Passives are yet to become serious consumers.Many parents are worried that consumerism may trap their children into a self-centred way of life. However, Susan Visvanathan, sociologist at Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University, argues that consumerism is part of the grammar of a globalised capitalist society.advertisement”Children who coerce parents into buying more goodies are only victims of a system,” she says. “The system does not believe in martyrs, only in survivors. Survival seems to mean an ability to enjoy without looking at the condition of the majority,” she ruminates. Role models have also changed. Mahatma Gandhi, Jesus Christ or Mother Teresa are no longer personalities children idolise. In TV programmes, films and advertisements, the icons are glitzy pop artists and movie stars. Youngsters tend to take the materialism expounded in ads as gospel. Advertisers target children as surrogates to advertise “adult” goods like cars and even credit cards. LG Electronics, for example, uses children in its ads for TVs and refrigerators. Companies know they can win the approval of parents for their brands by promotions in schools. In an interview to KidsCyclopaedia, a Net magazine, Reebok’s Executive Director (Sales and Marketing) Subhinder Singh Prem says their “Net Practice with Rahul Dravid” last year-on buying Reebok goods worth Rs 1,500 or more, there was a chance of joining a cricket camp with cricketer Dravid- was a hit.”Wooing the kid means wooing the entire family, since children drive the spending decisions,” says Amit Burman, director, Dabur India. A study by market research agency NFO-MBL confirms this. About 17 per cent of children in 7-14 age group decide on family purchases. Restaurant chains like Pizza Hut and McDonald’s have been quick to catch up. They offer birthday-party packages complete with return gifts, and decorations to make sure that the restaurants register in children’s mind as pleasure zones.Dangers of consumerism range from compulsive spending habits to the “disposable” culture. Products that were considered durables-like wristwatches and cameras for chil-dren-now find their way into the trash bin. Right now it is the buoyancy of consumerism that is most obvious. But when the tide ebbs, fulfilling the impossible dreams it has sold to children may not be child’s play.last_img read more

Football World Cup: India’s absence hasn’t deterred fans from making trip to Japan, Korea

first_imgAWAY WE GO: Kolkata fans heading off for the fields of dreamsWhat unites a retired dock worker, an LIC employee, a wine shop owner and a small businessman from Kolkata with the football World Cup in Japan and Korea? Well for one, they’re all going to be together for the,AWAY WE GO: Kolkata fans heading off for the fields of dreamsWhat unites a retired dock worker, an LIC employee, a wine shop owner and a small businessman from Kolkata with the football World Cup in Japan and Korea? Well for one, they’re all going to be together for the next 30 days.Indian participants in the World Cup are usually sleep-deprived television audiences as their own football team floats between 115 and 125 in the world rankings.But every four years, a small bunch of the faithful from India makes the pilgrimage to wherever football holds its high mass. This year too about 20 fanatics from Kolkata have signed up for World Cup packages and will be heading off for the sights, sounds and smells of football in the Far East.However, these are not well-heeled jet-setters with a penchant for foreign travel and dollars to burn. Former dock worker Pannalal Chatterjee and his wife Chaitali, wine shop owner N.C. Saha, LIC employee Pranab Kumar Mukherjee and compulsive sportswatcher Chittarajan Debnath are part of the small group that will be in Japan and Korea because they are passionate enough to save and scrimp from their meagre earnings to indulge their passion.The group has signed on for Leisure Sports Management’s (ISM) “football package” for the forthcoming World Cup. The sports and travel outfit has put together a programme which includes two league matches, two semi-finals and some sightseeing. A fortnight’s holiday with match tickets thrown in- for league matches they range from $60 to $150 (Rs 2,940 to Rs 7,350), according to lsm official Sabyasachi Dasgupta-will cost a little under Rs 2 lakh per head.advertisementAstonishingly, this will be Chatterjee’s sixth World Cup. Ever since his retirement in 1992 on a Rs 10,000 pension, Chatterjee, now 68, and Chaitali have done away with luxuries like outings and domestic help to squirrel away money for their grand indulgence. “We put aside Rs 3,000 every month without fail,” says Chaitali. A 1994 photograph with Brazilian soccer legend Pele is among their most treasured possessions.Mukherjee, the LIC employee, came to the World Cup in a truly miraculous way. A devotee of godman Lokenath Baba as well as Denmark’s Laudrup brothers, Mukherjee was spreading the baba’s gospel around the country when he ran into a man willing to foot some of his bills for the 1990 World Cup.”He has come through again this time. You think I’d be able to make it on my LIC salary?” But even a benefactor’s bucks don’t go far, so Mukherjee-much to the consternation of his travelling companions-has decided to skip meals to buy memorabilia. That is besides the special match uniform he has got tailored: a dhoti-kurta with the cup logos emblazoned on it.Debnath has dedicated his life to watching sport. He opted for an “early retirement” by handing over his share of the family business to his cousins. A sports addict, the 44-year-old has spent the last 20 years chasing sport over the world.Bangalore-based PV. Ramdas too is taking the road less travelled. Ramdas and his six-year-old daughter Vanya will backpack through Korea and Japan during the cup, sinking Rs 1.5 lakh into their adventure. Why? “Because not even God can predict when the World Cup will be played in our backyard next,” says Ramdas.The World Cup has opened up options for Indians to sign up to a new brand of travel: sports tourism. While a cricket package to the 1999 World Cup offered by Cox and Kings attracted 4,000 takers, there are fewer than 30 on board for the trip to Japan and Korea.This is because FIFA has stopped selling tickets directly, and opted for country-wise allocation since 1998. Which means countries like India are low on their priority list. When one soccer buff from India wrote to FIFA this year, officials said they would be happy to give him unlimited tickets to the final-for $3,000 (Rs 1.47 lakh) a pop.last_img read more

10 months agoEverton threaten Spurs plans for Boca Juniors midfielder Wilmar Barrios

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Everton threaten Spurs plans for Boca Juniors midfielder Wilmar Barriosby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveEverton are being linked with Boca Juniors midfielder Wilmar Barrios.Barrios has been linked with several of Europe’s top clubs, including Real Madrid, Tottenham and AC Milan.And Everton have now joined the race to land the Colombia central midfielder.He has a €20m (£18m) in his Boca Juniors contract, which could be triggered in January by the Toffees.Marca says the 25-year-old is up for moving to Europe from Argentina and a switch to Goodison Park would allow him to settle in alongside pal Yerry Mina, who joined from Barcelona in the summer. last_img read more