Chelsea v Arsenal player ratings

first_imgSee also:Chelsea punish Arsenal in fiery derbyBlues wait for news on keeper Courtois Wenger says he has ‘nothing to regret’Wenger outburst ‘not my problem’ – JoseBoss Mourinho hails Chelsea’s ‘magician’Chelsea keeper Courtois given all-clearWise: Duo can be all-time Chelsea greatsWenger apologises for pushing Blues bossOscar following in Deco’s rather than Mata’s footsteps under Mourinho Chelsea pair nursing minor injuriesFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

‘Healthy’ growth for SA’s IT market

first_img16 May 2008South Africa’s highly matured information technology (IT) services market has been growing at a healthy pace, fuelled by economic growth and national development projects, with research and advisory firm IDC expecting the market to exceed US$4-billion (about R30.01-billion) this year.In a recent research report, the agency found that IT outsourcing constituted more than a third of the services market, the largest market share of all IT services categories, followed by systems integration, deployment, and support services.This indicated a sophisticated and mature IT spending model, with a year-on-year growth of 11%, which was at odds with most of the Middle East and Africa region where outsourcing constituted a relatively a small percentage of IT services revenue.“Economic growth and national development projects are playing into the hands of IT services providers, both in terms of hardware and software implementations as well as custom development, outsourcing, and other services,” said IDC South Africa senior research analyst Pieter Kok in a statement this week.“A maturing marketplace is an important driving force behind the growth in services spending. As local companies develop their decision-making processes, the benefits of services delivered by an external provider are becoming more visible, fuelling further adoption.”Kok explained that as a result, clients were making better decisions, negotiating better terms, demanding better results, and hence, reaping the benefits of their IT investments.IDC predicts that the South African IT market will grow at an average annual rate of 11.3% to nearly $5.670-billion (about R43.13-billion) by 2011.The growth would be spurred by government projects such as adopting e-government strategies and the adoption of open source software, as well as preparations for the 2010 Fifa World Cup, technology upgrade cycles, de-regulation, and growth in the small and medium business market.The skills shortage in the country, however, remained a major inhibitor in the IT services market.“Despite public and private sector attempts to address the severe skills shortage in the country, filling vacancies and keeping them has been a tough task,” said Pieter Kok.“Should measures passed to remedy the situation prove futile, sourcing of expensive international skills will cause a drastic increase in the cost of doing business in South Africa, making it more difficult for local companies to effectively compete in an increasingly competitive marketplace.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Using data for scientific independence in Africa

first_img14 November 2014The Planet Earth Institute (PEI) has called for innovators to pitch ideas for data-driven projects that harness data to achieve real, practical, human impact in Africa, for entry in the first Africa Data Challenge. The challenge is part of the institute’s #ScienceAfrica UnConference, to be held at Impact HUB in Westminster, London on November 18. PEI is an international NGO that works for the scientific independence of Africa. The Africa Data Challenge is a groundbreaking competition. While the “data revolution” is a major theme in conversations on technology and business, there’s little discussion on how it can enhance Africa’s scientific development in a practical way. The Africa Data Challenge invites innovators from around the world to pitch their ideas for projects that can help translate and transmit the power of data to those on the continent. Projects are unlimited in scope and focus, but must be designed to have a practical, human application in the next 12 months. Contestants will present their project live in front of a panel that includes Beejaye Kokil, head of the economic and social statistics division at African Development Bank; David Tempest, head of director of access relations at Elsevier; Richard Pilling, director of professional services and analytics at Intel; and Marieme Jamme, entrepreneur and chief executive of SpotOne Global. The successful innovators will receive a cash prize of £7 000 (R124 000) and PEI’s support in rolling out their project. PEI’s second #ScienceAfrica UnConference is hosted by Lord Boateng and runs in partnership with the UN Economic Commission for Africa, the World Bank and the European Commission. It brings together over 120 people who are passionate about and working in science, development and Africa for an interactive day of workshops and discussions. Participants come from diverse sectors, including international policy makers, academics, students as well as the general public. The UnConference will also be live streamed on the PEI website and people are encouraged to use the #ScienceAfrica hashtag on Twitter to engage in a robust discussion about science, technology and innovation in Africa. Dr Álvaro Sobrinho, chairman of PEI, said: “Data holds a huge amount of promise for scientific development in Africa, and for many different business sectors too, but we haven’t yet fully explored how it can be used at a local level to improve lives. As an NGO we are always looking for practical ways to support science and technology, and this Africa Data Challenge will help do just that – developing and incubating new ideas with real impact. “I’m looking forward to supporting the winning project over the next year, and to rolling out the competition across Africa. Working with our partners around the world, we are deeply committed to supporting innovations in this way, and strengthening the growing movement for scientific investment and development in Africa.” PEI is an international NGO and charity working for the scientific independence of Africa. While other emerging regions have invested heavily in science and technology, Africa is falling behind in the race for scientific development. All of the group’s work is built around three pathways it believes will help to lead Africa to scientific independence: higher education, technological innovation, and policy and advocacy. “In other words, we want to support and strengthen higher education institutions, help incubate and seed-fund technologies able to drive scientific advancement and campaign for a science-led development agenda for Africa,” the organisation says. The institute is headquartered in London and has regional project offices in Luanda, Angola and Kigali, Rwanda. Source: APOlast_img read more

Inversion and drift mitigation workshop Dec. 14

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Cindy Folck, Ohio State University ExtensionRecognizing weather conditions that could cause inversions is important when using certain herbicides in corn and soybeans. On December 14, join a discussion about recognizing inversions as well as ways to improve communication between farmers growing sensitive crops and pesticide applicators.Inversion and Drift Management Workshop, presented by the Ohio State University Extension IPM program will be conducted on December 14 from 10 a.m. to noon. Farmers and pesticide applicators can attend the workshop in-person at the Ohio Department of Agriculture, 8995 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, OH 43068 or attend virtually through the online webinar link. More information about the workshop is available at http://go.osu.edu/IPMLeading off the workshop will be Aaron Wilson, weather specialist and atmospheric scientist with OSU Extension and the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center. Wilson will focus on weather conditions that cause inversions and provide useful measures and observation to help determine if inversions are happening. Wilson will also look at average growing years and the days available for herbicide applications that avoided inversion or wind concerns.Jared Shaffer, plant health inspector with the Ohio Department of Agriculture, will speak next focusing on FieldWatch, the sensitive crop registry available to Ohio farmers and used throughout the Midwest. Shaffer will showcase tools available for farmers with sensitive crops to communicate about the location of their crops. Shaffer will also detail techniques available to applicators to find real-time information about crops in the area and how this information can be used in their spray planning.There is no cost for the workshop; however, pre-registration is required at attend in-person at the Reynoldsburg location and is limited to the first 75 registrants. Registration is online at go.osu.edu/IPM.Commercial and private applicator recertification credits for core will be available only at the Reynoldsburg location. No recertification credits are available for online participants.For further information about the workshop, contact Cindy Folck at 614-247-7898 or folck.2@osu.edu. The workshop is sponsored by the OSU Extension IPM Program and the USDA NIFA Crop Protection and Pest Management Competitive Grants Program (Grant number: 2017-70006-27174).last_img read more

Should City Governments Sponsor Seed Funds?

first_imgRelated Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Analysis#start A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… In February, Portland, Oregon Mayor Sam Adams announced the city would put $500,000 towards a seed fund to help encourage regional startups. And on Friday of last week, the Portland Development Commission announced it had finally chosen the five local business leaders to help launch the fund, predicting it would be “open for business” by the fall.Portland isn’t the only city undertaking these sorts of early-stage investments. Last month, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced his city was sponsoring an Entrepreneurial Fund, in a partnership with Firstmark Capital that had over $20 million earmarked to fund startups.Following a rather dour report from the Kauffman Foundation that placed Seattle at the bottom of major metropolitan areas for entrepreneurial activity, the Seattle-based technology blog Techflash asked its readers if Seattle should setup its own, similar early-stage fund.The majority of responses to their poll were negative: the city had better ways to spend its money. And although the economic contribution of a healthy entrepreneurial climate is something that cities want to foster, managing these investments might prove difficult. While a city like New York not only has a sizeable startup fund but has a large community of investors, it remains to be seen how a small, city-run seed fund like Portland has created will impact both the local investment and the local entrepreneurial communities.What do you think? Should cities be in the angel business? What other steps – beyond the usual “tax incentives” – can cities take in order to help foster a strong local startup community?center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting audrey watters 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Heat make it official, signing Waiters, Johnson and Olynyk

first_imgOlynyk thinks he and Miami will be a great fit.“The culture here, I’ve heard so much about it,” Olynyk said. “I’m really excited about it.”Olynyk being added to the mix was the lone surprise.Johnson and Waiters had made clear they wanted to stay in Miami long ago.Johnson was courted by the Utah Jazz after Gordon Hayward left for Boston and said he was still getting used to the idea of being a sought-after commodity.ADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Jane De Leon meets fellow ‘Darna’ Marian Rivera China furious as Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View comments Miami Heat’s Dion Waiters shouts to the fans after shooting a basket in the final seconds of the game to secure the Heat’s victory over the Golden State Warriors during an NBA basketball game in Miami, Monday, Jan. 23, 2017. (Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald via AP)MIAMI— They came to the Miami Heat a year ago almost as afterthoughts, two guys with less-than-stellar reputations who didn’t exactly have an abundance of options.Those days are long gone for James Johnson and Dion Waiters.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Nikki Valdez rushes self to ER due to respiratory tract infection LATEST STORIES LaVar Ball on Lonzo’s debut: ‘His worst game ever’center_img Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Another vape smoker nabbed in Lucena They’re now cornerstones of Miami’s plan to return to contention.Capping several days of salary-cap maneuvering to make sure all the pieces fit the right way, the Heat announced the signings of Johnson, Waiters and newcomer Kelly Olynyk on Friday to new four-year contracts. All were agreed upon earlier this week, though Miami didn’t start closing those deals until more cap space was created earlier in the day by trading Josh McRoberts to Dallas.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool starsCombined, Johnson, Waiters and Olynyk’s deals have a maximum value of about $165 million. Those three played for $10 million last season.“As soon as Kelly Olynyk became an unrestricted free agent, we pursued him,” Heat President Pat Riley said. “He is not only a post player, he can also play away from the basket. What we like the most is that he is a playmaker, tough defender and rugged rebounder. At just 26 years old, he fits in perfect with our young core that will play together in their primes.” Pagasa: Kammuri now a typhoon, may enter PAR by weekend Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “It was my first time ever being in a situation like this,” Johnson said on Friday night. “Everything was mind-boggling and exciting at the same time. I was just riding the rollercoaster.”As intoxicating as it was, he had so many reasons to stay.Johnson could make over $60 million in the next four seasons, a huge bump from the $4 million he played for last season. He dropped 40 pounds, changed his body, changed his outlook and went from someone who bounced around the league — and carried a bit of an underachiever label — to someone Miami trusted to have on the floor at the end of games last season.Waiters transformed as well. He slimmed down at the team request, and his game took off — making him a go-to player in Miami last season.“Dion was so important to us,” Heat point guard Goran Dragic said. “He worked hard and you saw what that did for his game.”Much of the space Miami used this summer was created by the waiving of Chris Bosh, who still gets his $25.3 million salary for this season but doesn’t have it count against the Heat books. The Heat went after Hayward and lost out when he picked Boston, so that meant Miami went to what Riley described as Plan B: keeping its own guys.Waiters was the first big domino to fall Miami’s way in that plan, agreeing to his deal on Wednesday. Johnson and Olynyk agreed on Thursday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Nextlast_img read more