Hurricane Iota Becomes a Category 5 Storm

first_img– Advertisement – The storm was 100 miles southeast of Cabo Gracias Dios on the border of Nicaragua and Honduras with maximum sustained winds of 160 miles per hour, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said on Monday morning. The storm was moving west at 9 m.p.h. Iota was expected to make landfall in the area on Monday night.A hurricane warning was in effect for several cities along the coast of both countries, where the storm was expected to produce up to 30 inches of rain in some areas through Friday. The intense rainfall could lead to significant flash flooding and mudslides in higher elevations, the center said, and that Iota was forecast to make landfall in northeastern Nicaragua and eastern Honduras on Monday night. Forecasters warned that damage from Hurricane Iota could compound the destruction caused by Hurricane Eta in Central America. As Hurricane Iota intensified and inched closer to the coastline of Nicaragua and Honduras, it appeared that there would be no reprieve for Ms. Rodríguez and many others weary residents of the region.The storm, which was upgraded to a Category 5 hurricane Monday morning, was expected to make landfall by Monday night, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami. Those in the path of Hurricane Iota were not the only ones comparing it to Hurricane Eta.“It’s eerie that it’s similar in wind speed and also in the same area that Eta hit,” said Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman and meteorologist with the National Hurricane Center.The storm’s impact will be felt “well before the center makes landfall,” Mr. Feltgen said.- Advertisement – “I am afraid of the sea level,” Ms. Rodríguez said. “You can see the water coming up and up every minute, so I guess we will have to evacuate.”- Advertisement – The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season, which is set to end on Nov. 30, has seen 30 named storms and 13 hurricanes. Meteorologists exhausted the 21-name list that is used each season, turning to the Greek alphabet to name systems. The last time the Greek alphabet was used was in 2005, which saw 28 storms strong enough to be named.Scientists have found that climate change affects how hurricanes form and strengthen; rising ocean temperatures linked to global warming can cause storms to weaken more slowly and remain destructive for longer. In a recent study, scientists found that 50 years ago a typical storm would have lost more than three-quarters of its intensity in the first 24 hours, when it might travel several hundred miles inland, but now it would only lose about half.Alfonso Flores Bermúdez reported from Puerto Cabezas, Derrick Taylor from London, Allyson Waller from Texas and Neil Vigdor from New York. Johnny Diaz contributed reporting from Miami. More than 60 deaths were confirmed throughout Central America from Hurricane Eta. In Guatemala, rescuers feared that more than 100 people had been killed in the village of Quejá after the storm chopped off part of a mountain slope.Many people in the region were left homeless after a number of structures were damaged or destroyed. “Shelter is going to be a problem,” Mr. Feltgen said.Dozens of Indigenous communities were evacuated starting on Saturday night in Nicaragua and Honduras. In Puerto Cabezas, families were sleeping amid the rubble left from the previous hurricane.Elsewhere in the country, it was not immediately clear how many people had been transferred to shelters, but photos taken by residents showed hundreds of people being evacuated in Cabo Gracias a Dios and other remote villages.SINAPRED, the National System for the Prevention, Mitigation and Attention of Disasters in Nicaragua, had also suspended sailing and fishing in nearby waters.Sadam Vinicius, a father of three, decided to stay with his family at their home near the coast. Afraid of losing his roof, he tried to save it from damage by tying it up with ropes he uses for his work as a fisherman. “We have not received any aid from the government yet,” Mr. Vinicius said. “I am afraid of losing my roof.” PUERTO CABEZAS, Nicaragua — The situation was all too familiar for Marina Rodríguez: A destructive storm in what has been a record-setting Atlantic hurricane season was bearing down on the Mosquito Coast.The previous storm, Hurricane Eta, washed away her home less than two weeks ago, said Ms. Rodríguez, 47, whose children were helping her build a temporary shelter on Sunday.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Sherwood grateful for Lerner’s cash

first_img The owner was looking to leave after officially putting the club on the market last year, but after failing to sell he gave Sherwood the green light to spend. Barcelona’s Adama Traore is close to becoming Villa’s 10th signing of the summer ahead of Friday’s Barclays Premier League match against Manchester United. Rudy Gestede, Idrissa Gueye, Jordan Ayew and Jordan Amavi are among the summer arrivals at Villa as Sherwood rebuilds the squad following the exits of Christian Benteke and Fabian Delph. It is a change of direction from Lerner after he clamped down on spending under former boss Paul Lambert, and Sherwood is grateful. “He doesn’t have to talk. He is showing it by his actions that he is willing to back this football club and take us in the correct direction,” he said. “I think a football club is like a player, you’re always for sale depending on what someone wants to pay. If someone wants to pay a huge amount of money and Randy decides he wants to sell then it’s his decision. “In the meantime he is not sitting on his hands, he is actively trying to do something to improve this club. “It’s good the club have backed me and it needed change. We have sold a lot of players and we brought in a lot of money. The owner has not put that back in to his pocket, he has reinvested it into the squad.” Villa host United on Friday but will be without Carles Gil (ankle), Jack Grealish (hamstring) and Jores Okore (knee). They beat Bournemouth 1-0 on the opening day, thanks to Gestede’s debut goal, and Sherwood believes they can topple Louis van Gaal’s side. “It’s a transition period for them again, as it was last season. They have brought in a lot of new players,” he said. “I think every team has their own problems early in the season. It’s never fluid but we fancy ourselves against Manchester United. We fancy ourselves against any team.” Tim Sherwood has praised Aston Villa chairman Randy Lerner for sanctioning his summer spending spree. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Tokyo marks one year to go until Olympics… again

first_imgBy Jack Tarrant, Akira TomoshigeTOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese swimmer Rikako Ikee, who is battling back from leukaemia, provided a glimmer of hope for embattled Tokyo Olympics organisers during a sombre yet poignant ceremony to mark one year to go until the rearranged Games on Thursday.The Olympics were due to begin on Friday with an extravagant opening ceremony in the National Stadium but the Games have instead been delayed until July 23, 2021 because of the global COVID-19 pandemic.A subdued 15-minute ceremony took place in an empty and dark National Stadium, where footage was shown to highlight next year’s Games.Ikee, who won six titles at the 2018 Asian Games and was considered a strong medal contender for the Olympics before her illness, stood under a spotlight dressed in all white as she represented a figure of hope for Tokyo. “Imagine the world a year from now,” she said while holding the Olympic flame in a lantern.“How wonderful it will be to see the curtain raising on the Olympic and Paralympic Games. We are currently living in a world of ups and downs. I sincerely hope that the peace and calm of daily life returns as soon as possible.”Various venues that will host Olympics events next year, including the newly-built Ariake Arena, were lit up in the Olympic colours to mark the occasion. Last year, International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach presided over a glitzy ceremony to mark the occasion in the Japanese capital and declared Tokyo the best prepared host city he had ever seen.This time around the atmosphere was much more subdued and Thursday’s small ceremony is a sign of things to come in the lead-up to the Games next year.“We have to prepare for multiple scenarios of the Games,” Bach told broadcaster Eurosport, the Games’ official broadcaster in Europe, on Thursday.“We don’t know how the world will look like in one year. So we are preparing for all the different scenarios. The top priority is that these Olympic Games will only take place in a safe environment for everybody,” he said. Asked whether the Games could go ahead even without fans, Bach said the organisation needed to adapt to the circumstances.“In this world you have to adapt yourself. We are working to optimize the Games, to simplify the Games, to adapt it to the time we are living in. We are not living on a spacecraft, we are in the middle of the world society.”The head of the IOC’s Coordination Commission John Coates has said rearranging the Games meant focusing on the “must haves” in a simplified event.In response, Tokyo 2020 Chief Executive Toshiro Muto said over 200 simplification measures were under consideration.  Thursday’s landmark comes as the Japanese capital reported 366 new coronavirus cases, a new daily record, fuelling fears of a second round of infections.last_img read more