McIlroy and Horschel bury hatchet

first_img “I was up against Horschel on the first day, too,” McIlroy recalled the following year of the incident in 2007. “I messed up the last hole and lost to him. I wasn’t happy. “Then I got him again, twice, on the Sunday. His antics were really p****** me off. For example, he had hit a bunker shot at the 14th in our morning foursome. It was a great shot and finished inches from the cup. But he came running down the hill hollering at the top of his voice. He was so loud and so obnoxious. “Anyway, that outburst of his was probably the worst thing he could have done. In the second singles, I set out to be as loud as he was. “On the first tee I ripped a drive up the middle, hit my seven-iron approach to maybe 15 feet – I was shouting ‘Be good! Be good!’ all the way – and holed the putt for an eagle. “When the ball went in, I gave it the loudest ‘Come on!’ you’ve ever heard. I think he got the point.” While the row between Sergio Garcia and Tiger Woods drags on, Rory McIlroy and Billy Horschel certainly appeared to have settled their differences as they practised at the US Open on Wednesday. McIlroy and Horschel fell out at the Walker Cup in 2007, with the world number two turning on the American when the pair met on the final day at Royal County Down. McIlroy and Horschel could be seen talking amicably as they played the 16th hole alongside Woods, with the threesome completing eight holes together. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Point-counterpoint: Worst sound in sports

first_imgKevin HagstromHaving endured 27 roars by the Nittany Lions for every Penn State first down during last Saturday’s football game, I began sifting through the worst chants or in-game sound bites in sports. One of the first that popped up is close to home: “First-and-10 Wisconsin.” As mind-numbing as repeating exactly what the PA announcer said is, at least it’s well-known. The chant I’m about to throw out on a whim, however, makes sense to no more than a handful of people. Plus, it’s a good thing that it doesn’t go down on the field. We’re not talking about practice; we’re talking about the School of Practical Science of Toronto University’s chant. Never heard of it? Well, duh. No one else has either, which is why the chant is so ridiculous — “Who are we? Can’t you guess? We are from the S.P.S.!”Now who in his right mind comes up with a chant that means little without explanation? And no, I can’t guess.The School of Practical Science may be good at math and applied sciences but by golly, it sure doesn’t know how to communicate ideas in a clear and concise manner; it’s asking for trouble by formulating the chant into several questions followed by a vague acronym. It’s like saying to Michigan running back Mike Hart after talking to him once, “Remember me? I’m Kevin.” He isn’t going to know what’s going on or who I am. Nor will he care. “Why have a cheer? It doesn’t make sense. Can you believe it? S.P.S. is quite dense.”Ben VoelkelIn the vast world of sports arenas, certain characteristics and traditions stand out and eventually become synonymous with the team and arena. What would an Oakland Raiders game be without the Black Hole or a Detroit Red Wings game without octopi on the ice after a hat trick?The same goes for in-game sound bites and chants. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers Raymond James Stadium is known for the pirate ship that fires a cannon after the home team scores a touchdown. What would a Minnesota Vikings game at the Metrodome be without the god-awful, obnoxious Viking horn noise? A little easier on the ears possibly, but it would still be missing that something. And even a little closer to home, a Badger football Saturday without “Eat shit, fuck you” echoing off the walls of Kellner Hall and Camp Randall’s upper deck would mean an unusual PG-13 atmosphere.But just because it is tradition, doesn’t mean it’s good. As bad as the Vikings horn is, that pales in comparison to the worst chant at a sports event.That distinction goes to DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL.No, caps lock didn’t stick. The chant, a creation of Pistons’ public address announcer John Mason, might be OK if it wasn’t repeated seemingly every time the Pistons take control of the ball. Opposing team’s center dribbles the ball off his foot and out of bounds one minute into the game: DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. Chauncy Billups gets swatted, but the ball goes out of bounds, and the Pistons keep it: DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. The home team gets the ball to start the third quarter: DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. It’s not just the repetition that makes it worst, but the painful, arrogant tone in which it’s done. DE-TROIT BASKET-BALL. COU-NT I-T!last_img read more

“Grow Monmouth” To Spur Economic Development

first_imgOne thing we do know is that we cannot wait for Washington to come up with the magical  solution. If we are to bring ourselves out of this downturn we have to do it through the creation of jobs. Getting people back to work is the key to stimulating our economy. By THOMAS A. ARNONE It has been three years since the U.S. economy nose-dived, taking jobs and consumer confidence with it. Yet despite all efforts to stimulate prosperity, the country is still reluctant to bounce back and return to happier times of healthy growth. To bolster that effort here at home, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders have launched a program called “Grow Monmouth,” a long-term communitywide initiative to ensure the economic health of Monmouth County. In recent weeks, representatives from the Monmouth County Department of Economic Development and I have met with businesses, academia, utility companies and business organizations to talk about the program and how they can become partners in this effort. Elected representatives from all 53 municipalities have been invited to attend meetings scheduled for Oct. 20 and Oct. 25 to discuss how the Grow Monmouth initiative can assist them with their economic development efforts. As part of Grow Monmouth, the county is currently developing an economic opportunity mapping tool. This is a Geographic Information System (GIS) tool that will identify various information within the municipalities. This information can help municipalities and businesses determine the most favorable locations for economic growth. Information in the GIS layering will include zoning, environmental constraints, utilities, roadways and transportation.center_img It’s no secret that what our economy needs right now is jobs. In order to create jobs, our businesses need all the help they can get. County government’s role is to facilitate job creation and business expansion. The objective of these meetings is to gather input from a variety of key sectors and develop a strategic plan that will outline goals and the means to achieving them. The county is also establishing an Advisory Committee to provide input to the plan. Grow Monmouth will also provide assistance to businesses to help maximize their potential for growth. A business-building toolkit has been developed. The toolkit includes resources for competitive business information research, business to business and consumer mailing lists, survey capability, and Web site optimization. ***ITALS Thomas A. Arnone is a Monmouth County freeholder This initiative has three objectives: retain and grow businesses in Monmouth County; retain and create jobs in Monmouth County, and to encourage the attraction of new businesses to Monmouth County.last_img read more

Ranney Robotics Club Competes in Top Tournament

first_imgTINTON FALLS – The Ranney School Robot­ics Club has been working hard all year to design, build and drill their robots for multiple competitions. All their hard work paid off recently when one of the Upper School robotics teams, led by Raymond Moser ’15 of Shrewsbury, had the opportunity to travel to Anaheim, Calif., and compete in the VEX World Robotics Championship.Members of the Ranney School Robotics Club.More than 15,000 people, including students, teachers, coaches and industry leaders attended the event, representing 24 countries. Approxi­mately 700 teams competed at the middle school, high school and college level.  Simply qualifying for the championship meet meant that the Ranney team ranked in the top 9 percent of all teams worldwide.The event was streamed live and part of it was shown during the April 18 Ranney School Lower School Science Fair on the RSPA Panther Hall and Roberts Stage screen.“The experience was extre­me­ly valuable because we learned many different methods of improving our robot’s speed, size and agility for next year,” said Noel Delgado, dean of students, who attended the competition with robotics team coach Raymond Moser. “With a larger robotics space planned for next year, a 2013-2014 robotics class offering, as well as several supporting gifts from families, our team will be larger, more enthusiastic, better equipped and superbly prepared for next year’s tournament. Our goal is to bring two of our teams to next year’s world championship.”last_img read more