Solari: Bale issue is an internal matter

first_imgSantiago Solari says he will deal with Gareth Bale in private after the Real Madrid forward reportedly left their loss to Real Sociedad early.Bale was not in the squad for Sunday’s 2-0 La Liga defeat at the Santiago Bernabeu as the Wales international is sidelined by a calf injury.But with Madrid slipping to a sixth loss of the league season, Bale was pictured driving away from the stadium with more than 10 minutes to go. Article continues below Editors’ Picks ‘There is no creativity’ – Can Solskjaer get Man Utd scoring freely again? ‘Everyone legged it on to the pitch!’ – How Foden went from Man City superfan to future superstar Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Although Bale starred at the Club World Cup with a hat-trick in the semi-final against Kashima Antlers, his La Liga form has been mixed.The 29-year-old has only scored one league goal since September 1 and has again been linked with a move away from Madrid.Solari, though, would not reveal whether or not Bale will be punished for leaving the Sociedad match before full-time when he spoke to reporters ahead of Wednesday’s Copa del Rey tie at home to Leganes.”The fact that Bale left the Bernabeu is something to be solved inside the dressing room,” Solari told a news conference.2018 has been a great year. Onwards and upwards and here’s to 2019. Happy New Year!  pic.twitter.com/EWmfsecMAW— Gareth Bale (@GarethBale11) December 31, 2018Solari was left frustrated by VAR after the technology was not used to award Vinicius Jr a penalty during his side’s defeat to La Real, which left Madrid fifth in the table and 10 points behind leaders Barcelona.And the under-pressure coach again hit out at the use of VAR ahead of Leganes’ visit for the first leg of their last-16 tie.”It all depends on the rules being more clear than the technology,” he added.”If the rules are applied in the same way then it doesn’t really clear things up.”Sometimes as a spectator, I don’t understand how it works. They will perfect it.”The other days they were not complaints, just us defending ourselves, which is our right.”Solari is unsure whether Brahim Diaz, who joined the club from Manchester City this week, will be available to face Leganes.”Brahim is fine, very happy to join Real Madrid,” he continued. “He made a great choice picking the number 21 [also worn by Solari at Madrid].”It will depend on administrative paperwork, I’d imagine.”last_img read more

Parent of United Airlines boosts 2Q earnings 38 pct as higher fares

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by Joshua Freed, The Associated Press Posted Jul 25, 2013 7:58 am MDT Parent of United Airlines boosts 2Q earnings 38 pct. as higher fares offset a dip in flying Higher fares and a lower fuel bill led to a 38 per cent profit jump for the parent of United Airlines in the second quarter.Fewer passengers flew on United from April to June, but those who did paid slightly more. Not just for plane tickets, either. United boosted revenue from add-on charges such as baggage fees and seats with more legroom.Last spring, United was struggling to merge some of its large computer systems with Continental, resulting in snafus that frustrated passengers and hurt fares.In the most recent quarter, a key measure of per-seat passenger revenue rose 1 per cent as United recovered. The airline projected that per-seat revenue would rise as much as 5 per cent in the third quarter.“We have clearly turned the corner post-merger, and I am confident that we are on a path toward becoming the world’s leading airline,” said Jeff Smisek, the airline’s chairman, president, and CEO, on a conference call.United sees one path to greater profitability in collecting more money for add-ons. Revenue for its extra-legroom Economy Plus seats jumped 37 per cent in the most recent quarter. United hopes to sell more of those seats through the Sabre ticket distribution system next year. Sabre processes sales to large corporate travel clients and online booking sites such as Travelocity, which Sabre owns.United also sells “subscriptions” for a $500 fee that entitles a passenger to Economy Plus for a year. And it’s rolling out satellite-based Internet connections that it will sell to passengers. Revenue from add-ons like that rose by 13 per cent to more than $20 per passenger in the second quarter, United said.“We believe there is considerable room for us to grow in this high-margin space,” said Chief Revenue Officer Jim Compton.The airline is also aiming to bring so-called “revenue management” to more of those fees. Airlines have long sold tickets for different prices depending on how much demand there is for the flight and how far in advance the customer is booking. Now it’s doing the same thing with those Economy Plus seats.The next step will be to make different offers to different customers, Compton said. United deals with 140 million passengers per year, “not all of whom want or value the same thing from us, and not all of whom in return create the same value for the company,” Compton said. He said United will beat its earlier goal of raising revenue from add-ons by 9 per cent.United Continental Holdings Inc. earned $469 million, or $1.21 per share, for the quarter. It would have earned $1.35 per share if not for special items. That’s a penny better than expected by analysts surveyed by FactSet. A year ago it earned $339 million, or 89 cents per share.Revenue rose almost 1 per cent to $10 billion, about what analysts had expected.United cut flying by 2 per cent compared to a year earlier. Its fuel bill dropped 10 per cent on a combination of the reduced flying and an 8 per cent drop in the per-gallon price of fuel.Lower fuel bills helped all of the big airlines in the most recent quarter. But oil prices have risen in recent weeks, likely dampening the relief for airlines.Shares of Chicago-based United Continental fell 67 cents, or 1.9 per cent, to $34.30. read more