Students share immigration stories

first_imgLa Fuerza, the Saint Mary’s club that represents Latina culture, hosted Immigration Monologues Thursday as a part of Action Week. Club president Cristina Posadas began the lecture by addressing six myths commonly associated with immigrants.She said the myths are that immigrants do not want to learn English, do not pay taxes, increase crime rates, take jobs away from Americans, drain the economy and are a burden on the health care system.Posadas said she hopes by promoting the Development, Relief and Education of Alien Minors (DREAM) Act, people will become more aware of the potential of undocumented immigrants.“This would provide a pass to legal status so they can go to college, get careers and contribute to society,” Posadas said.A group of students from Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s, Holy Cross and Indiana University South Bend (IUSB) helped make up the panel that addressed the issues of immigrations they personally faced.Panel member Felix Marquez, an IUSB student, shared his own story of how he was forced to leave El Salvador after he was recruited by the military at age 16.“[The military] said they were going to make me into a man and I’d go represent my country,” Marquez said.Marquez said his mother had other ideas and sent him to the United States where he would not be forced into a war she did not support. Upon his arrival in the United States in 1990, Marquez said he has learned English and was the first of his family members to attain a high school degree.Notre Dame freshman Luis Huerta was born a citizen of the United States to illegal immigrant parents. As result, Huerta’s family was forced to move multiple times and suffer in poverty.At age 5, Huerta said he remembers his teacher saying he would amount to nothing because of his parents’ social standing in life. He said that moment would inspire him to denying his cultural heritage for many years.“It wasn’t until high school that I was finally able to be proud of my heritage,” Huerta said.Huerta is currently pursuing a degree from Notre Dame alongside his mother, who is hoping to earn a degree in management.“I just want people to know that anything is possible here in the United States, it just takes time,” Huerta said.last_img read more

Professor offers advice in ‘Last Lecture’ series

first_imgThe Last Lecture series kicked off on Monday evening in Washington Hall with a talk by Maria McKenna, senior associate director of the Education, Schooling and Society minor. McKenna is also an associate professional specialist in the Department of Africana Studies. Sponsored by the academic affairs department of student government, the series asks student-nominated professors, “What wisdom would you try to impart to the world if you knew it was your last chance?”McKenna said she prepared her lecture by thinking about what she would want to say if she were giving a final speech to her four children.“If the only people who were in this room were my four kids, what would I want them to know?” McKenna said.She then began her speech by reading off a list of quotes and advice from her family and friends whom she asked for help in preparing her lecture. Although the content of each piece of advice differed, McKenna said she found a common theme of “keeping it real” and staying honest to yourself and those around you. She said she realized the importance of this maxim from an early age and throughout the rest of her life.McKenna said she assumed an incredible amount of responsibility in her family at an early age and was afraid to communicate her fears and insecurities to her parents. Ultimately, she was able to find a way to be honest with them and find peace. Even still, McKenna said relationships and life in general are inevitably messy despite what the culture around us says.“The world we live in tells us we have to look put-together,” McKenna said.McKenna said she is able to find happiness in the messiness and imperfection in her life, whether they be a massive pile of dirty laundry or commitments to taking care of others.“The faster we come to realize things are messy, the sooner we will be happy,” McKenna said.According to McKenna, everyone has many identities in life — from roles as family members and friends to jobs and duties — but individuals must not compartmentalize everything they do and risk losing their integrity.“Don’t confuse what you do with who you are,” McKenna said.McKenna said relationships are essential to finding stability in life, citing the support of her husband. When she was plagued with anxiety and considering suicide, McKenna said her husband saved her from despair and made sure she recovered. She said the honesty in their relationship was the basis for everything they accomplished.“You can’t be afraid of telling the truth in relationships,” McKenna said.McKenna quoted former Notre Dame professor Carol McLeod, wife of former Notre Dame basketball coach John MacLeod, who said relationships are a “90/10 deal and not a 50/50 one” and in order to have a successful relationship, you have to be willing to be on both sides of the split.Concluding her lecture, McKenna said when she finally dies, she hopes that people will remember her integrity and her willingness to give her all in whatever she did. Tags: Academic Affairs, Education Schooling and Society, Last Lecture series, Maria McKenna, Professor Maria McKennalast_img read more

Lawyers deliver oral arguments to appellate court on ESPN lawsuit

first_imgAttorneys from Notre Dame and ESPN delivered oral arguments before a three-judge panel in the Indiana Court of Appeals on Wednesday, the latest development in a lawsuit hinging on Notre Dame Security Police’s (NDSP) status as either a public or private agency, the South Bend Tribune reported Tuesday afternoon.Lucy Du ESPN argued in its appeal that Indiana’s Access to Public Records Act (APRA), in its current state, applies to private campus police departments, despite the decision issued in Notre Dame’s favor by St. Joseph Superior Court Judge Steven Hostetler last April.“What we know from Notre Dame’s own crime logs is they arrest, search, interrogate for crimes such as rape, burglary, larceny, aggravated battery, counterfeit, drug possession, DUIs — these are not the actions of your library security guard who is there to make sure that kids don’t take books,” ESPN attorney Maggie Smith said, according to an audio recording of the oral arguments available on the Indiana Judicial Branch’s website.ESPN filed a lawsuit against the University in January 2015 after NDSP refused to release incident reports related to student-athletes on two separate occasions.Since October 2014, two state officials — Public Access Counselor Luke Britt and Attorney General Greg Zoeller — have said they believe Notre Dame to be subject to APRA. Although Hostetler ruled in Notre Dame’s favor, he said there were “persuasive reasons” for the Indiana legislature to amend public record laws.During the appeal, the judges referenced Indiana House Bill 1022, which would change state law to require private university police departments to disclose certain records. The bill passed unanimously in the Senate in January and will soon be voted on in the Senate.Throughout the trial process, Notre Dame has maintained its stance that Indiana lawmakers did not intend for APRA to apply to private colleges and universities.“Certainly, the question before the court here is whether or not the Notre Dame police department is a public agency subject to the law,” Notre Dame attorney Damon Leichty said. “… We think the statute is plainly clear. We think the specific provision that defines ‘law enforcement agency’ clearly does not capture this department.”Leichty said NDSP derives its power to arrest from the Notre Dame Board of Trustees, not the state. However, Judge Rudolph Pyle questioned how this power to arrest was “magically” given to the Board of Trustees, when the state of Indiana is listed as the authority behind any charges.NDSP currently releases a limited amount of information about campus crimes, in compliance with the Cleary Act, which applies to all schools that receive federal funding.Smith argued there are already mechanisms in place that allow public colleges and universities to fulfill with their Cleary Act obligations and their obligations to comply with public record laws.“The functions performed by the Notre Dame police department, in its context of being an educational police force, are exactly the same as the functions performed from IU, Purdue, Ball State,” she said. “[They] are subject to both, and they do it just fine.”If the court finds private universities to be subject to public record laws, Leichty said other private entities with police departments — including hospitals, investigation agencies and railroad companies — would be impacted.Chief Judge Nancy Vaidik said the court would issue a ruling “as soon as possible,” though she did not provide a timeline.Tags: APRA, Espn appeal, ESPN lawsuit, NDSPlast_img read more

Students and faculty discuss Latinos in higher education

first_imgSaint Mary’s “Week of Poder,” hosted by La Fuerza and the Student Diversity Board, kicked off this Monday with a discussion about different experiences speakers had while pursuing higher education as a Latino or mentoring Latinos in higher education.Leonard Sanchez, professional specialist in social work; Marc Belanger, chair and associate professor of political science; and Ty West, associate professor of modern languages, spoke at the event. Other speakers included Saint Mary’s international student and scholar advisor Adriana Petty, Saint Mary’s 2015 alumna Christin Kloski and the associate director of the TRiO Upward Bound program through Notre Dame, Rafael Marin.During the talk, several speakers brought up issues they experienced while pursuing higher education.Sanchez said in college he had to talk with the head advisor in order to be put in the classes he needed to graduate and had a conversation with the president of his alma mater about diversity on campus.“You have to believe that we’re going to graduate and that it’s an attainable event,” Sanchez said in regards to the conversation he had with the president of his alma mater. “You shouldn’t look at us and say, ‘You are so lucky or blessed to be here.’ I know that I am blessed, but you have to give us the same chance to succeed.”Marin said he was born in Texas and then moved back to Mexico with his mother when he was young. He moved to America for high school and had to learn the language quickly.“I had to work two or three times as hard as any other students in college,” he said. “Other students who did not have the language barrier have other challenges. We all face challenges that are different from one student to the next, minority or not.”Marin said he was often teased for his accent in high school and college.“Stereotypes create false images of not just Latinos, but many different ethnic groups,” Marin said. “It is your job to change the stereotypes.”It is important to focus on higher education., Kloski said.“One of the stereotypes is that [Latinas] are under-educated,” she said. “Well, look, we’re all here and proving them wrong. Focus on your education and be proud when you succeed.”Sanchez explained how he grew up in Portland and was the first generation in his family to attain a college degree. He said his decision to attend college was inspired by the Holy Cross Order.“The Holy Cross Order had a program where graduates from college would volunteer for a year in my community,” he said. “These young people were the first to mentor me and took me under their wing from when I was in third grade to college. Without them, I wouldn’t have known all it took to apply to colleges.”Petty said she went to high school in South Bend and was the first generation to attend college. Mentors were essential during her time on campus, she said.“I got involved in La Fuerza and the older girls really mentored me,” she said.“They helped me navigate around campus life and issues in the classroom.”Belanger discussed how important it is for Saint Mary’s students to build relationships with faculty.“Professors will write you a letter for grad school and and they won’t just say you did a good job in class — they will write about whole person,” he said. “Professors here do care about you. Be confident that if you’re here, you belong here.”West explained how he uses his time spent in Mexico as a tool to connect with Saint Mary’s students.“I try to bring the real world into the classroom and use concrete examples from the Latin American civilization to foster respect, knowledge and break down stereotypes and barriers we all confront,” West said.Sanchez said working at Saint Mary’s has been beneficial towards his goal of giving back to the community and giving others the opportunity to succeed at higher education.“When I came to Saint Mary’s, it was another opportunity to give back,” he said. “I am in a better place for what I want to accomplish.”Kloski said she was proud of the leader she was able to become while at Saint Mary’s.“Be strong and bold,” she said. “Set goals for yourself and become successful.”Tags: Diversity, latinos, panel, saint mary’s, Week of Poderlast_img read more

New rectors take charge at seven halls

first_imgThe new academic year brings with it many changes in dorm life. In addition to the opening of Dunne and Flaherty Halls, seven residence halls are welcoming new rectors this year. The seven new rectors, who will oversee and guide residential life, are Allyse Gruslin of Ryan Hall, Fr. Matthew Hovde of Zahm House, Zachary Imfeld of Morrissey Manor, Justin McDevitt of Stanford Hall, Fr. Christopher Rehagen of of O’Neill Hall, Rachelle Simon of Lewis Hall and Eric Styles of Carroll Hall.Gruslin, a native of Rhode Island and the recipient of a Master of Divinity from Notre Dame, said her desire to become a rector came from her experiences as an assistant rector (AR) in Lyons Hall last year.“I moved in Lyons, and I realized it was a wonderful experience, spending time with the women, getting to know them, just hanging out with them,” Gruslin said. “I knew there was something special about this ministry.”This desire to serve as a rector grew throughout Gruslin’s time at Lyons, she said.“It became this thing I felt like I had to try,” Gruslin said. “I knew this was something God was calling me to do.”Hovde, a Holy Cross priest who holds a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Notre Dame, has previously served as an AR for Sorin College and has worked in Campus Ministry and at the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). He was recently ordained a Holy Cross priest in April.Imfeld said becoming a rector was a long-term goal.“Being a rector has been a dream of mine since I was a freshman [at the University of Portland],” Imfeld said. “I just saw what the rector position was and thought it’d be a really cool opportunity for me to serve a great place like Notre Dame.”Imfeld said he hopes to help foster personal growth among the residents of Morrissey Hall.“I think [being a rector] is about getting to know the guys and spend time with them and help them to grow into the men that God is calling them to be,” Imfeld said.McDevitt, who recently graduated with a master’s degree in political science from Notre Dame, worked in places from Mexico, where he served on mission trips, to Iraq, where he served as a government contractor. In his time studying at Notre Dame, McDevitt was involved heavily with chorale. In an email, he said he felt a calling to be a rector after teaching political science at the University and wants to help Stanford Hall men become role models for living a good life. “Working with the incredible students here changed my life and made me understand that my calling is to serve and love and live for students,” he said. “I think a lot of other people knew I was meant to be a rector before I did because I had such a heart for teaching, but instead of politics I’ll just be teaching life. I constantly refer to being a rector as ‘my new life’ because that’s exactly what it is for me.”Rehagen, a 2009 graduate of Notre Dame and a Holy Cross priest, most recently served as a deacon and parochial vicar at Christ the King parish in South Bend.  He said his own experience in Alumni Hall made him want to “pay it forward”, and that he looked forward to working with the men of O’Neill Hall. “I know the guys are full of good ideas and hopefully we’ll put some of those in practice,” he said. Styles has a background in both church service and the arts, graduating from the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music. He has served as the parish liturgy coordinator at Saint Benedict the African East Catholic Church in Chicago. He said he was excited to be part of Carroll Hall’s tight-knit community; when he arrived over the summer, he fielded a steady stream of hall residents and alumni visiting to welcome him. “I was greeted by a student from Carroll the first day I got here,” he said. “The rumor mill worked, they found out I was working on campus, and a current student came by looking for me. They continued to come by over the first two weeks and just continued to show up.” Simon spent many years serving in a variety of organizations, including the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Campus Ministry at Boston College and the St. Louis Arc, which helps those with developmental disabilities. Simon did not attend Notre Dame, and said being a newcomer provides unique new challenges.“I think for me, because I’m new to all things Notre Dame, my biggest challenges will be learning at rapid speed, the culture of Notre Dame,” Simon said.  “So everything from the phrases, and the way the people know the campus really well.”Simon said she is excited to become a part of the Notre Dame community. “It just seemed like a great fit,” she said. “I prayed about it a lot, and what it means, in terms of building Christian community, and get[ting] to be a pastoral presence, I’m really excited about it. I think it’s just a really important time in people’s lives, in students lives, it’s a great time to be figuring out who you are and who God is, and about the world and what you’re going to do to contribute.”Associate news editor Emily McConville contributed to this report. Tags: Freshman Orientation 2016, new rectors, rectorslast_img read more

Saint Mary’s to host Meet Me at the Avenue Sunday

first_imgSaint Mary’s will be hosting its annual Meet Me at the Avenue event for students admitted to the Class of 2022 students Sunday.Campus visit coordinator Bekah Stanton said in an email that the event aims to experience Saint Mary’s as a potential student.“It’s intended to give accepted students an opportunity to meet other members of their class, learn more about the College and discover if Saint Mary’s is the place they’re going to call home,” she said.Stanton said they are expecting about 250 students, and 650 guests including family members.The event opens with several talks, for both students and parents together and separate, Stanton said.“The day will begin with remarks by various individuals, including Saint Mary’s College President, Jan Cervelli,” Stanton said. “Following that, the students will branch off to a segment in the residence halls while the parents will remain in the auditorium and hear from current students and their parents on a panel. The entire group will also have the opportunity to hear from a recent alumna about her experience at Saint Mary’s.”Attendees will then have the opportunity to explore campus, she said.“Prospective students and their families will then experience lunch in the dining hall, participate in campus tours and take part in an open house,” Stanton said. “Faculty from each department and club leaders are some of the individuals who will be present during this time. Following this, we offer students and their families the option to go to Mass in the Church of Loretto.”There will also be new events added to the schedule, including showcasing the renovated Angela Athletic & Wellness Complex, she said.“The open house location has changed to the new Angela Athletic & Wellness Complex this year,” Stanton said. “This will allow us to showcase our amazing new space. Because Angela [Athletic & Wellness Complex] is also being dedicated this weekend, we’ve invited students to participate in various activities within the dedication celebration, including workout classes and panel discussions.”She also said admissions is introducing a session for Spanish-speaking families, aimed to help ease their transition into college.“New this year, we will also be hosting a College 101 for ‘Spanish Speaking Families,’” Stanton said. “This will involve a question and answer session with representatives from the office of admission, financial aid and multicultural services, all of whom speak Spanish fluently. It will also include a current parent and current students who will provide examples of what helped them through their first-year transition.”Stanton said Meet Me at the Avenue allows prospective students to get any last-minute questions they may have answered.“Whether their questions pertain to a specific major, about college requirements, or about life on campus, there will be individuals present to answer all,” she said.Stanton said she believes this event is an important opportunity for prospective students to visit the campus.“This is a great way for students to get on campus, meet their potential classmates and discover if they picture themselves at Saint Mary’s,” she said. “We also have a beautiful campus, and I think it’s important for students to visit and see this beauty firsthand. Prospective students are also able to interact with many of our current students during the event, giving them a good indication of the types of great women we have here.”Tags: angela athletic and wellness complex, Class of 2022, Meet Me at the Avenue, Saint Mary’s Admissionslast_img read more

Notre Dame valedictorian, Marshall Scholarship recipient shares philosophy, passions

first_imgWhen senior Sofia Carozza first arrived on campus, she knew she wanted to take as many risks as she could, especially if those risks scared her. This journey is what led her to shave her head for The Bald and the Beautiful, join Women’s Boxing and participate in Show Some Skin, among other activities.It also may have led her into some of her accomplishments. Carozza was named valedictorian for the class of 2019 and in December she was named a recipient of the Marshall Scholarship. In the fall, Carozza will head to University of Cambridge in England to pursue a Ph.D.“The only thing I knew I wanted to do when I got here was take as many risks as I could,” she said. “Basically anytime I heard something that someone else was doing and my first reaction was, ‘Oh, that scares me,’ that meant I had to do it.”A self-described nerd, Carozza said she has always been interested in mental health and how the brain works, partially due to her own experiences with mental illness. This interest took form at Notre Dame as she chose to major in neuroscience and behavior with a supplementary theology minor as well as a minor in philosophy, politics and economics.“I’ve always been fascinated by the human person and human behavior in particular,” Carozza said. “During high school I suffered from mental illness, … and several people who are dear to me either experienced trauma in their childhood or suffered from mental illness. So, it was really a way for me to look at the way that biology interacts with human experience to make us into who we are and to come to terms with the fact that who we are today is a product of our experience over a lifetime.”Carozza is a Hesburgh-Yusko Scholar, a Glynn Family Honors Scholar and a de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture Sorin Fellow, but she said her community involvement has made the biggest impact in her life at Notre Dame. Carozza has spent her summers dedicated to the cause, tutoring children with developmental disabilities and psychiatric disorders in Paraguay, researching effects of stress on the brain and implementing ideas of community-based change in South Bend and beyond. “I do some work with the juvenile justice center, and I’ve been involved with the Catholic Worker, and I’ve volunteered for several community organizations that do mental health related stuff for early childhood development stuff,” she said. “Those relationships with community members have really transformed the way that I think about my education and the potential and the responsibility that I have to put it in the service of other people, not just in some abstract future, but right now.”Carozza is a South Bend native and has lived there her whole life. Still, Carozza didn’t see herself coming to Notre Dame. During decision season she was choosing between two schools — Harvard and Notre Dame. She said she chose Notre Dame because of the care she saw professors take with their jobs and their students. “I went abroad my junior year of high school,” Carozza said. “After getting back, I was pretty sure that I wanted to go somewhere that wasn’t in South Bend because I had experienced more of a cosmopolitan city life, and I really wanted to pop the bubble a little bit. But it was over the course of my senior year when I realized that the things that were most meaningful to me were the relationships I had with really caring mentors and experiences that really helped me grow as a person. “When I came here to visit, I was really blown away by the mission of the University and how that’s enacted on a personal level — that the professors are really here because they care about us and that students are looked at as their whole person. [They’re helped] to develop into who they’re called to be and how they’re called to serve the world.”Looking forward, Carozza said she would love to return to Notre Dame’s campus to teach.“I’d love to be back here at Notre Dame,” she said. “I love this community, and I think that the role of a professor in my life has been absolutely transformative — to have mentors who can educate me as a scholar, but also accompany me as a person to my fulfillment.”For right now, however, Carozza said she is taking some time off.“This summer I’m going backpacking some places. I’m going to pilgrimage to Our Lady of Guadalupe, and then I’m going to be spending the rest of the summer working on a farm in northern Colorado,” Carozza said. “I’m so excited to just be immersed in silence. I do best when I’m alone in a place that’s beautiful and I can read and write, so that’s my happy place.”There were times she questioned her decision to attend Notre Dame during her first couple years, Carozza said. But by now she knows she made the right choice. “Really reflecting on everything that’s happened to these past four years and all of the relationships that I’ve grown to have, I cannot imagine having made a different choice precisely because I’m a very different person than I was in high school. I’ve grown and been formed a lot, and I have a deep faith now and an awareness of who I am and what I’m called to do,” Carozza said. “Honestly I can’t imagine it having come as easily at a place other than Notre Dame.”Tags: 2019 commencement address, Commencement 2019, Marshall Scholarship, Notre Dame valedictorian, Sofia Carozzalast_img read more

Saint Mary’s hosts programming for peer mentorship program

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Belles celebrated their across-the street neighbors Monday as they gathered to view the Notre Dame Irish Football game as a part of their Big Belle Little Belle event. According to club representatives, about 289 students have signed up for the peer mentorship program. The program partners a freshman or sophomore belle or, “little Belle,” with an upperclassman “big Belle” with intentions to facilitate friendship and mentorship. The game watch party was the first event of the year for the group.For some students, the Big Belle Little Belle experience can operate as a sort of pseudo-sorority. The Saint Mary’s students often speak on the values of sisterhood, and often refer to themselves as if they are one big sorority. The EMX logo on sweatshirts, pants and t-shirts, which imitates popular sorority culture, can be spotted around campus. Members of Big Belle Little Belle is sometimes seen as a substitute for Greek life by first-years and the club’s facilitators.“I think the sisterhood is really important, because we don’t have sororities,” Saint Mary’s senior and Big Belle Little Belle co-chair Moira LeMay said. “And I think a lot of girls want a sorority, but they don’t want the dues of a sorority or the commitments of the sorority. And this is one on such a small scale — by no means is it a sorority — but it’s a way for girls to feel like they have like an inner circle with people that they wouldn’t normally have.”LeMay pointed out the absence of dues as a reason for Belles to join, but the club did recently require a 10 dollar fee.“It is to pay for t-shirts,” LeMay said. “So girls can have the nice t-shirt, and we don’t have to worry about our annual budget. And we can put more into our activities, if we aren’t concerned about t-shirts. It’s something that we’re doing different this year, just because of the amount of girls that we have.”The appeal of meeting people and getting involved was a large driving force for first-year Caroline Jakalski making an appearance at the event.“I just signed up because I thought it’d be cool. [In a] small college, you don’t have sororities, but it’s like kind of like a sorority, so you have a big and stuff,” Jakalski said. “I decided that it’s a good way to get involved, especially freshman year not knowing a lot of people.”This year, Saint Mary’s’ Student Government Association and Big Belle Little Belle is reformatting the selection process to more closely that of a sorority. In years past, the board assigned “littles” and “bigs” based on things such as majors.“We’re going to do a ‘pref’ night this year to take away from having the committee chairs and the committee decide for students,” LeMay said. “We’re going to allow the big to choose their little.”The game watch is an event aimed at allowing bigs and the littles to get to know each other to facilitate the selection process.“It’s up to the bigs and littles who attend these events to connect with one another [and] get to know one another,” LeMay said. “So then they’re like, ‘OK, this is a good relationship,’ rather than, ‘Well, you randomly paired me with somebody,’ and think, ‘I’m not happy.’”LeMay said the organizers will step in if a little does not get appropriately matched with a big. Despite the changes and the movement towards sorority culture, the motives for the organization is the same: They seek to give younger students an opportunity to feel comfortable and welcomed on campus and to provide them with guidance, LeMay said.These events led toward reveal day when bigs will pick their littles.“Yeah, we are really excited for reveal day that will be on October 6,” LeMay said. “… That’s our biggest event of the year. We put the most money towards it — funding, activities, all of that. Reveal day [is] when our bigs reveal themselves to their littles. Last year, it was a lot of fun, but we’re hoping to be bigger and bolder. And our theme this year is Disney.”Big Belle Little Belle extends beyond the structured events and into everyday life and relationships. The organization encourages the students to participate and extend their relationships beyond the bigger all-club event.“We really tell girls, you make it what you want,” LeMay said. “So like my little and I, we do homework together. She comes and hangs out at my apartment with me. We do a lot together. But we also provide non-event events. So it’s not something as big as game day or reveal day. But it’s like, ‘Hey, if anyone wants to go.’”For first-year Hannah Shoemake, this guidance is why she is seeking out a relationship with a big.“I think, when adjusting to the college life, having a big sister figure is really gonna help me through some tough times,” Shoemake said.Tags: big little, saint mary’s, Sisterhoodlast_img read more

WATCH: Fredonia High School Band Virtually Play Together

first_imgApp users, tap here to watch video.FREDONIA – While social distancing is keeping many physically apart, it’s not stopping a local band from playing together.The Fredonia High School Symphonic Band put together a virtual fight song.In total, 58 members of the 2019-20 band can be seen playing together in the video above, provided by Fredonia Central School District teacher Andy Bennett. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Tom Conti on Losing His Tony & Starring in London’s Twelve Angry Men

first_img Which, presumably, you did? Yes, our producer Bill Kenwright said I should go and see the play—I got a real rush out of it and thought it would be very good fun to be in. As I was coming out of the door of the theater, the phone rang and it was Bill saying, “Well?”, and I said, “Let’s have a go”—and opened three weeks later [laughs]. Despite achieving renown in the U.S., you’ve kept London as home. There were two points in my life where I did consider uprooting the family to the States—the first was around the time of the play in New York, but I didn’t know America well enough and I was concerned about my daughter, Nina, who was five at the time and so at the point of starting serious school. It’s Tony Award season at the moment on Broadway. Do you recall much of your own Tony experience? I remember it very well; it was a hugely exciting night! The curious thing was that until I got to New York, I had never heard of the Tonys and then someone said, “You’ve been nominated for a Tony,” and I said, “That’s very nice, what is it?” and I was told and realized that this was really something—and didn’t expect for a moment to win. It’s been 35 years since Tom Conti won a Tony Award for his career-defining performance in Whose Life Is It Anyway?, followed five years later by his Oscar-nominated star turn in Reuben, Reuben. Since then, the 72-year-old actor has romanced Pauline Collins on screen in Shirley Valentine and done time in Gotham City in The Dark Knight Rises, in addition to returning regularly to the London stage. This season, he can be found succeeding Martin Shaw as Juror No. 8 in the extended run of Twelve Angry Men at the Garrick Theatre, alongside Jeff Fahey and Robert Vaughn. Broadway.com caught up with the ever-charming Scotsman to talk takeovers, Tonys, and sustaining a career. What’s interesting about your role as a bed-ridden quadriplegic in Whose Life Is It Anyway? is that the part went on to be played by women—Mary Tyler Moore and later, Kim Cattrall. That idea came from a conversation [London co-star] Jane Asher and I had had in London where she said, “Why don’t we swap sometimes and I can go in the bed and you can be the doctor?” And I thought, “That’s a truly wonderful idea!” Our director gave us that look of “How bloody stupid can actors be!?” What appeals to you about Reginald Rose’s writing? To me, what’s strange and wonderful about this is that it’s actually a feel-good play: it’s a play about heroism, in a way, and one man’s dogged resistance to apathy and hatred. Audiences always respond to the notion of one guy against the world: That’s the stuff of classic drama. Do you keep the trophy on display? Funny you should mention that. My housekeeper likes to move things around, so I’m not sure what ledge it’s on at the moment; I must check. Welcome back to the West End! You’re replacing Martin Shaw in the leading role—has it been a steep learning curve? It has been, and I’m not sure I would do it again, though I took over once before [from the late Peter O’Toole in Jeffrey Bernard is Unwell] so I know how these things work. The only reason to do it is if you really want to. You could still do it in a few years. We’ll see, though as I get older, I do think L.A. would be a nice place to be. I’ve always liked working in America. There always seem to be all sorts of possibilities there, especially now that your country produces some really stunningly good TV. But the gender change happened nonetheless. It did because they couldn’t get anyone to take over from me and then the idea of [the role] being a woman re-emerged. Mary [Tyler Moore] came to see it and immediately said yes she’d like to do it. She was wonderful in the part and tremendously courageous. It was terribly exciting for me to see her do it because I’d been in love with Mary Tyler Moore for years—as we all were. You got a real taste of the movie blockbuster world with The Dark Knight Rises. That felt ginormous, no doubt about it. One doesn’t often work on movies of that size. I remember going to work in the morning thinking that this must have been what it was like in the old days of Hollywood where you had to go to an ocean to have an ocean. So much now happens via CGI, but Chris [Nolan, director] prefers to work on a huge scale that really is quite astounding. And the other? 10 years ago, my wife and I had pretty well decided to buy a house in L.A. and get green cards and just when all that was happening, suddenly my daughter was married and pregnant, so everything just stopped. We thought, we can’t go away and leave her with a new baby coming. So in both cases, my daughter was the determining factor! That’s unusual—any idea why that might be? It’s partly because the British do so much capital-A acting when they take on Shakespeare. It’s such a relief when you see people like Kevin Kline or Meryl Streep doing Shakespeare. They’re sensational because they can just talk whereas the British too often act Shakespeare, and I run screaming from the exit. Amid so varied a career, you haven’t done that much of the bread-and-butter of many a British actor’s life: Shakespeare. That’s true. I was in Julie Taymor’s film of The Tempest but the truth is that every time I think I would like to do a Shakespeare, I realize that for myself I get far more pleasure from reading Shakespeare than from watching it. View Commentslast_img read more