Kansas once more favored to win 15th straight Big 12 title

first_imgGretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college They’re also driven to knock the Jayhawks from their lofty perch in the Big 12.As the league prepares to open its double-round-robin slate next week, here are some story lines:RED RAIDERS RISING: Chris Beard’s team was supposed to take a step back after losing All-Big 12 guard Keenan Evans and freshman standout Zhaire Smith to the pros. But sophomore Jarrett Culver has been playing like an All-American and the Red Raiders have shut down just about everyone they’ve played, even causing the Blue Devils problems in their game at Madison Square Garden.HEALTHY CYCLONES: Iowa State’s only losses have come to Arizona and Iowa, and neither of those is particularly damaging. Marial Shayok has flourished, averaging more than 20 points, and now he’s got a couple of running mates to take off some of the scoring pressure. Wigginton is back from his foot issue and Solomon from a groin injury that sidelined both the first two months of the season.TOUGH TCU: It didn’t take long for Jamie Dixon to turn around TCU, and now the Horned Frogs (11-1) think they can compete for a Big 12 title. They had an early slip-up against Lipscomb but breezed past the rest of their nonconference schedule, winning the Diamond Head Classic earlier this week.SOONERS OR LATER: Lon Kruger has had plenty of teams capable of giving Kansas a run for Big 12 superiority, but this one is putting together a sneak attack. Christian James and No. 25 Oklahoma (11-1) have quietly had one of the better nonconference runs, their only loss coming against Wisconsin.BUMPY COUNTRY ROADS: West Virginia (7-4) returned plenty of talent from last season, including Esa Ahmad and Sagabe Konate. But little has gone right for the Mountaineers, beginning with an early loss to Buffalo and defeats to Western Kentucky, Florida and Rhode Island. LATEST STORIES Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil After winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Arizona State guard Rob Edwards, left, knocks the ball away from Kansas guard Quentin Grimes during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018, in Tempe, Ariz. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri)LAWRENCE, Kan. — There have been plenty of times over the past 14 years that Kansas was supposed to have a tough test in the Big 12, only for the Jayhawks to emerge on top when March rolled around.The year Texas had Kevin Durant, or Oklahoma boasted Buddy Hield. The years that Jayhawks coach Bill Self had to replace all five of his starters, or that some other up-and-coming program was stocked with the kind of talent that Kansas seems to get every season.ADVERTISEMENT Phivolcs: Slim probability of Taal Volcano caldera eruption Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum Ginebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup title This was not supposed to be one of those years.Yes, the Jayhawks lost their entire backcourt of Devonte Graham, Svi Mykhailiuk and Malik Newman to the NBA. And yes, rival Kansas State returned almost its entire roster from a team that went to the Elite Eight last year, giving the Wildcats a real feeling of confidence heading into the season.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissBut the Jayhawks merely restocked with a bevy of high-profile transfers and five-star recruits, and the result was a No. 1 ranking that they held through much of the nonconference slate. It wasn’t until this past weekend against Arizona State that they lost their first game — without injured big man Udoka Azubuike — that they dropped further than second in the AP poll.Now, the fourth-ranked Jayhawks (10-1) have a final tuneup Saturday against Eastern Michigan before setting their sights on an unprecedented 15th consecutive conference championship. MOST READ “The reality of it is we weren’t going to run the table,” Self said. “Let’s not get carried away, and I hate saying this — you never want to lose — but certainly you’d rather learn from a nonconference loss than a conference loss, so hopefully we get something from (the loss to Arizona State). I think it’s a teaching moment.”Meanwhile, the Jayhawks might have much more competition in the Big 12 than previously thought.The Wildcats (9-2) are coming off an impressive win over Vanderbilt despite losing preseason player of the year Dean Wade to a foot injury. No. 11 Texas Tech (11-1) leads the nation in adjusted defensive efficiency and just gave Duke all it could handle. Iowa State (10-2) got Lindell Wigginton and Solomon Young back from injuries last week and has shown plenty in their absence.“We’ve got good players,” Kansas State coach Bruce Weber said. “If you think about it, Dean was the only underclassman on the first team All-Big 12 last year, and Barry (Brown) was second team. So two underclassmen in an unbelievable league, probably the toughest league I’ve been a part of.“To me,” Weber said, “I don’t think we’ve gotten as much recognition as we should. But I don’t think they care. They’re just driven to be good players and that’s important for me.”ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Cristiano Ronaldo speaks out on racism after chants aimed at Kalidou Koulibaly Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. ‘Mia’: Rom-com with a cause a career-boosting showcase for Coleen Garcia Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes00:50Trending Articles02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award No.13 lucky for Orlando Bloom View commentslast_img read more

Book Review Leeza Gibbons Take 2 Your Guide To Happy Endings And

first_imgLeeza Gibbons is no stranger to new beginnings, and in her new book – Take 2: Your Guide To Happy Endings and New Beginnings – she explains just how you can take control and live life to your rules.Leeza Gibbons Take 2“If you could hit the reset button and start over, would you? I did and I’ve found anytime is a good time for a re-do! That’s why I am so excited to tell you about the release of my brand new book, Take 2: Your Guide to Creating Happy Endings and New Beginnings,” she says about Take 2. “This is more than a book to me. It’s a chance for me to share my life and the lessons I have learned with you in hopes that you’ll be inspired, encouraged and empowered enough to realize that if this is not the life you ordered, you can always call for a TAKE 2!”Known for her work as TV host extraordinaire and founder of the Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation, Leeza has led a fascinating life that has twisted and turned as she constantly reinvented herself. And in Take 2, Leeza leads us through some of the decisions that peppered her journey from a small town in South Carolina to superstardom in Hollywood, from devoted mother and wife to Alzheimer’s caregiver. Along the way she recounts encounters with Olivia Newton-John, Jamie Lee Curtis, Maria Shriver, Jessica Biel and many other stars she was able to draw inspiration from.“The book is really for anyone who wants to head in a new direction,” she says. “If you got divorced, depressed, fired or maybe you’ve gained weight – I’ll help you begin again. If you feel stuck or if you’ve just lost your way, TAKE 2 will help you get back on track and will remind you that this is YOUR life and it should be lived by YOUR rules!”Primarily aimed at women, Take 2 is also an important read for men who want to reboot their lives, or feel the need to better understand their partners. It is a book that can be read from cover-to-cover or dipped into on days when life is just not going the way you planned it. And with sections on change, how to look and feel good, and letting the spirit soar, Take 2 is a book that massages the soul and shows you how to live life by your rules.Leeza Gibbon’s Take 2 can be ordered at Amazon.com and Amazon.co.uk.Copyright ©2013Look to the Starslast_img read more

14 MILLION VIEWERS IN FIRST WEEK MAKE CTVS CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED JANN THE

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement TORONTO (March 27, 2019) – Following its premiere last Wednesday (March 20), CTV confirmed today its new original comedy series JANN is the most-watched Canadian comedy this broadcast year. Following five days of PVR playback, the premiere episode of JANN currently has a cumulative average audience of 1.4 million viewers so far for its premiere and weekend encore broadcast (March 23). Building on its Wednesday night success on CTV, the episode has reached 2.8 million Canadians across all airings. It’s the biggest Canadian comedy debut since CTV’s THE INDIAN DETECTIVE starring Russell Peters.Becoming Bell Media’s most successful digital premiere to date, the debut episode of JANN was available during an extensive 16-day preview on multiple platforms including CTV.ca, CTV On Demand, Crave, CTV’s YouTube page, and more.“We’re delighted Canadians are responding to the comedic brilliance of Jann Arden with such enthusiasm,” said Executive Producer and Bell Media President Randy Lennox. “We’re thrilled that JANN gets funnier with each and every episode!” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook The series continues tonight (March 27) with the new episode “Go with the Flowga” at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV.ca, the CTV App, and Crave. At the same time, series star Jann Arden takes to the Canadian Screen Award stage tonight to host the CTV Gala Honouring Creative Fiction Storytelling, streaming live for free on CTV.ca and the CTV app beginning at 7 p.m. ET.JANN premiered to critical acclaim and social media buzz, including 25 million total potential impressions during the March 20 premiere, with #JANNonCTV trending on Twitter in Canada during the premiere episode.*What fans are saying on Twitter:@TorrensJonathan – Great debut @jannarden! Solid jokes + physical comedy + self-deprecation = All the makings of a hit! Congrats to you and your crew. #jannonctv #[email protected] – #JANNonCTV So funny. Thank you @jannarden and congratulations on a great [email protected] – #JannOnCTV @jannarden OMG I can’t stop [email protected] – We are laughing so hard! Loooooving it!!!! #JANNonCTVIn tonight’s new episode, Jann (Jann Arden) is recording a “We Are the World”- style charity song about empowering young women. But when she learns she has merely a small part in the chorus of the single, with her voice drowned out by other singers, Jann demands a full solo part in the song. And she doesn’t care which of her managers, new or old, helps her get it! This episode guest stars Canadian singer and multi-instrumentalist Kiesza.Encore presentations of JANN air Saturdays at 8 p.m. ET/PT on CTV.About JANNSet and filmed in Calgary, JANN was co-developed by Bell Media and Project 10 Productions and is produced in association with Project 10 Productions and Seven24 Films.JANN is executive produced by Andrew Barnsley and Ben Murray for Project 10 Productions, and Tom Cox and Jordy Randall for Seven24 Films. Jann Arden, Leah Gauthier, and Jennica Harper created the series and will also serve as Executive Producers with Jennica Harper Showrunning. For Bell Media, Chris Kelley is Production Executive; Sarah Fowlie is Director, Comedy Original Programming; Corrie Coe is Senior Vice-President, Original Programming. Pat DiVittorio is Vice-President, CTV and Specialty Programming. Mike Cosentino is President, Content and Programming, Bell Media. Randy Lennox is President, Bell Media.center_img Login/Register With: Jann Arden Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

How A MultipleChoice Test Became A Fixture Of The NFL Draft

But before we get there, let’s first look at what the Wonderlic purportedly tests. “What we’re measuring is not what you know — that’s what’s being measured on the ACT or the SAT,” said Charles Wonderlic, president and CEO of Wonderlic Inc. “This is really saying, ‘How quickly does your brain gather and analyze information?’” The 12-minute Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT) features 50 questions arranged by difficulty, lowest to highest. Here’s a sample:Jose’s monthly parking fee for April was $150; for May it was $10 more than April; and for June $40 more than May. His average monthly parking fee was ___ for these 3 months?J) $66K) $160L) $166M) $170N) $2002The answer: M) $170A player’s Wonderlic score is always a number between 1 and 50, and across all professions, the average score is approximately 21. (Systems analysts and Chemists top the scale 32 at 31, respectively.) For pro football players, the oft-cited number is about 20. Tracking down the average scores by position is tricky, mainly because the buttoned-up NFL isn’t interested in sharing any broad Wonderlic data. In an email, Charles Wonderlic said that while his company has published “norms” for other industries, “we maintain the confidentiality of test scores for single organizations. Since the NFL is the only client by which we can produce a quarterback average, we would need their permission to provide this information. Traditionally, the NFL prefers to keep any information about tests scores internal to their own organization.”Like Wonderlic, Inc., the NFL declined to provide any historical data related to NFL players’ test scores for this piece.For his 19843The first edition of the book was published in 1970. classic “The New Thinking Man’s Guide to Pro Football,” Sports Illustrated writer Paul “Dr. Z” Zimmerman did get one anonymous staffer to spill some then-current averages. Offensive tackles led the way at 26, then came centers (25), quarterbacks (24), offensive guards (23), tight ends (22), safeties and middle linebackers (21), defensive linemen and outside linebackers (19), cornerbacks (18), wide receivers and fullbacks (17), and halfbacks (16). And what about place kickers and punters? “Who cares?” the source said.On its own, a solid Wonderlic score means little. Like a 40-yard dash time, it provides one tiny, standardized data point to employers who presumably take a holistic approach to hiring. But because teams have decades of data on file, they can compare the Wonderlic scores of current college players entering the draft to those of past prospects. “They simply use it to find the extremes,” Foster said. A very low score or a very high score, he added, could lead teams to conduct more testing or look into the prospect more closely.“Wonderlic gives you an area to investigate,” the late New York Giants general manager George Young told the Philadelphia Daily News in 1997. “If a guy doesn’t have a good score on the test, you don’t say he’s not smart. But you go in and investigate and find out [why he scored low]. You go in and talk to his coach. You find out how he did in school. You find out how he retains. If you think he’s a poor reader and did poorly because it was a verbal test, you give him a non-verbal test.”The most famous extreme occurred in 1975, when Harvard receiver and punter Pat McInally4McInally’s post-NFL life has been much more interesting than his football career. He’s the guy who invented Starting Lineup action figures. reportedly scored a perfect 50 on the Wonderlic. The Cincinnati Bengals picked him in the fifth round of that year’s draft, but not before his reputed intelligence reportedly scared some teams away. In 2011, McInally told the Los Angeles Times that Young informed him that acing the Wonderlic “may have cost you a few rounds in the draft because we don’t like extremes. We don’t want them too dumb and we sure as hell don’t want them too smart.”That slightly paleolithic line of thinking, however, wasn’t shared by everyone. “I don’t care about that stuff,” the late Raiders owner Al Davis said in “The New Thinking Man’s Guide to Pro Football.” “If a kid is street smart, that’s enough. Our coaches’ job is to make a kid smarter. I just wonder if they checked some of the coaches’ IQs around the league, how high they’d score.”By now, the value of the Wonderlic has been debated so vigorously, especially among NFL executives, that it’s easy to forget that the test wasn’t designed for football. But the Wonderlic is not without its detractors. Charles Wonderlic estimated that since the test’s inception nearly 80 years ago, it has faced legal scrutiny hundreds of times.In the summer of 1965, when the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission began operations a year after it was established by the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Duke Power Company in Draper, North Carolina, began allowing its black employees to work in its higher-paying divisions. Until that point, black employees had only been permitted to work in the low-paying Labor department. Duke Power also instituted a policy that required all new applicants6Duke Power started permitting current employees without a high school degree to transfer to higher-paying departments in September of 1965, but to do so they still had to pass two aptitude tests. to have a high school diploma and pass two aptitude exams: the Bennett Mechanical Comprehension Test and the Wonderlic Personnel Test.These measures crippled the efforts of black workers to advance. At the time, the percentage of white men who both possessed a high school diploma and were able to pass the two aptitude tests was significantly higher7According to the 1960 North Carolina census, 34 percent of white men had a high school diploma while only 12 percent of black men had the same level of education. The newly formed Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found that in this case, 58 percent of white people and only 6 percent of black people who took the Wonderlic and the Bennett tests passed. than the percentage of black men who met the same criteria.Griggs v. Duke Power Co., a U.S. Supreme Court case argued in 1970, condemned the company’s requirements. Not only did they disproportionately affect black workers, but they also failed to show “a demonstrable relationship” to job performance, Chief Justice Warren Burger wrote in the majority opinion. He also noted that nothing in the Civil Rights Act “precludes the use of testing or measuring procedures; obviously they are useful.”While the Wonderlic test has shown itself to be a useful tool for workplace assessment, it has also faced longstanding criticism from those who argue that it is racially and culturally biased. It’s unclear whether the NFL, a league in which more than 67 percent of players are African-American, agrees with those accusations or if the league actually uses the Wonderlic to make personnel decisions.“How determinative it is depends on the club,” former Giants general manager Ernie Accorsi told ESPN.com in 2013, “but it’s usually not ‘the’ determinative factor.”When it comes to football, is the test a demonstrably reasonable measure of job performance? Because official NFL Wonderlic scores aren’t publicly available, it’s difficult to know for sure, but that hasn’t stopped researchers from attempting to find out. Brian D. Lyons, Brian J. Hoffman, and John W. Michel8At the time, Lyons, Hoffman and Michel were working at University of California, Fresno, the University of Georgia and Towson University, respectively co-authored a 2009 study examining the reported9They found the scores on NFLDraftScout.com and CBS.Sportsline.com. Wonderlic scores of 762 NFL players from three draft classes. They found that there was little correlation between Wonderlic scores and on-field performance, except for two positions: Tight ends and defensive backs with low scores actually played better than those with high scores. The researchers surmised that this “could be explained by the notion that performance for these positions entails more of an emphasis on physical ability and instinct” than general mental ability.Today, the NFL continues to ask potential draftees to take the Wonderlic, although the test now has company. In 2013, the league introduced the Player Assessment Tool, which was developed by attorney Cyrus Mehri, whose report led to the implementation of the NFL’s Rooney Rule, and psychology professor Harold Goldstein. Louis Bien of SB Nation recently reported that the PAT is a 50-minute exam that examines a player’s football smarts, psychological attributes, learning style and motivational cues. “Players are not given a numeric score, unlike on the Wonderlic, so technically there is no way to do poorly on it,” Bien wrote.Mehri’s hope is that the new test can measure what the Wonderlic can’t. “This kind of levels the playing field from a socio-economic point of view,” he told USA Today. “A lot of guys may be very intelligent, but are not as book-smart as others. Someone may not be the best reader, but they can still be very smart in picking up things.”As long as the Wonderlic is administered at the NFL Scouting Combine, Foster, the Combine director, will be fielding questions about it — and shaking his head at leaked scores. “It has some value,” he said of the test. “It does not have near the value of what we spend talking about it between February and May.”After all, a high or low score won’t automatically doom or anoint a prospect. Just ask Greg McElroy. After doing exceptionally well on the Wonderlic in 2011, the New York Jets picked the quarterback in the seventh round of the draft. Before announcing his retirement in 2014, he played in a total of two NFL games. What it was designed for was something more basic. In the 1930s, Eldon “E.F.” Wonderlic — friends called him Al — was working as the director of personnel at consumer loan provider Household Finance Corporation.5It’s now called HSBC Finance. His employer was looking for a more efficient way to hire entry-level workers at its branches, so it sent Wonderlic to graduate school at Northwestern in hopes that his research would yield a solution to the problem.E.F. Wonderlic acknowledged that the single best predictor of job performance was previous work experience. But as Charles Wonderlic put it: “How do you predict someone’s performance if they have never done that job before?” The second-best predictor of job performance, E.F. Wonderlic reasoned, was cognitive ability.“What he found was that different jobs had different cognitive demands ranging from very low to very high,” said Charles Wonderlic, E.F.’s grandson. “And there were really distinct IQs around each job. And the further away you got from that distribution, that’s when you started to experience problems.”The original Wonderlic Personnel Test was born out of that theory. The first copyrighted version of the test appeared in 1937. Its brevity and simple scoring system, Charles Wonderlic said, allowed virtually any manager to both administer the test and interpret scores. (This is also the likely reason for modern pundits’ love of Wonderlic scores: They’re easy talking points.)After a stretch at Douglas Aircraft Corporation during World War II, E.F. Wonderlic worked in finance and sold copies of his test. He didn’t advertise, but eventually big companies like Spiegel and AT&T started calling. In 1961, E.F. Wonderlic left his job as president of General Finance Corporation and founded E.F. Wonderlic & Associates. By then, Charles Wonderlic said, an estimated 4 million people a year were taking the WPT.In the early 1960s, Gil Brandt was a young scout with the expansion Dallas Cowboys. “We were not a very good team,” he told me. His bosses, general manager Tex Schramm and coach Tom Landry, were looking for ways to change that. After doing some research, Brandt said that the trio determined that successful businesses used the Wonderlic and the team should, too. It’s unclear exactly when the Cowboys began testing players. Brandt did say that at some point during the ’60s, he remembers watching spring practice at Northwestern and then stopping by the Wonderlic headquarters to learn more about the company.By the late ’60s, George Young was an ambitious personnel assistant for the Baltimore Colts. He’d been a public school teacher before transitioning to football full time, and he asked the head of the guidance department in Baltimore for a handful of different tests to peruse. Of the 10 he reportedly looked at, the Wonderlic stuck out, and soon the Colts began using it.Other teams followed suit by the 1970s, and the NFL eventually began to use it to assess college players en masse. Since 2007, Wonderlic, Inc. staff members have traveled annually to Indianapolis to administer the test at the Scouting Combine. Eldon Wonderlic. Wonderlic Inc. As Charles Wonderlic drove from the NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis to his company’s headquarters near Chicago on February 27, 2011, he made the mistake of turning on a sports radio show. The host, as Wonderlic remembers, was talking about Alabama quarterback Greg McElroy’s near-perfect Wonderlic score. Each winter, hundreds of football prospects take the multiple-choice test that claims to measure their intelligence. Results are supposed to be kept confidential, yet they always seem to become media fodder.In reality, there’s no way anyone could’ve known McElroy’s score. On that day four years ago, as reports of McElroy’s supposed feat trickled out, sealed boxes containing every single Wonderlic answer sheet were sitting in Charles Wonderlic’s car, still unscanned. Wonderlic, Inc. didn’t send an encrypted file of the players’ results to the NFL until March 1. Unsurprisingly, a variety of news outlets ran with the story anyway.1For example: purveyor of NFL rumors and gossip ProFootballTalk — which, has since mostly ended its coverage of Wonderlic scores — published three conflicting blog posts about McElroy’s alleged score. The first named McElroy’s alleged score, the second quoted an anonymous scout saying there was “no chance” McElroy’s score could’ve leaked that quickly, and the third claimed that McElroy didn’t score as high as initially reported. The third report was closest to the mark, as it turned out. The months leading up to the NFL Draft feel like election season: Everybody’s trying to dig up dirt on candidates.“Are we just so starved for information this time of year that we search for anything?” wondered NFL Scouting Combine director Jeff Foster, who only agreed to be interviewed for this article after I assured him that I wouldn’t be reporting individual Wonderlic scores.In an era when the NFL schedule release is treated like the premiere of the new “Star Wars,” the answer to Foster’s question is a resounding “yes.” We crave even the smallest bits of information about players entering the NFL Draft, even if it’s not meant for our consumption. Forget Foster’s estimate that half the Wonderlic scores he sees in news stories are incorrect. As long as the test is administered at the Combine, media and fans will fixate on it.“The only person it impacts is the player,” Foster said of a leaked Wonderlic score. “How would you like to be branded unintelligent because you scored a 5 on an intelligence test?”The story of the Wonderlic, however, is more than just a range of easily regurgitated numbers. It’s the story of how one guy’s American Dream helped shape a new American pastime. read more

Hughton issues complacency warning

first_imgBrighton & Hove Albion manager Chris Hughton believes that their biggest challenge in 2019 will be trying to avoid complacency.Brighton are sitting comfortably in 13th place in the Premier League table after amassing 25 points from 20 matches so far.But Chris Hughton has stressed the need to maintain their level of play as the second half of the season starts.“The biggest challenge is always complacency – in every game, we played in this division we are faced with tough opposition and that’s a reminder each week that if we don’t reach a level we can get punished,” Hughton told the club’s official website.“That’s always there for us, we’re still in our second season in this division and our aim is to maintain our status in the league and develop and grow as a club.Pep Guardiola: “Aymeric Laporte’s injury doesn’t look good” Andrew Smyth – August 31, 2019 Manchester City boss Pep Guardiola admits Aymeric Laporte’s injury “does not look good” and fears the defender will be out for a long time.“We’ve worked very hard to be where we are now, and we have to be respectful that every single game we play is a difficult one – there’ll be bigger and more experienced teams than us that will find it difficult – there are reminders every week in this league about that.”“My feeling is that we have to continue in the same mentality, the gap between ourselves and the bottom three will always be the most important thing for quite some time to develop as a team.”last_img read more

Five more county flu deaths reported flu cases declining

first_img April 17, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Five more flu-related deaths were documented last week in San Diego County, though the number of influenza cases decreased countywide for the third consecutive week, health officials announced today.The five residents who died due to flu-related causes ranged in age from 47 to 77 years old. All five had additional medical issues,  as well, according to the county’s Health and Human Services Agency.The deaths bring the county’s flu season death toll to 64; flu deaths at this time last season totaled 339.Confirmed flu cases dipped to 249 last week from a revised total of 312 cases during the week prior. The county has confirmed 9,012 flu cases throughout this flu season, with 87.2 percent of those cases being influenza A H3N2. At this time last flu season, the county had confirmed 20,539 cases.“While the numbers continue to decline, the flu season is not over yet,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, the county’s public health officer. “It is never too late to get a flu shot since influenza cases are reported year round.”County health officials and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention strongly advise the annual flu vaccination for everyone 6 months and older, especially in demographics with a heightened risk of serious complications, such as pregnant women, people older than 65 and people with chronic conditions.Flu shots are available at doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, community clinics and the county’s public health centers. Residents also can call 211 or visit the county’s immunization program website, sdiz.com, for a list of county locations administering free vaccines. KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Posted: April 17, 2019 Five more county flu deaths reported, flu cases declining Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more