Vietnam likely to scale back coal plant construction program

first_imgVietnam likely to scale back coal plant construction program FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Bloomberg:Vietnam may scale back a plan to boost coal’s role in its power generation as financial restrictions and local environmental concerns make it more difficult to build plants.The National Steering Committee for Power Development has recommended eliminating about 15 gigawatts of planned new coal plants by 2025 due to slow progress and the unwillingness of some regions to develop them, according to state-controlled news website VietnamPlus. The central government will have final say on the plan.The recommendation underscores how coal’s status as the cheapest and easiest option for developing countries to bring power to their people is being challenged on multiple fronts as richer nations shy away from the fuel. Global banks are refusing to lend, making it more difficult and costly to build plants burning the dirtiest fossil fuel, while costs are tumbling for competing renewable generation.Under the committee’s proposal, coal would provide about 37% of Vietnam’s electricity by 2025 instead of half as previously planned. Renewable power would help fill the gap, increasing to about a quarter of the country’s power from 13% in the existing version. The share for natural gas and major hydropower plants, which comprise most of the remaining capacity, would be left little changed.Vietnam is a flashpoint in the global debate about coal power. About 17 gigawatts of coal power is already under construction with another 29 gigawatts at various pre-construction phases, said Daine Loh, an analyst at Fitch Solutions. It has the fourth-largest pipeline of proposed plants, according to BloombergNEF, many of which have drawn financing in past years from lenders in Japan and other countries.Several banks in Japan, as well as South Korea and Singapore, last year joined lenders from Europe and the U.S. in limiting financing in the fuel because of concerns that climate change would mean the polluting projects would have to be shut before loans could be paid off. The departure of Asian lenders will likely be an inflection point in keeping new plants in places like Indonesia and Vietnam from being financed, BNEF analyst Allen Tom Abraham said in a Feb. 25 report. Private sector companies have proposed building about 20.3 gigawatts of coal plants in Vietnam through 2030, according to BNEF. Less than 8 gigawatts of that has reached financial close, and many of the remaining plants will never get financing, Abraham said.[Mai Ngoc Chau, Dan Murtaugh]More: Vietnam may back off from coal as plants get harder to buildlast_img read more

5 ways to protect credit union employees through a pandemic

first_img continue reading » We continue to hear from credit union leaders that a chief concern among their members is the health and well-being of the credit union people who serve them. Several cooperatives have reported a large number of calls from members asking how employees are being accommodated and protected during the COVID-19 crisis. This is just one of several ways our industry’s “We’re in this together” spirit has manifest over the last few weeks; it’s been incredibly uplifting to experience in the face of so much turmoil.So, what can be done to ensure credit union employees are well taken care of as the U.S. continues to battle the spread of the novel coronavirus? Here are some of the things working well for our credit union partners across the country:Limiting or Rotating Employees On-Site: There are many operational tasks credit union employees must complete in a given day that fly in the face of social distancing. As you consider necessary changes to these tasks, be mindful of regulatory and bylaw restrictions. However, don’t be afraid to make prudent adjustments in the name of protecting your employees and staff. If you must make exceptions to the rules be diligent about documenting the reasoning behind the exception. Include details around who was a part of making that decision, the action that was taken and the outcomes if any. All that documentation will come in handy when your credit union inevitably does its business continuity planning debrief.Following CDC Guidelines: The Centers for Disease Control has provided several best practices for preventing the spread of COVID-19. Ensure employees are well-trained and supported in the practice of these procedures, which include washing their hands often, especially when handling money and other items members may bring into the cooperative; not touching their eyes, nose and mouth; washing their hands often; avoiding close contact with people who are sick; and, of course, staying home if they are sick. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Catena proposes digital growth expert Cecilia Qvist as new governance advisor

first_img GiG lauds its ‘B2B makeover’ delivering Q2 growth August 11, 2020 Catena lauds ‘record’ Q2 as casino drives performance August 19, 2020 Submit Related Articles Share Kindred marks fastest route to ‘normal trading’ as it delivers H1 growth July 24, 2020 StumbleUpon Share Stockholm-listed industry affiliate marketing network Catena Media Plc will move to expand its Board of Directors to seven active members, proposing Cecilia Qvist as its latest governance appointee.A digital strategy and multi-market growth expert, Qvist currently serves as Global Head of Markets for Spotify Music. Qvist has further held senior executive positions at Ericsson telecommunications and Swedbank.The expected appointment will see Qvist act as a corporate advisor for Catena governance and leadership, as the fast-growing enterprise targets further expansion in new markets and by strengthening its market propositions and assets.Updating investors, Catena governance will propose Qvist to the Nomination Committee at the upcoming Annual General Meeting set for 26 April 2018.Catena governance will further propose that Kathryn Moore Baker is re-elected as Chairman of Board of Directors.Kathryn Moore Baker was appointed Catena Media Chairman in June 2016, and currently leads the firm’s executive search for a new Chief Executive following the departure of Robert Andersson in October 2017.The firm’s leadership is currently being held by Optimizer Invest Partner and enterprise investor, Henrik Persson Ekdahl as acting CEO.last_img read more

Greenhouse emissions similar to today’s may have triggered massive temperature rise in Earth’s past

first_imgAbout 55.5 million years ago, a burst of carbon dioxide raised Earth’s temperature 5°C to 8°C, which had major impacts on numerous species of plants and wildlife. Scientists analyzing ancient soil samples now say a previous burst of the greenhouse gas preceded this event, known as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), and probably triggered it. Moreover, they believe humans are pumping similar levels of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere right now, raising concerns that our own emissions may also destabilize Earth’s climate, triggering the planet to emit devastating bursts of carbon in the future.The paper implies that even if we stopped emitting carbon dioxide right now, our descendants might still face huge temperature rises, says paleoclimatologist Gabriel Bowen of the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, the lead author of the new research. “It is a possibility,” he says, “and it’s a scary one.”Scientists accept that a massive injection of carbon into the atmosphere caused the PETM, but they don’t agree about where the gas came from. Some researchers say it originated from the release of carbon locked up under the ocean by an undersea landslide; others blame a comet crashing into Earth, causing carbon from both the comet and Earth to be oxidized to carbon dioxide and potentially causing wildfires or burning of carbon-rich peat bogs on Earth. They also don’t know how long the release lasted, with recent estimates ranging from 10 years to 20,000 years.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)One of the best ways to measure the prehistoric release of carbon into the atmosphere is to look at the ratio of two types of carbon atoms called isotopes. Carbon has two stable isotopes: About 99% of natural carbon is carbon-12, whereas the remaining 1% is mainly the heavier carbon-13, with trace amounts of radioactive carbon-14 that decay within a few thousand years to nitrogen. Living organisms have a slight preference for the lighter isotope, so carbon derived from organic sources (such as fossil fuels) is slightly depleted in carbon-13. If that carbon gets returned to the atmosphere at a faster rate than normal, atmospheric carbon dioxide has less carbon-13 than normal. Plants taking up this carbon dioxide become even more carbon-13 depleted, and when they decompose, this depletion is recorded in the soil.Sedimentary rock samples that have been compacted from soils formed at the time of the PETM contain less carbon-13 than normal. Sedimentary rocks of the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming contain one of the best records of soils from this period. Geologists have studied them for more than 100 years, but to obtain samples from soils of different periods, geologists had to analyze surface rocks from different parts of the basin and try to piece together a continuous geological history. Therefore, the Bighorn Basin Coring Project, run by the University of New Hampshire, Durham, drilled approximately 1 km of core from each of three different points in the basin to give geologists three clear, continuous records of how the soils had varied over time in a particular place.Bowen and colleagues analyzed one of these cores, tracking the variations in carbon isotope ratios in greater detail than had been previously possible by examining surface rocks. They report online today in Nature Geoscience that in soils beneath those laid down during the main rise in temperature about 55.5 million years ago, there was a distinct drop in the proportion of carbon-13. In soils immediately on top of these, the ratio seemed to recover to its normal value. Finally, soils on top of these showed a large drop in the proportion of carbon-13 corresponding to the PETM itself.So what was going on? The researchers concluded that there must have been two separate releases of carbon. The first, smaller release, about 2000 years before the main temperature rise, was followed by a recovery to normal climatic conditions. Later, a second, larger pulse caused the main event. “I’m fairly convinced that they’re related,” Bowen says. “We see nothing remotely similar during the many hundreds of thousands of years before this event. To have within a few thousand years these two major carbon isotope shifts and have that be circumstantial would be quite remarkable.”The researchers used climate models to investigate how the initial, smaller heating could have triggered the later surge in temperature. They estimate that the first thermal pulse is likely to have warmed Earth’s atmosphere by 2°C to 3°C, but that the atmospheric temperature would have gradually returned to normal as the heat was absorbed into the deep ocean. However, when that heat finally reached the ocean floor, it might have melted methane ices called clathrates, releasing the methane into the ocean and allowing it to make its way into the atmosphere. As a greenhouse gas, methane is 21 times more potent than carbon dioxide, so a sudden spike in methane emissions could lead to huge climate change.“The connection between these two pulses is something that it’s going to be really important to get a handle on,” Bowen says. The researchers believe the rate at which carbon dioxide escaped into the atmosphere during both bursts is unlikely to have been greater than the rate at which humans are emitting it now, and it may have been considerably lower. “Carbon release back then looked a lot like human fossil fuel emissions today,” Bowen says. “So we might learn a lot about the future from changes in climate, plants, and animal communities 55.5 million years ago.”“We think this is really good news for our contention that the release of carbon was very fast,” says marine geologist James Wright of Rutgers University, New Brunswick, an advocate of the comet impact hypothesis.Wright is not convinced, however, about the importance of the first pulse in triggering the second. He suggests that the most logical interpretation of the apparent cooling after the first pulse is that its significance was less than Bowen’s group believes, with limited effect on the overall ocean temperature, and that not just the atmosphere but rather the entire planet quickly returned to normal. “If that’s the case, then the first has nothing to do with the second,” Wright says. That, in turn, would require an alternative explanation for the PETM such as a comet impact.last_img read more

Block Facebook Live Notifications

first_imgBlock Facebook Live Notifications by Martin Brinkmann on June 24, 2016 in Companies, Facebook – Last Update: January 04, 2018 – 3 commentsThe following guide walks you through the steps of blocking Facebook Live Notifications for live video streams on the social networking site.Facebook Live is a relatively new feature on Facebook that users of the service can utilize to stream live video on the site.Anyone on Facebook can use Facebook’s applications to broadcast live. As is the case with all things that end up in your news feed, some may be more interesting than others.One issue with Facebook Live is that notifications are turned on by default which means that you will be informed about any live stream that Facebook friends start.This makes sense considering that time is of the essence when it comes to live streams, as you would not know about it in first place if Facebook would not push out notifications.On the other hand, if your friends use the live stream feature for things that are of little or no interest to you, then you may want to block Facebook Live notifications on the site as you’d probably be annoyed by those notifications after a while. This is true especially if some happen to live stream regularly.Block Facebook Live NotificationsIt is thankfully rather easy to turn off Facebook Live Notifications. One of the fastest option to do so is the following one:Load the page https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=notifications&section=on_facebook&view on a desktop computer.Locate the Live Videos section under “What you get notified about”.Click on the menu to its right, and switch it to All Off.Facebook does not list the difference between All Off and Suggestions Off, the second option besides On. It is likely that Suggestions Off will block live video notifications that don’t originate from a user’s friend list.If the direct link won’t load for you, do the following instead:Click on the down arrow icon at the top right corner of the Facebook page. It is the rightmost icon on Facebook currently.Select Settings from the menu that opens.On the Settings page, switch to Notifications. You find the link listed on the left.When the Notifications page opens, select On Facebook.There you find the Live Videos notifications setting, and the option to turn it off.The Facebook application, at least the one on Android, does not include an option to turn off live notifications currently.SummaryArticle NameBlock Facebook Live NotificationsDescriptionThe following guide walks you through the steps of blocking Facebook Live Notifications for live video streams on the social networking site.Author Martin BrinkmannPublisher Ghacks Technology NewsLogo Advertisementlast_img read more