Mayor Faulconer orders Public Utilities Department to investigate every customer complaint of

first_img KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Mayor Faulconer orders Public Utilities Department to investigate every customer complaint of high water bills Posted: February 1, 2018 February 1, 2018 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Mayor Kevin Faulconer has directed the city’s Public Utilities Department to investigate every complaint of high water bills after some residents have noticed unexplained skyrocketing charges in recent months.The move is the latest in the city’s response to the complaints that have been covered by local media. City Councilwoman Barbara Bry on Wednesday asked the city auditor to look into the utility department’s billing procedures.So far, city officials have discovered several factors that could contribute to high water bills: a 6.9 percent rate increase that took effect on Aug. 1, a one-time billing schedule change that extended the normal 60-day billing period to up to 70 days late last year, warmer months that could contribute to increased usage, meter reading inconsistencies and leaks in homes and irrigation systems, according to the mayor’s office.“San Diegans need to be able to trust that their bills are correct — and that every cent they pay goes to ensuring we have safe, reliable water,” Faulconer said. “I’ve directed our Public Utilities Department to review every complaint to ensure that nobody is being overcharged and to correct any mistakes immediately.”In one case, for example, a resident’s bill jumped from around $200 in February 2016 to more than $1,000 in the most recent billing cycle, with no increase in usage, Fox 5 reported.Those with questions or concerns about their water bill can contact the utilities department at (619) 515-3500 or [email protected] Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Wiredcom Adds Two New Channels

first_img Transportation, which previously lived as a subsection of Wired’s “Gear” channel, will now occupy a tab of its own, headed by associate editor Alex Davies. Prior to joining Wired in 2014, Davies spent two years as a reporter for Business Insider. The new sections join Wired’s existing channels—Business, Design, Gear, Science, and Security—on Wired.com, which received a redesign in March. “The new WIRED Culture section will be home to smart thinking about how society is changing: how we communicate, what we value, how we grow,” the introductory note reads. “Every tomorrow is brighter than the one before it, and that’s bigger than entertainment—that’s culture.” Citing Wired’s coverage of recent innovations like Audi’s self-driving car and Tesla’s electric SUV, Davies explained in an editor’s note, “How we move around on the planet (and beyond it) is fundamentally changing—and as it does, it will change a great deal about who we are, how we interact, and what our lives look like.” Senior editor Peter Rubin—who oversaw the former entertainment tab—will head up the new culture section, while former Yahoo! Movies managing editor Brian Raftery will be a senior writer. The section will publish 40 to 50 stories each month, according to the company. The transportation vertical will publish about 40 pieces per month, at least 40 percent of which will be related to automotive technology. Wired is looking to bring in two additional full-time writers for the new section. center_img The new culture section is a re-branding, of sorts, of the tab formerly known as entertainment. An introductory note describes the shift as reflective of the increasingly-dominant role that the internet and social media play in defining “WIRED culture”—from memes and hashtags to Vines and Periscope streams—extending far beyond movies, music, television, and video games. Wired kicked off 2016 by adding two new sections to its website: Culture and Transportation. Transportation-related content accounted for eight percent of all traffic to Wired.com in 2015, according to the company, up 30 percent from the year prior. Ford Motor Company serves as the transportation section’s launch sponsor.last_img read more

Hannah Storm Andrea Kremer Lead Football Fans to New Frontier Via Amazon

first_imgHannah Storm knows football fans have to take an extra step to listen to her and Andrea Kremer broadcast “Thursday Night Football.” “It is your choice,” she told viewers during last week’s game between the Denver Broncos and the Arizona Cardinals.You won’t find the duo holding forth on Fox, which owns TV rights to the NFL’s Thursday-night showcase.  To get to them, a sports aficionado must subscribe to Amazon Prime, then opt not only to stream each week’s contest, but also toggle the audio selection to “Storm-Kremer” rather than sticking with the default Fox feed.The results can be astonishing. Where are the deep male tones of a team like Fox’s Joe Buck and Troy Aikman or NBC’s Al Michaels and Cris Collinsworth? Never before in the history of NFL broadcasting has an all-female team called TV games.  On other media outlets, female sportscasters such as Michele Tafoya or Lisa Salters work the sidelines for NBC or ESPN.  Storm and Kremer gather each Thursday night for Amazon at a studio in Stamford, Conn, relaying their take on a match between the Los Angeles Rams and the Minnesota Vikings or the Philadelphia Eagles and the New York Giants. Kremer and Storm aren’t simply trying to reach U.S. football fans. Their broadcast can stream in more than 200 different countries and territories around the world. With that in mind, they believe there’s room to dive in on certain elements of play important to each game, rather than feeling they have to be tied to whatever image Fox is putting up on the feed. “We want to experience what it is, which is not in any way dumbing it down. It’s just expanding things,” says Kremer.  “We are not going to do traditional X’s and O’s and analysis,” says Storm, “because we might be drilling deep into a subject.”The two found Amazon’s idea impossible to resist.  Executives from the e-retailing giant approached Octagon, the Interpublic Group-owned sports-and-entertainment agency that represents both sportscasters, and their agent Phil de Picciotto, about working with them. They spoke with Jason Weichelt, a live events production executive from Amazon, and liked the fact that the company wanted to work with them because of their experience, not because it wanted female sportscasters.“We thought that took it from a realm of ‘Yeah, we are just looking for a female broadcast booth,’ into the realm of ‘We want your specific voices – yours and Andrea’s,’” says Storm.   “This wasn’t a gimmick. That was really critical.”They have known each other for years, but never worked together. Now, they have the chance to change perceptions of how live sports are handled. If their football talk finds fans, other media companies may want to try similar arrangements. Kremer says she and Storm are focused on using their experience to bring out the best in the games. Their knowledge, she says, is what fans really want.  “You may choose that you don’t care to listen to women,” she says, “but you cannot besmirch our accomplishments.” Popular on Variety The two veteran sportscasters know they represent something different.  “We are doing something new. Are we taking a risk? Absolutely,” says Kremer, known for her work on NFL Network and HBO, among other places.  “Someone had to be first,” says Storm, a veteran of NBC Sports, CBS News and ESPN. “Our hope is other people will see it as maybe a path they would want to follow.”Amazon declined to offer statistics on how many people are tuning in to listen to Kremer and Storm, but their assignment is viewed in some circles as seismic. “This is part of the social revolution,” says Dan Lebowitz, executive director of the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University. In 1978, he says, female sports journalists had to go to court to get access to interview athletes in team locker rooms like their male counterparts. Now, he suggests, women are an integral part of the NFL’s economics. “The largest growth in their fan base is women,” he notes.Amazon’s choice shows media outlets working to curry a younger audience for whom old programming norms are no longer relevant, says  David Carter, executive director of the Sports Business Institute at University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business  “At this point viewers, regardless of platform, want reliability and credibility when it comes to being able to watch the game and gather insight from on-air talent,” he says. “Gender seems to have largely faded as an issue impacting most viewers’ decisions, especially among younger viewers for whom female broadcasters have always been a part of the landscape. It is all about the ability to distribute content seamlessly and have it described professionally.” Other places are testing new concepts, including NBC’s “Today,” which now relies on the team of Savannah Guthrie and Hoda Kotb – the first time the NBC morning mainstay has relied on two female co-anchors. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more