Wednesday October 2nd Local Sports

first_imgCEDAR FALLS — A challenging non-conference schedule should have the Northern Iowa Panthers ready for the start of a difficult Missouri Valley Football Conference race. The 13th ranked Panthers are 2-2 after a loss at number five Weber State and open the league slate by hosting 17th ranked Youngstown State.That’s UNI coach Mark Farley who says the Panthers have been tested.Youngstown State is off to a 4-0 start.The Penguins are averaging more than 296 yards of rushing per game. GRINNELL — Grinnell College has canceled its remaining football season. Athletic Director Andy Hamilton says the squad only had 28 healthy players for this week’s game at St. Norbert.Hamilton says they were concerned about further injury playing with such a limited roster.Hamilton says their plan is to bring the program back for next season. There are five seniors on the squad.Grinnell lost its first three games by a combined score of 114-3. IOWA CITY — Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz will have a healthier team this weekend when the Hawkeyes visit Michigan. Safety Kaevon Merriweather and corner Julius Brents are expected to play and offensive tackle Alaric Jackson returned to practice. He suffered a sprained knee early in the season opener.Ferentz says the positive side of early season injuries is the Hawkeyes have built some depth.Iowa has only won 15 of the 60 games in the series against Michigan and Ferentz says it is never easy winning on the road against one of the country’s premier programs.Time of possession is considered an overrated stat but Ferentz says it can be crucial to winning on the road.An improved Iowa run game may help that cause. The Hawkeyes are averaging 217 yards on the ground per game and 5.2 yards per carry.===Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh hopes his team can put together a streak. After getting hammered at Wisconsin the Wolverines bounced back with a 52-0 win over Rutgers.Harbaugh on the challenge the Hawkeyes provide.Harbaugh says Iowa and Wisconsin have a lot of similarities.Kickoff on Saturday is scheduled for 11 o’clock, with the pre-game at 9:00 AM on KGLO. AMES — Matt Campbell coached Iowa State teams have won seven straight games in October and they look to keep the run going at home against TCU. The Cyclones are 2-2 after a 23-21 loss at Baylor.Campbell says there are a lot of things that go into their October success.Campbell is not concerned about a run game that managed only 62 yards in a loss at Baylor. Trailing by three touchdowns the Cyclones were forced to go to the air.Campbell says defensive end JaQuan Bailey is questionable for the game. He suffered a lower leg injury in the loss at Baylor.Kickoff in Ames is scheduled for 11 o’clock on Saturdaycenter_img — high school volleyball last nightCentral Springs 25-25-25, Newman 12-21-17Waukee 3-0 Mason City (set scores not available)Clarion-Goldfield-Dows 25-25-25-25, Humboldt 21-27-22-22Forest City 24-25-25-25, Bishop Garrigan 26-14-20-22Garner-Hayfield-Ventura 25-19-25-25, Hampton-Dumont 23-25-23-20Lake Mills 20-25-25-25, North Iowa 25-17-12-12Osage 25-25-25, Rockford 14-12-11Saint Ansgar 21-25-25-25, Northwood-Kensett 25-14-21-23 ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota Wild defenseman Greg Pateryn has undergone surgery on his midsection and will be out about six more weeks. The operation went as planned in Philadelphia. Pateryn is a seven-year veteran starting his second season with the Wild. He missed most of training camp because of the injury. He had one goal and six assists in 80 games last seasonlast_img read more

Local Biotech Firm Claims to Produce COVID Vaccines Faster, Cheaper

first_img“I mean people are talking about if they are lucky they can make a billion doses in a year,” he adds. “In a week, we can pump out 1.5 billion doses of an antigen, which is the most active component that goes into making a vaccine. It’s a critical component.”Dyadic is working with labs and scientists worldwide on the project.The way it works is those labs share their vaccine gene sequence, which Dyadic places into its hyper-productivity C1 cells.The cells are grown in commercial fermenters, in order to produce the antigen quickly.Data so far indicates that C1 will be effective in vaccine production, according to Emalfarb.While the typical turnaround time for other methods is about 50 days,  Emalfarb says commercial fermenters can mass-produce batches of C1 in just 10 to 14 days. Mark Emalfarb, founder and CEO of Dyadic International, which is headquartered in Jupiter, tells West Palm Beach television station WPEC his staff is capable of producing one-billion doses per month.Emalfarb explains that he has spent the last two-and-a-half decades engineering a fungal cell, nicknamed C1, which is now being used in industrial biotech.He goes on to say that it is being further developed to help eventually mass-produce vaccines and drugs in larger quantities at a more affordable cost.“It’s very unique and the hyper-productivity came from a serendipitous mutation,” he says. “This is something that happened by accident, kind of like penicillin.”In addition, Emalfarb believes the technology, which has FDA GRAS approval for food and feed and has already been successfully tested on animals, could lead to mass production of a coronavirus vaccine. A South Florida-based biotech company says it has the science to mass-produce COVID-19 vaccines more quickly and cost effectively than anyone else, when they become available.last_img read more

Meghan’s amazing college career continues with eighth win

first_img England international Meghan MacLaren continued her remarkable US college career with her eighth win on the women’s circuit. She won the Conference USA women’s championship for the second year in a row and the third time in total. The 21-year-old, from Wellingborough in Northamptonshire, scored three-under par at the Verandah Club in Fort Myers, Florida, and was two clear of the field.  She’s only the second student at Florida International University to win the title back to back and be a three-time individual conference champion. MacLaren (Image © Leaderboard Photography) flew home after the event to play in this weekend’s Helen Holm Scottish women’s stroke play championship at Troon. She’s teaming up there with fellow international Inci Mehmet (Royal Mid Surrey) to represent England in the Nations Cup. MacLaren is a past winner of the British and Irish stroke play titles and was eighth in the 2016 South American amateur. She is an England and GB&I international and represented Europe in this season’s inaugural Patsy Hankins Trophy against Asia Pacific. She is a member of the England Golf women’s squad. 22 Apr 2016 Meghan’s amazing college career continues with eighth win last_img read more

New-look Leafs thump Rebels in pre-season opener

first_imgIt may be only August, and the Leafs first exhibition game, but after last season anything and everything is a bonus.The Nelson Leafs fired 45 shots at the Rebel net en route to a 10-2 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Exhibition victory Tuesday at the NDCC Arena.The contest was the first of the pre-season for the Leafs, which host Beaver Valley Nitehawks Wednesday at in Nelson.Game time is 7 p.m.Nelson scored four times in the second period, snapping a 2-2 first period tie.Andy Fitzpatrick and Jack Karran each scored three times while Charlie Wilkie added a pair. Sawyer Hunt and Cleary Ambrose scored singles as Nelson outshot the Rebels 45-12.The Leafs conclude the exhibition season Friday in Fruitvale and Sunday in Castlegar.Nelson opens the regular season Friday, September 9 against Beaver Valley Nitehawks.First home game is Friday, September 16 against Spokane Braves.No to Travel FundArmstrong, home to the North Okanagan Knights, has decided not to partake in a travel fund for teams representing the KIJHL in Junior B  tournaments outside the province.Armstrong council recently defeated a motion by District of 100 Mile House.The 100 Mile House Wranglers won the KIJHL title before representing the league at the Cyclone Taylor and Keystone Cup Championships — the latter tournament held outside BC.The motion asked each of the 20 KIJHL communities to donate $500 to the KIJHL travel fund.last_img read more

SANTA ANITA PARK TO PROMOTE LITTLE RED FEATHER RACING’S FIRST EVER ‘CROWD FUNDING CAMPAIGN’ TO ATTRACT NEW OWNERS

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Oct. 13, 2016)–In its continued efforts to reach out to prospective new owners, Santa Anita Park has entered into a marketing collaboration with Little Red Feather Racing, one of California’s largest ownership syndicates, to help promote Little Red Feather Racing’s new “Crowd Funding Campaign.” The initiative incorporates innovative strategies to attract new people to The Sport of Kings.Little Red Feather has announced that these “Crowd Funding” packages are available on several levels. This unique approach appeals to a wide range of potential owners who seek the kind of excitement that ownership can bring.“We are continually looking at ways to bring new people into our sport and we welcome Little Red Feather’s enthusiasm and commitment in attracting new owners,” said Joe Morris, Vice President, West Coast Operations for the Stronach Group. “Moving forward, we welcome innovation in this area and we look forward to assisting others, in addition to Little Red Feather, in promoting initiatives that grow our sport.”“We are thrilled that 100 partners have so far joined us for this historic venture,” said Little Red Feather CEO Gary Fenton. “It shows if we create the right partnership, people will give horse ownership a try. We can’t wait to show them how much fun it is.”Little Red Feather Racing, which was founded by Managing Partner Billy Koch in 2004, first gained national prominence by winning the $1.5 million Breeders’ Cup Mile that year with Singletary. Along with General Counsel and CEO Gary Fenton, Little Red Feather horses have now won 192 races from 1,063 starts (18 percent) and grossed $10,735,470 in purses (through June 30, 2016).For more information on Little Red Feather’s new “Crowd Funding Campaign,” please visit www.littleredfeatherracing.com, or call (310) 850-4724. –30–last_img read more

Hangeland injury a worry for Fulham

first_imgBrede Hangeland suffered an Achilles injury in Fulham’s defeat against Manchester United and boss Martin Jol is hoping the defender will not be added to the club’s list of long-term absentees. Hangeland was forced off at the interval after struggling to get through the first half.Jol said: “I’m hoping it is not a long one – he picked up an Achilles problem.“That’s the first time I’ve had to substitute him all season and hopefully it’s not too serious.”See also:Fulham undone by Rooney’s late winner 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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Bacterial Flagellum Visualized

first_imgTom Magnuson at Access Research Network found this link that came out last year but is too good to pass up: another visualization of the bacterial flagellum, the “poster child of the ID movement,” by Japanese researchers on NanoNet, the Nanotechnology Researchers Network Center of Japan.  The 02/05/2004 NanoNet Bulletin features the bacterial flagellum with still images from a stunning movie they made, A Rotary Nanomachine, downloadable from the site.  The movie contains crisp animations of the flagellar motor at work and features amazing facts about how the propeller is assembled, molecule by molecule, at the growing tip.  The film (34 minutes, 36mb) also tells the story of how challenging it was for the team to image the nanometer-scale parts of the system.    Another issue, 09/16/2004 NanoNet Bulletin tells how professor Masasuke Yoshido first visualized the rotation of another biomolecular rotary motor, ATP synthase.  The entire website is concerned with nanotechnology, and many of the articles blur the distinction between biological and artificial machines.This film makes a terrific follow-up to Unlocking the Mystery of Life for those interested in additional technical details of how the flagellum works.  The animations are superb.  Nobody would be able to look at this system and say it wasn’t designed – it looks for all the world like finely-crafted machinery.  The researchers are in awe of the precision of the parts and the efficiency of the motor.  Is it any wonder that there is no mention of evolution?  On the contrary, the word design is key: “Looking at the shape of the flagellar basal body,” said Keiici Namba, the interviewee, “it is obviously designed to rotate.”    Dr. Namba also said something that shows how biological design can stimulate a Darwin-free research program: “Looking at a picture of the flagellar motor on the wall every day,” he said in Asianized English, “I feel up towards revealing the mystery by any means.”  How it works – and what we can learn from the design – those ideas borrow nothing from Darwinian theory, and sound remarkably similar to the motivations of Robert Boyle, James Joule and many other creation scientists throughout history.  None of the People of Froth (the Anti-ID crowd) could claim that these Japanese researchers had a religious motivation for making this film or for doing their cutting-edge research.  School boards can show this film as proof that design-based science is powerful and productive.  The end of science?  Bringing science to a halt?  Taking us back to the Dark Ages?  Bosh—this is the future of active, fruitful, motivating research that will inspire young scientists and bring the best technology to bear on understanding biological realities (see 10/29/2005 story).    Intelligent design is not so much about making additions to science, but rather some blessed subtractions: removing the useless fluff of Darwinian speculation and storytelling (12/22/2003) that produces nothing but vaporware on back order.  Throughout history (see online book), the design perspective has mastered the machinery of science that produces the goods.(Visited 32 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South African sports trivia

first_imgWho was the first black South African to play professional football in Europe? Who’s the most economical bowler in cricket history? Who kicked the most drop- goals ever in a rugby test match? Which sportsman can claim to have suffered the most jet-lag?Take a quick spin through our assortment of South African sports trivia.FOOTBALLPule ‘Ace’ Ntsoelengoe, the midfield general of many fine Kaizer Chiefs teams of the mid-1970s to mid-1980s, was inducted into the US Soccer Hall of Fame in October 2003. One of the North American Soccer League’s all-time leaders for both appearances and goals, “Ace” was voted onto the NASL’s All Star line-up in 1979 and 1982. Former South Africa coach Clive Barker – among many others – rates Ace as perhaps the best player South Africa has ever produced.Long before Lucas Radebe made his mark at Leeds United, becoming “The Chief” in the club’s central defence, there was another South African who served the club with distinction. Albert Johanneson was a left wing who represented the All Whites in 200 matches in the 1960s, netting 68 times.Who is he? He’s had a street in Amsterdam named after him. He’s had a book written and a film made about him. He was the first black South African to play professional football in Europe. After signing for English club Coventry City in 1955, he went on to achieve superstar status playing for Dutch side Heracles and later for Torino in Italy, becoming one of a few players in Europe to earn £10 000 a year. Who is he?RUGBYSpringbok flyhalf Jannie de Beer holds the world record for most dropped goals in a test match. Playing against England in the quarterfinals of the Rugby World Cup in October 1999, De Beer kicked five dropped goals, all in the second half, as South Africa won 44-21. De Beer scored 34 points.From 23 August 1997 to 28 November 1998, the Springboks won 17 successive rugby tests to equal the world record. Their record included three wins against Australia, two wins against New Zealand, two wins against England and two wins against France.Kitch Christie, who coached the Springboks to World Cup success in 1995, was in charge of the Boks for 14 tests. Those matches all ended in victory.Long before South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994, Errol Tobias sealed his place in South African rugby history by becoming the first black player to start a test match for the Springboks, when he faced Ireland at Newlands on 30 May 1981. He was 31 at the time. In the four matches that Tobias played at flyhalf, South Africa scored 122 points, running in 18 tries, 12 of them by backline players. He played 15 times for the Springboks, including in six Tests – all of which South Africa won.Jonathan Kaplan set a world first by becoming the first referee in the history of rugby to take charge of 50 tests when he took the whistle in the 2009 Six Nations contest between Scotland and Ireland at Murrayfield.CRICKETGraeme Pollock’s test batting average of 60.97 is the second-highest in history, the highest ever by a left hander, and he is one of only four batsmen to average over 60 in a Test career. In February 2009, Pollock was voted into the International Cricket Council’s Hall of Fame as a member of the inaugural class of inductees.Who is he? In just 41 Tests, having made his test debut at the age of 34, he scored 2 484 runs at an average of 40.06, with five centuries and 15 fifties. He also captured 47 wickets at an average 39.55 runs per wicket. He never represented South Africa, yet he was nominated as one of the country’s cricketers of the 20th century. Who is he? Geoff Griffin is the only South African to take a hat-trick in test cricket. He achieved the feat against England at Lords on 23 June 1960. Later in the match he was no-balled for throwing – one of only 11 players to suffer that fate! It proved to be the final test of his career.Among bowlers that played 20 or more tests, South African all-rounder Trevor Goddard is the most economical bowler in history, conceding only 1.64 runs per over.Mike Procter shares the world record with CB Fry and Sir Donald Bradman of scoring six first-class centuries in succession. Showing that he was a fine all-rounder too, Procter is the only cricketer in history to capture two all-LBW hat-tricks.Barry Richards once scored 325 runs in a day, playing for South Australia against Western Australia. He went on to score 356, the highest first-class score by a South African batsman. In January 2009, Richards was inducted into the ICC Hall of Fame as one of the initial 55 players to be honoured.When left-handed opening batsman Gary Kirsten scored 150 against Bangladesh in October 2002, he became the first batsman in test history to score a century against all nine other test-playing countries.And who can forget …? He had shortcomings as a batsman, but was effective and consistent. His third test century was South Africa’s fastest in terms of balls faced. He holds the world record for the most catches – five – by a non- wicketkeeper in a one-day international. Yet his story is definitely not told by his career statistics. Do you remember that run out?Umpire Rudi Koertzen made history on 11 July 2009 when he became the first man to umpire 200 one-day internationals. On 16 July, he became only the second man to stand in 100 tests when he took to the field in the second Ashes test between England and Australia.ATHLETICSReggie Walker won the 100 metres at the Olympic Games in London in 1908 – the only South African, and African, to have won the Olympic 100 metres title.In 1979, Matthews ‘Loop- en-val’ Motshwarateu became the first South African to run the 10 000 metres in under 28 minutes, in one of the most sensational performances in SA athletics history – only three other South Africans have since beaten his time of 27 minutes and 48.2 seconds. “Loop-en-val” was also the first black South African athlete to break a world record, and still holds the SA 10km road record. Check out the full story – and origin of his nickname, which translates as Run and fall.The Comrades, widely regarded as the world’s greatest ultra-marathon, belonged to one man throughout the 1980s. Bruce Fordyce won the event one nine occasions: in 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988 and 1990. He didn’t win in 1989, but then again he didn’t run that year …Two of the biggest names in triathlon history grew up in Durban, South Africa, but never represented the country. Paula Newby-Fraser, representing Zimbabwe, was an eight-time Ironman world champion, while Simon Lessing, representing Great Britain, was a five-time world champion.Okkert Brits is one of only 15 athletes in history to clear six metres in the pole vault. He became the third man in history to achieve the feat when he cleared 6.03m in 1995.BOXINGAfter boxer Brian Mitchell won the WBA junior-lightweight title in 1986, he successfully defended it on 12 occasions before retiring as an undefeated champion. All of his title defences took place outside of South Africa. In December 2008, Mitchell was elected to the International Boxing Hall of Fame, the first South African boxer to achieve the honour …… but not the first South African. Boxing referee Stan Christodoulou , only the third man in history to referee more than 100 world title fights, and the first to referee world title fights in all 17 weight categories, was inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2004.‘Baby Jake’ Matlala, watched by former President Nelson Mandela and American actor Will Smith, brought the curtain down on a 22-year professional career on 3 March 2002 with a seventh- round stoppage win over Juan Herrera to retain his WBU junior flyweight title. At just 4ft 10in or 147cm – not much taller than the average 3ft 6in or 107cm tall Lord of the Rings hobbit – Baby Jake was the shortest ever world boxing champion.GOLFSouth African golfing legend Gary Player is one of only five players to have won golf’s Grand Slam of the US Masters, US Open, British Open and US PGA titles. Player is also one of only three golfers to win the British Open in three different decades – in 1959, 1968 and 1974. (The other two players to win the Open in three different decades did so in the nineteenth century.)During his career, Player has won 163 tournaments all over the world, jetting an estimated total of 17.5-million kilometres, more than any other athlete in history – and he’s still flying, playing, and winning.Sewsunker ‘Papwa’ Sewgolum played at the same time as Gary Player, but apartheid prevented him from making his mark around the world. How good was he? In 1965, when Player won the US Open, the World Cup Invitational, the South African Open, the Australian Open, the World Series, the World Matchplay and the NTL Challenge Cup, he finished second in the Natal Open. Sewgolum beat him.A self-taught golfer, Sewgolum played the game with a back-handed grip, hands positioned the opposite way to the traditional grip. The unorthodox grip has another name – the Sewsunker grip – named after him, because he used it with such success.Golfer Sally Little first made her mark when she was named the LPGA Rookie of the Year in 1971/72. She went on to win 15 LPGA titles, including three majors, and in 1985 became the LPGA’s twelfth millionaire.SWIMMINGOne-legged swimmer Natalie du Toit made history when she qualified for the final of the 800 metres freestyle at the 2002 Commonwealth Games – the athlete with disability ever to qualify for the final of an international able-bodied event. In 2008, Du Toit became the first athlete with a disability to compete at the Olympic Games, finishing 16th in the 10-kilometre open water event.Breaststroke swimmer Penny Heyns, an Olympic champion at 100 and 200 metres, broke four world records over those distances in the space of two days in July 1999. She went on to set eight world records in 11 races.Karen Muir was voted into Swimming’s Hall of Fame in 1980. She became the youngest ever world record holder in any sport in 1965, at age 12, when she established a new mark in the 110 yards backstroke. She went on to set 15 world records.Terence Parkin is the most successful swimmer in the history of the Deaflympics, accumulating 29 medals in total after the conclusion of the 2009 edition of the Games. In 2000, he won a silver medal in the 200 metres breaststroke at the Sydney Olympic Games. He has also won the Midmar Mile twice.Speaking about the Midmar Mile, it is the world’s largest open water swimming event and is recognised as such by Guinness World Records. It was first held in 1973 because petrol restrictions at that time prevented a group of friends from attending the Buffalo Mile in East London. Now held over two days to accommodate all the swimmers, it has drawn in excess of 17 000 competitors.TENNISBob Hewitt and Frew McMillan won 57 career doubles titles, including three Wimbledon crowns. After teaming up they played 45 matches before they suffered their first loss.Wayne Ferreira was a far greater player than many South Africans gave him credit for, as one little-known fact reveals: he boasted a 6-7 career head-to-head record against Pete Sampras. He also cannot be faulted for perseverance: he ended his career having played in a record 56 Grand Slam tournaments in succession.South Africa has one Davis Cup title to its credit – but not one that it likes to boast about. When India withdrew from the final in 1974 in protest against the South African government’s apartheid policy, South Africa became the winner by default.MOTORSPORTJody Scheckter is the only South African to have won motor racing’s Formula One title. He achieved the feat driving for Ferrari in 1979. The Italian team had to wait another 21 years for their next driver’s title, won by Michael Schumacher.Motorcross star Greg Albertyn made his mark overseas, winning the 125cc world title in 1992, followed by the world 250cc title in 1993 and 1994. He then moved to the United States, where he won the 250cc motorcross title in 1999.South African powerboat racing legend Peter Lindenberg won the national Formula One title 15 times between from 1981 to 2001. He might have won even more titles had he not also competed in the Powerboat Racing World Series.CANOEING AND PADDLE-SKIINGGraeme Pope-Ellis won the tough three-day Dusi Canoe Marathon, contested between Pietermaritzburg and Durban, on 15 occasions, competing in both singles and doubles. Not surprisingly he was known as “the Dusi King”.Paddle-skier Oscar Chalupsky has won the Molokai Challenge, considered the world championship of solo ocean paddling, a record 11 times. Seven of those titles came in succession, from 1983 to 1989.OTHER SPORTSThe Cape Argus Pick n Pay Cycle Tour is the world’s largest individually timed cycling event. It has attracted fields as large as 40 000 competitors.Downhill mountain bike racer Greg Minnaar is a three-time winner of the overall UCI World Cup title, in 2001, 2005, and 2008. He also won the World Championships in 2003. Minnaar has achieved more podium finishes than any downhill rider in World Cup history.Shaun Thomson won the world surfing title in 1977. Maybe a greater claim to fame for the man from Durban is that many regard him as the best tube rider of all time.Striker Pietie Coetzee became the all-time leading goal scorer in women’s international hockey on 21 June 2011 with the third of four goals she scored in a 5-5 draw against the USA in the Champions Challenge in Dublin. It took her to 221 goals, bettering the 20-year-old world record of Russia’s Natalya Krasnikova. She retired from international hockey in June 2014 having scored 282 goals in 287 matches. Incredibly, those figures included a five-year hiatus in the prime of her career to concentrate on her studies.Reg Park won the Mr Universe bodybuilding title in 1958 and 1965. He appeared in movies as Hercules between his two wins, and went on to become Arnold Schwarzenegger’s bodybuilding inspiration.The South African men’s bowls team, playing in the World Bowls Championships on home soil in 1976, achieved the unique feat of winning every single title on offer. Doug Watson was crowned singles champion. He and Bill Moseley won the pairs. Kevin Campbell, Nando Gatti and Kelvin Lightfoot triumphed in the triples, and Campbell, Gatti, Lightfoot and Moseley captured the fours title.Anneli Wucherpfenning (Drummond-Hay) enjoyed a spectacular sporting career in show jumping, winning the sport’s biggest event, the Badminton Trials, by the biggest margin in history. Among her other victories were wins in the British Championships, Bughley Horse Trials, the Imperial Cup, the Queen Elizabeth Cup, and the British Jumping Derby.On the subject of sporting greats who grew up, or at least were born in, South Africa: Gary Anderson, the scorer of the second most points in the history of America’s National Football League (NFL), was born in Parys and raised in Durban. And Steve Nash, the two-time Most Valuable Player in the NBA, was born in Johannesburg.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma bids farewell to African Union

first_imgNkosazana Dlamini-Zuma’s term as the head of the African Union has drawn to a close. No stranger to politics, she held the position for two terms. We look at her career highlights.Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma is the first woman to head the African Union. Her term runs until the end of January 2017. (Image: African Union, Twitter)Brand South Africa reporterShe’s been a freedom fighter, a politician, a diplomat, a doctor and now her latest role as head of the African Union (AU) – the first woman to hold the position – has come to an end. As Chad’s Moussa Faki Mahamat takes the reins at the pan-African organisation, we look back at Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma’s career.On its website, the AU describes Dlamini-Zuma as “a lady of noble character; a visionary leader, with an incredible passion for the African continent, its developmental ambitions, and is a champion of the renewal of Africa”.She had shown depth and understanding about issues dealing with the African continent and had a great grasp of the dynamics of the AU, the organisation said.The strength of Africa lies in its unity and its Pan-Africanism.— Dr Dlamini Zuma (@DlaminiZuma) January 31, 2017Watch:Her early lifeDlamini-Zuma was born during apartheid, on 27 January 1949, in KwaZulu-Natal. But that did not hinder her academic ambitions. She went to the University of Zululand where she read zoology and botany. She graduated with a BSc degree and moved to the University of Natal to begin her medical degree. At the same time, she became involved in South Africa’s liberation struggle.In 1976, she became deputy president of the South African Students Organisation and went into exile. She still completed her medical degree, but at the University of Bristol in the UK.Dlamini-Zuma: the politicianAfter the first democratic elections in 1994, Dlamini-Zuma became South Africa’s minister of health in Nelson Mandela’s government.In that role, she:Successfully transformed a health system that was racially divided;Introduced anti-smoking legislation making public spaces and some private spaces such as schools, clinics, airports, hotels and offices largely smoke-free;Negotiated with pharmaceutical companies to provide generic, and often cheaper, medication to South Africa. “The successful settlement of the matter was hailed as a victory not only for South Africa, but also the poor around the world, particularly in the developing world,” reads her profile on the AU website, and;Initiated a pilot programme in which medical students and graduates participated in community service, often working in impoverished areas.From 1999 to 2009, Dlamini-Zuma was the minister of foreign affairs, during which time she actively worked towards peace, development and stability on the continent.In 2012, she was elected the chairperson of the AU, becoming the first women to hold the position.In a list http://www.trtworld.com/business/2016s-most-powerful-women-142718 of 2016’s most powerful women published by Turkey’s national public broadcaster, Dlamini-Zuma was number six.It was a list “not based on financial status, but rather skills, creativity and influence making a significant impact in various fields”, the article clarified.AU legacyWhen the AU marked its 50th anniversary in 2013, “Agenda 2063: The Africa We Want” was unveiled. Dlamini-Zuma was integral to its development.Agenda 2063 is the AU’s vision to build an integrated, prosperous and peaceful Africa, and is viewed as a new phase in efforts by Africans to catalyse development of the continent and strengthen African integration and unity.“It is her biggest deliverable,” said the outgoing EU representative, ambassador Gary Quince. “For the first time, the AU has a blueprint and a vision.”I have no doubt that the in-coming Commission will continue to strengthen & build upon these foundations, just like the foundations we met.— Dr Dlamini Zuma (@DlaminiZuma) January 31, 2017She also focused on gender empowerment within the organisation, and for women in general.“For me and my fellow commissioners, wherever I shall be and in whatever capacity, I shall forever remain soldiers of the African cause,” she tweeted at the end of January.The new leadership of the AU comprises:Elected Leadership of the @_African Union Commission #28thAUSummit pic.twitter.com/nLOkNeQkmQ— African Union (@_AfricanUnion) February 1, 2017Source: African UnionWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Should City Governments Sponsor Seed Funds?

first_imgRelated Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Analysis#start A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… In February, Portland, Oregon Mayor Sam Adams announced the city would put $500,000 towards a seed fund to help encourage regional startups. And on Friday of last week, the Portland Development Commission announced it had finally chosen the five local business leaders to help launch the fund, predicting it would be “open for business” by the fall.Portland isn’t the only city undertaking these sorts of early-stage investments. Last month, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced his city was sponsoring an Entrepreneurial Fund, in a partnership with Firstmark Capital that had over $20 million earmarked to fund startups.Following a rather dour report from the Kauffman Foundation that placed Seattle at the bottom of major metropolitan areas for entrepreneurial activity, the Seattle-based technology blog Techflash asked its readers if Seattle should setup its own, similar early-stage fund.The majority of responses to their poll were negative: the city had better ways to spend its money. And although the economic contribution of a healthy entrepreneurial climate is something that cities want to foster, managing these investments might prove difficult. While a city like New York not only has a sizeable startup fund but has a large community of investors, it remains to be seen how a small, city-run seed fund like Portland has created will impact both the local investment and the local entrepreneurial communities.What do you think? Should cities be in the angel business? What other steps – beyond the usual “tax incentives” – can cities take in order to help foster a strong local startup community?center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting audrey watters 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more